Enteroviruses hijack lipid droplets to build their replication factories

Date:
12
Tuesday
April
2022
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
Lecturer: Dr. Orly Laufman
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Details: Dept. of Molecular Genetics - WIS
Abstract: Positive-strand RNA viruses including corona, zika and dengue are a major threat ... Read more Positive-strand RNA viruses including corona, zika and dengue are a major threat to public health. A critical step in the life cycle of all positive-strand RNA viruses is the replication of their genome on cellular membranes called replication compartments. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation of the replication compartments are not well understood. Enteroviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that cause diverse medical complications in humans including myocarditis, meningitis and paralysis. Combining biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology approaches, we discovered that enteroviruses hijack lipid storage organelles called lipid droplets and use the lipids stored within them to generate their replication compartments. I will describe the sophisticated viral mechanisms involved in the hijack of lipid droplets and the channeling of their content to promote virus replication. Our studies illuminate the mechanisms by which positive-strand RNA viruses rewire host organelles and lipid metabolism and provide a snapshot into the complex replication program of these viruses.
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