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Special Guest Seminar

Date:
24
Thursday
November
2022
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00
Title: "Autophagy - from cargo to structure"
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Florian Wilfling
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Past

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    Special guest seminar, Dr Harry Burgess

    Date:
    15
    Monday
    August
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: If not now-when? Circuits for urgent defensive behavior in zebrafish
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Harry Burgess
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Single-molecule and single-cell epigenetics: Decoding the epigenome for cancer research and diagnostics

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    July
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Efrat Shema
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    July
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Title: “The deep population history of the Americas”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. David Reich
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Roy Maimon

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    June
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Title: Tracing Glia-into-Neuron Conversion in the Aged Mouse Brain using Single Cell Spatial Transcriptomics
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/95250374032?pwd=U0h4QmFQZENIZ0cvOENMZ0hMamdpQT09
    Lecturer: Dr. Roy Maimon
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Neuroscience

    Special guest seminar with Dr. Or Shemesh

    Date:
    28
    Tuesday
    June
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Title: Infectious Neuroscience - Do Common Pathogens Play a Part in Neurodegeneration?
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Or Shemesh
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Neuroscience
    Abstract: Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) is a usual suspect when it comes to Alzheimer's d ... Read more Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) is a usual suspect when it comes to Alzheimer's disease (AD), and its DNA and RNA were found in the brains and serological samples of AD patients. Such molecular presence of HSV-1 in AD is especially intriguing as HSV-1 virions are rarely detected in AD brains. To follow the molecular footsteps detected, we imaged viral proteins in postmortem human AD brains at superior resolution using expansion microscopy, a tissue manipulation method that physically expands the samples by a factor of 4.5x, allowing a 40 nm imaging resolution, and immunolabeled herpetic proteins, AD pathologies and cell markers. We found an abundance of herpetic proteins, previously undetectable with standard methods, across large brain areas. Importantly, we found that HSV-1 proteins strongly co-localized with AD pathologies. Consequently, we hypothesized that expression of HSV-1 proteins during latency may be linked to AD pathology. We are now in the process of characterizing the HSV-1 proteome in AD brains by imaging key proteins in expanded AD brain slices and examining their colocalization with AD pathologies across brain areas and disease stages. As a complementary system to the fixed human brain slices, we are exposing live human brain organoids, to HSV-1, and imaging the relationships between viral proteins and the formation of AD pathologies via expansion microscopy. Pathogens may be triggers of immune responses driving AD; this study would shed light on one common pathogen, HSV-1, while serving as a framework to unveiling molecular causation between infectious agents and AD hallmarks.
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    Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Hervé Le Hir

    Date:
    15
    Sunday
    May
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Title: The multiple facets of the Exon Junction Complex
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Hervé Le Hir
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Balanced activities of Atg2 and Atg24 regulate opening of the autophagic isolation membrane rim

    Date:
    10
    Tuesday
    May
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Oren Shatz
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Autophagy targets cytosolic portions to lysosomal degradation by sequestration i ... Read more Autophagy targets cytosolic portions to lysosomal degradation by sequestration into a de novo built isolation membrane. Using novel tools for molecular genetics in budding yeast, I show that these membranes expand in the shape of a round amphora with a narrow opening at the rim. Partial loss of Atg2 leads to widening of the rim by in situ activity of Atg24. Interestingly, Atg24 also promotes inflation of the autophagic vesicle and sequestration of large cargo. My work thus suggests a new topological model for isolation membrane expansion, wherein tight regulation of the rim by distinct molecules governs both the shape and the cargo of the autophagic vesicle.
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    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar

    Date:
    08
    Sunday
    May
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Yehuda Danino & Tslil Braun
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    The genetics of genetics: dissecting recombination and meiosis in maize

    Date:
    26
    Tuesday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:45
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Wojtek Pawlowski
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Avi Levy

    Special guest seminar with Prof. Kent Søe

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:30-14:30
    Title: Heterogeneity of human osteoclasts from a cellular to a patient perspective
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Kent Søe
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Physics Hybrid Colloquium

