All upcoming events

Functions and regulation of 3D genome organisation in development and disease

Date:
23
Tuesday
January
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Francois Spitz
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
Abstract: The complex hierarchy of three-dimensional patterns that characterize the 3D fol ...The complex hierarchy of three-dimensional patterns that characterize the 3D folding of mammalian chromosomes appears as an important element in controlling gene expression. At the megabase scale, chromosomes are partitioned into domains that define two main compartments, corresponding to transcriptionally active and inactive regions, respectively. Each compartment domain is itself composed of distinct domains characterized by increased self-interactions called topological domains (TADs). Recent high-resolution Hi-C approaches revealed a finer-scale organisation of the genome in smaller “contact domains”, often associated with loops linking specific points. At these different scales, the spatial organisation of the genome shows tight correlation with its chromatin structure and its transcriptional activity. However, while steady progress is being made in describing the 3D folding of the genome at increased resolution, the mechanisms that determine this folding, its dynamic properties and the functional implications of these emerging features are still poorly understood. We use advanced genome tagging and engineering strategies, as well as targeted inactivation of factors involved in chromosomal folding to unravel the elements and mechanisms that drive the folding of large loci in specific yet dynamic conformations and their influence on gene expression. Our recent results show that the complex patterns of vertebrate HiC maps result from the superimposition of two distinct mechanisms: 1) a cohesin-independent mechanism which brings together regions of similar chromatin states 2) a cohesin-dependent folding that associate different small compartments into TADs. Within TADS, we show as well that enhancers are not acting in a homogeneous manner, but that their influence is distributed in complex patterns, partially guided by the underlying structure. I will discuss the different implications of these findings for our views of genome organisation.

Noncoding RNA in Health and Disease

Date:
30
Tuesday
January
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Nikolaus Rajewsky
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

Cell-Weizmann Institute of Science Symposium: Next Gen Immunology

Date:
11
Sunday
February
2018
-
14
Wednesday
February
2018
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium

Optimizations and trade-offs in cellular growth and survial

Date:
25
Sunday
February
2018
-
27
Tuesday
February
2018
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

All Events

Single cell analysis of rare events in cancer

Date:
09
Tuesday
January
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Arjun Raj
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

Revealing the structural basis for membrane transport and GPCR signaling through atomic-level simulation

Date:
26
Tuesday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Ron Dror
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
Details: We have used molecular dynamics simulations, together with complementary experimental approaches, to address longstanding questions about the function of two large and critical classes of membrane proteins. First, transporters shuttle molecules across cell membranes by alternating among distinct conformational states. Despite decades of study, fundamental questions remain about how transporters transition between states and how such structural rearrangements regulate substrate translocation. We have captured the translocation process by unguided molecular dynamics simulations, providing an atomic-level description of alternating access transport [1]. Second, roughly one-third of all drugs act by binding to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and either triggering or preventing receptor activation. The process by which they do so has proven difficult to determine, however, despite dramatic recent advances in GPCR crystallography. We have used simulations to reveal the processes by which drugs bind to GPCRs, by which GPCRs transition between active and inactive states, and by which GPCRs stimulate G proteins [2–6]. Our results suggest opportunities for the design of drugs that achieve greater specificity and control receptor signaling more precisely.

Frontiers in Systems Biology

Date:
19
Tuesday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Title: Modulating Translation
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Mihaela Zavolan
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
Abstract: In yeast, the knock out of individual ribosomal protein (RP) genes ...In yeast, the knock out of individual ribosomal protein (RP) genes leads to a wide range of life span phenotypes, some mutants having significantly increased, other significantly decreased life span. In this talk I would like to present our efforts in characterizing the regulation of mRNA translation in relation to cellular states, from yeast to man. I will describe our work on inferring determinants of protein synthesis rates in yeast, where we found that the Gcn4 transcription factor, which is induced in many conditions that enhance yeast lifespan (RP gene knockout, calorie restriction, mTOR inhibition) not only activates transcription of amino acid biosynthesis genes, but also represses protein biosynthesis. How much variation in RP expression is expected in human tissues has been largely unknown, but RP gene mutations have been described in association with hematological disorders. Through a comprehensive analysis of human RP mRNAs expression pattern across 28 tissues, over 300 primary cells and 16 tumor types, we identified many RPs which exhibit tissue-specific expression. In the hematopoietic system, a small number of RP genes, possible regulated by transcription factors with tissue-specific expression, unequivocally discriminate cells of distinct lineages and developmental stages. Different cancer types also show dysregulated expression of individual RPs, some RPs having a relative increase and other decrease in expression. Finally, I will discuss our efforts in mapping sites of snoRNA-guided RNA modifications.

Accessing the genome: transcription factors as sensors and modifiers of chromatin

Date:
12
Tuesday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Dirk Schubeler
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
Details: In the complex genomes of higher eukaryotes transcription factors only occupy a subset of their binding motifs. Chromatin structure and DNA methylation are thought to be involved in specifying actual sites of binding and in turn gene regulation. This predicts that transcription factors are sensitive to such epigenetic marks, which we test in the cellular context using genomics and proteomics approaches. In case of DNA methylation this identified factors that are insensitive to DNA methylation yet can cause reduced methylation upon binding, which in turn enables binding of sensitive factors. Global assessment of transcription factor binding upon genetic deletions of chromatin remodelers reveals transcription factor-specific dependences for nucleosome remodeling complexes. One group, containing the insulator protein CTCF, depends for binding on Snf2H, while other factors such as NSRF depend on BRG1 highlighting that chromatin sensitivity is highly factor specific. In an orthologous approach, we developed a novel method to quantify the chromatin-associated proteome using mass spectrometry. This enabled to measure the chromatome and its dynamics throughout the cell cycle. Interestingly, while epigenetic modifiers that promote transcription are lost from mitotic chromatin, repressive modifiers generally remain associated. Furthermore, most transcription factors are retained on mitotic chromatin, including several core promoter binding proteins. This predicts conservation of the regulatory landscape on highly condensed mitotic chromosomes which genome-wide measures of chromatin accessibility confirm. I will discuss these findings in light of current models of chromatin function in gene regulation and its maintenance through cell division.