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    March
    2022
    Colloquium
    Time: 11:15-12:30
    Title: Phase Separation in Biological Cells: lessons from and for physics
    Location: Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Samuel Safran
    Organizer: Faculty of Physics
    Abstract: Phase separation is generally a thermodynamic process in which a mixture reaches ... Read more Phase separation is generally a thermodynamic process in which a mixture reaches its lowest free energy state by self-assembling into meso- (or macro-) scale regions that are concentrated or dilute in a given molecular component. Familiar examples include the immiscibility of water and oil, the demixing of metal atoms in alloys, and the mesoscale formation of emulsions such as milk or paint. The fundamental physics behind both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium aspects of phase separation are well understood and this talk will begin with a brief review of those. A rapidly growing body of experiments suggests that phase separation is responsible for the formation of membraneless domains (also known as biomolecular condensates, with length scales on the order of microns) in biological cells. These compartments allow the cell to organize itself in space and can promote or inhibit biochemical reactions, provide regions in which macromolecular assemblies can form, or control the spatial organization of DNA (assembled with proteins as chromatin) in the cell nucleus. I will review some recent examples based on experiments done at the Weizmann Institute on phase separation of proteins and of chromatin in the nucleus and show how physics theory has led to their understanding. In the latter case, a new paradigm is emerging in which the genetic material is not necessarily uniformly distributed within the nucleus but separated into domains which in some cases, have a complex, “marshland”, mesoscale structure. But while many of the equilibrium aspects can be at least semi-quantitatively understood by extensions of statistical physics, biological systems often do not have constant overall compositions as is the case in the examples of oil-water, alloys and emulsions; for example, over time, the cell produces and degrades many proteins. The recent understanding of such strongly non-equilibrium effects has informed the theoretical physics of phase separation and has allowed us to establish a framework in which biological noise can be included. * Collaborations: Omar Arana-Adame, Gaurav Bajpai, Dan Deviri, Amit Kumar (Dept. Chemical and Biological Physics), group of Emmanuel Levy (Dept. Structural Biology) and group of Talila Volk (Dept. Molecular Genetics)
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    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    Date:
    20
    Sunday
    February
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Assaf Biran
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    15
    Tuesday
    February
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Title: “Mitochondrial enzymes in Toxoplasma - a complex story”
    Location: Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96194061419?pwd=K0lmbEFHUlkzTTkxZ1daQ0
    Lecturer: Dr. Lilach Sheiner
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Dissecting temperature sensing and epigenetic switching using mathematical modelling and experiments

    Date:
    08
    Tuesday
    February
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30
    Title: PES Dept. Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Zoom link:https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97166592605?pwd=NVdrc1k4TDJBSXppTFY1Y0ViVzUxZz09 Meeting ID: 971 6659 2605 Password:782843
    Lecturer: Prof. Martin Howard
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Dr.David Zeevi
    Abstract: We are studying the mechanistic basis of epigenetic regulation in the Polycomb s ... Read more We are studying the mechanistic basis of epigenetic regulation in the Polycomb system, a vital epigenetic silencing pathway that is widely conserved from flies to plants to humans. We use the process of vernalization in plants in our experiments, which involves memory of winter cold to permit flowering only when winter has passed via quantitative epigenetic silencing of the floral repressor FLC. Utilising this system has numerous advantages, including slow dynamics and the ability to read out mitotic heritability of expression states through clonal cell files in the roots. Using mathematical modelling and experiments (including ChIP and fluorescent reporter imaging), we have shown that FLC cold-induced silencing is essentially an all-or-nothing (bistable) digital process. The quantitative nature of vernalization is generated by digital chromatin-mediated FLC silencing in a subpopulation of cells whose number increases with the duration of cold. We have further shown that Polycomb-based epigenetic memory is indeed stored locally in the chromatin (in cis) via a dual fluorescent labelling approach. I will also discuss how further predictions from the modelling, including opposing chromatin modification states and extra protein memory storage elements, are being investigated. I will also discuss the mechanisms by which long term fluctuating temperature signals are sensed before being converted into digital chromatin states for long term memory storage.
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    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    Date:
    06
    Sunday
    February
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Title: “Uncovering import pathways of mitochondrial proteins with unconventional targeting signals.” and “Capturing the Mammalian Bilaminar Disc”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/93234264078?pwd=Rm45ZmN3aDFOWmphYndyRFFWR3hTdz09
    Lecturer: Yury Bykov and Oldak Bernardo
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    21
    Tuesday
    December
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00-17:00
    Title: Higher semiadditive representation and character theory.
    Location: Jacob Ziskind Building
    Lecturer: Lior Yanovski
    Organizer: Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science,Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics,Department of Mathematics
    Abstract: In higher algebra, one studies the homotopical analogue of abelian groups, known ... Read more In higher algebra, one studies the homotopical analogue of abelian groups, known as spectra. These objects arise naturally (and facilitate great advances) in various mathematical fields from number theory to differential topology. It is a fundamental fact that in the spectral world there are more "primes", which provide an interpolation between zero and positive characteristics. A key property of the local theory at these intermediate primes is higher semiadditivity, which roughly speaking, provides canonical integrals over homotopically finite topological spaces. In this talk, I will discuss a "higher" analogue of representation and character theory, where characteristic zero vector spaces are replaced by spectra localized at any particular intermediate prime, and finite groups are generalized to a homotopically finite version thereof. In particular, I will present a work in progress on the generalization of the "induced character formula" in terms of the higher semiadditive structure and discuss its relationship with topological Hochschild homology.
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    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    21
    Tuesday
    December
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Title: How a plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite reprograms plant adaptive-responses and developmental networks
    Location: Benoziyo Bldg. for Biological Sciences Auditorium - Floor 1
    Lecturer: Prof. Katayoon (Katie) Dehesh
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Asaph Aharoni

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    15
    Wednesday
    December
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:15-12:30
    Title: Floquet Hamiltonians and topological insulators
    Location: Jacob Ziskind Building
    Lecturer: Amir Sagiv
    Organizer: Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Abstract: Floquet topological insulators (FTIs) are an emerging category of materials w ... Read more Floquet topological insulators (FTIs) are an emerging category of materials whose properties are transformed by time-periodic forcing, with a wide range of applications to electronics, laser science, and more. Traditionally, the theory of FTIs is based on discrete, approximated models. Can FTIs be understood from their first-principles continuum models, i.e., from a driven Schrodinger equation? First, we rigorously show that the propagation of physically relevant wave-packets are governed by a Dirac equation. This dynamical-systems approach allows us to study both the bulk and edge insulation of FTIs. In particular, we show that in the continuous Dirac model, localized edge-modes decay due to a resonance phenomenon.
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    Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    Date:
    28
    Sunday
    November
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Amit Kahana (lancet lab) Gabriela Lobinska (Pilpel lab)
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Correlating archaeology, geology, human evolution and genetics in the Kalahari: Some ideas from the southern fringe

    Date:
    25
    Thursday
    November
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Michael Chazan
    Organizer: Scientific Archeology Unit
    Details: Zoom details: Meeting ID: 616-854-8886 Meeting password: 976012

    Special Guest seminar

    Date:
    24
    Wednesday
    November
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Title: “Origin, evolution and domestication of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae”
    Location: Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99054616059?pwd=Vis4a1BQSnB1aUhJQ1hwN0ZwRzBqQT09 Meet ing ID: 9905 4616 059 Pas sword: 599698
    Lecturer: Prof. Gianni Liti
    Organizer: Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    02
    Tuesday
    November
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Title: Self-organized morphogenesis of a stem-cell derived human neural tu
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91871920099?pwd=Qm1kZzc2emV3cGQyekthNWFCOThWdz09
    Lecturer: Dr. Eyal Karzbrun
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Social Behavior in a Social Context: Lessons from Studying Genetic and Neuronal Manipulations affecting Social Behavior in a Complex Environment

    Date:
    19
    Tuesday
    October
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Lecturer: Noa Eren (PhD Thesis Defense)
    Organizer: Department of Brain Sciences
    Details: Zoom link to join: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94822556146?pwd=VnY2eDVGeWdSNmFCV ... Read more Zoom link to join: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94822556146?pwd=VnY2eDVGeWdSNmFCVC9zZDVrWUtvUT09 Meeting ID: 948 2255 6146 Password: 884034
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    Abstract: As methods for highly specific and precise manipulations of genetics and neurona ... Read more As methods for highly specific and precise manipulations of genetics and neuronal activity become the standard in neuroscience, there is growing demand for behavioral paradigms to evolve as well, beyond the simplified and reductive tests which are commonly used. This is especially evident in social behavior, where standard testing paradigms are typically short, involve only a pair of animals, and take place in stimulus-poor environments. Here, we present a series of studies using the Social Box, an experimental setup developed in our lab to automatically track groups of mice living in an enriched environment over days, and extract dozens of behavioral readouts at the individual, dyadic, and group level. We manipulated neuronal populations expressing the socially-relevant neuropeptides oxytocin (OXT) and urocortin3 (UCN3), and utilized genetic mouse models of human disorders affecting sociability – autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) – to demonstrate the importance of the social context in studying mouse behavior. Repeated optogenetic activation of Oxt+ cells recapitulated the known effect of reducing aggressive behavior in the classical resident-intruder paradigm, but in a group of conspecifics it led to an increase in such behaviors on the second day of activation. In parallel, chemogenetic activation of Oxt+ or Ucn3+ cells, separately or together, increased aggressive behavior in the context of a territorial conflict. Finally, behavior of ASD-like mice was mediated by the group composition, such that single-genotype groups showed greater genotype separation in multi-behavioral space than mixed-genotype groups. These findings emphasize the importance of considering contextual and environmental factors when designing and interpreting behavioral studies, which could affect the translatability of findings from mouse to human. Zoom link to join: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94822556146?pwd=VnY2eDVGeWdSNmFCVC9zZDVrWUtvUT09 Meeting ID: 948 2255 6146 Password: 884034
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    Special Guest Seminar - Dr. Tslil Ast