Frontiers in Systems Biology: Prof. Jörg Vogel

Date:
05
Tuesday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Jörg Vogel
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

"Coordination of microbial metabolism through metabolite-protein interactions”

Date:
21
Tuesday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Title: Systems in Frontiers Seminar
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Uwe Sauer
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

Epistasis, pleiotropy, the ruggedness of fitness landscape, and the Predictability of RNA virus evolution

Date:
14
Tuesday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Santiago Elena
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

You say tomato, I say potato. Evolution of the genetic code in yeasts

Date:
07
Tuesday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Title: Frontiers in Systems Biology
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Ken Wolfe
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

Specificity and evolution of bacterial signaling proteins

Date:
31
Tuesday
October
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Michael Laub
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
Abstract: Protein-protein interactions are critical to the operation and functions of all ...Protein-protein interactions are critical to the operation and functions of all cells. The specificity of these interactions is often dictated at the level of molecular recognition, meaning proteins have an intrinsic ability to discriminate cognate from non-cognate partners. Understanding precisely how this discrimination is accomplished remains a major problem, particularly for paralogous protein families in which the individual members share high sequence and structural similarity. Our work tackles this problem primarily in the context of two-component signal transduction systems, the predominant form of signaling in bacteria, and more recently with toxin-antitoxin systems, also found throughout the bacterial kingdom. I will describe our work using analyses of amino acid coevolution to pinpoint the molecular basis of specificity in these proteins. This work has enabled the rational rewiring of protein-protein interactions and signal transduction pathways. Additionally, these studies have driven efforts to systematically map sequence spaces and probe the selective pressures and constraints that govern the evolution of protein-protein interactions.

Systems Biology innovative awards

Date:
19
Tuesday
September
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 09:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

The surprising expansion of the epigenetic regulatory repertoire in mammals

Date:
10
Sunday
September
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:00
Title: Special Guest Lecture
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Dr. Andrew Xiao, PhD
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
Details: The nucleosomes, which contain histones and DNA, are the basic repeating units of our genomes; and the interactions between histones and DNA are largely invariable in evolution. Against this backdrop, mammalian genomes contain several histone variants that carry significantly different protein sequences, indicating that the histone-variant containing nucleosomes may accommodate yet unknown DNA modifications. Our previous work demonstrated that the deposition pattern of H2A.X is a functional marker that can distinguish the developmental potentials of mouse iPSC lines (Wu et al. Cell stem cell 2014). We have recently made a surprising discovery of N6-mA, together with its demethylase in a mammalian genome and further elucidated its functions in embryonic stem cells (Wu et al. Nature 2016). We found that N6-mA is enriched in histone variant H2A.X deposited genomic regions in mouse ESCs. Furthermore, N6-mA plays a critical function in epigenetic silencing of young LINE1 transposons, which are enriched on the X chromosome. Our unpublished work demonstrated that N6-mA levels are strongly correlated with the developmental potentials of the pluripotent stem cells. In summary, our work revealed that embryonic stem cells utilize novel epigenetic mechanisms for maintaining self-renewal and pluripotency.

From Statistical Mechanics to Cancer Genomics

Date:
16
Tuesday
May
2017
-
17
Wednesday
May
2017
Retreat
Time: 09:00 - 18:00
Location: Weissman Auditorium, Physics Building
Organizer: Department of Physics of Complex Systems

19th Israeli Bioinformatics Symposium

Date:
15
Monday
May
2017
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium

System Biology Symposium

Date:
15
Sunday
January
2017
Retreat
Time: 00:00
Location: Ein-Gedi
Organizer: Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics

Trans-generational epigenetic memory of environmental change in C. elegans

Date:
06
Tuesday
December
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 13:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Ben Lehner
Organizer: Life Sciences

Information processing and decision making in live cells

Date:
22
Tuesday
November
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Lecturer: Prof. Andre Levchenko
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

Requirement of FcγR pathways for the anti tumor activity of immunomodulatory antibodies

Date:
28
Tuesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Dr. Rony Dahan
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Development of iPSC-based Cardiorespiratory Therapies

Date:
08
Wednesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:30
Location: Camelia Botnar Building
Lecturer: Prof. Ulrich Martin
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Specificity in Protein Degradation

Date:
08
Wednesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00
Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
Lecturer: Prof. Marc Kirschner
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Using single-cell transcriptomics to study cell fate decisions in early mammalian development

Date:
01
Wednesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Dr. John Marioni
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Mapping cell differentiation by single cell droplet microfluidic profiling

Date:
06
Wednesday
April
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:00
Location: Camelia Botnar Building
Lecturer: Prof. Allon Klein
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Transcriptional oscillations in adult stem cell homeostasis and ageing

Date:
03
Thursday
March
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 13:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Salvador Aznar Benitah
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Life at the single molecule level: Single cell genomics

Date:
05
Tuesday
January
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Sunney Xie
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Life at the single molecule level: Single cell genomics

Date:
05
Tuesday
January
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Sunney Xie
Organizer: Department of Immunology

From single cell enzymology to bacteria gene expression

Date:
04
Monday
January
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 09:15-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Sunney Xie
Organizer: Department of Immunology