    Date:
    05
    Tuesday
    October
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:30
    Title: "Looking behind the iron curtain: Illuminating iron-sulfur cluster biology”
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Dr. Tslil Ast
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Special guest seminar with Dr. Inna Ricardo-Lax

    Date:
    20
    Tuesday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00-13:00
    Title: Efficient replication and single cycle delivery of SARS-CoV2 replicons
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Inna Ricardo-Lax
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: Zoom details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94562562763?pwd=NFRmZkNHWUVONjN3dGxoUjJ ... Read more Zoom details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94562562763?pwd=NFRmZkNHWUVONjN3dGxoUjJuQ2U5QT09 Meeting ID: 945 6256 2763 Password: 429057
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    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    12
    Monday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:30
    Title: Beyond Darwin: understanding cancer persister cells
    Lecturer: Dr. Yaara Oren
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97339959821?pwd=QkloVEFNVGMwWjlzMWRrSTQyMUZhQT09

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    12
    Monday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: The ribosome supracomplex: a new therapeutic target in viral infection and neurodegeneration
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Ranen Aviner
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences

    Molecular Genetics departmental seminar with Omri Gilhar

    Date:
    27
    Sunday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Omri Gilhar
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar with Nancy Yacovzada

    Date:
    20
    Sunday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Nancy Yacovzada
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar with Daoud Sheiban

    Date:
    13
    Sunday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Daoud Sheiban
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar with Yotam David

    Date:
    06
    Sunday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: Identification of novel Golgi contact sites proteins using high throughput screening yeast
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Yotam David
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar with Sveta Markman

    Date:
    30
    Sunday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: Limb development through the lens of single cell analysis
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Svetlana Markman
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar

    Date:
    11
    Sunday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: Identifying an RNA binding protein with suggested functions in translation during embryonic stem cell differentiation
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98861386247?pwd=YXR2aEFxaU9QYUo1NEtJbFgxTTgzUT09
    Lecturer: Nadav Goldberg
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar

    Date:
    04
    Sunday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: Deciphering genetic determinants of sexual mating and its effects on evolution
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92437760766?pwd=UERKWEFWYkoxb1FTM0dvVCszUkdqdz09
    Lecturer: Sivan Kaminski
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    Date:
    21
    Sunday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: “Watching translocation as it occurs: A new approach to study protein targeting”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96948336875?pwd=Q3Bva1hldHdWVk85a2JZeDIxMUZBdz09
    Lecturer: Nir Cohen
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    Date:
    14
    Sunday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: “Quantitative analysis by 3D MAPs reveals new cell morphogenetic behaviors which drive bone growth”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97246877306?pwd=R1FSemROR3hseTNWRDhQeVNBSExWZz09
    Lecturer: Sarah Rubin
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics department seminar

    Date:
    07
    Sunday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: “Ambiguity resolution in the TGFb/ BMP pathways through combinatorial SMAD complex formation”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92440011671?pwd=Yk9kQUpqWkJnUmFMRUlnT0NaSlliUT09
    Lecturer: Johannes Auth
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar

    Date:
    14
    Sunday
    February
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: Finding new targets: the evolutionary fate of Transcription Factor paralogs
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91052387562?pwd=b2FpVG9UQTdROUVVaXRIK0pKa2hZdz09
    Lecturer: Tamar Gera
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00-17:30
    Title: "Dietary sulfur amino acids modulate kidney function and anti-tumor immunity via the gut microbiota"
    Lecturer: Dr. Lior Lobel
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Mee ... Read more https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Meeting ID: 964 6089 5671 Password: 599560
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    Special zoom joint guest seminar

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: “The mystery of the malaria plastid: Molecular Genetics to the Rescue”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99687213443?pwd=bUZoV2R3UmorNmxUREdYTnNTd3BUQT09
    Lecturer: Dr. Anat Florentin
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    03
    Sunday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:30
    Title: "Socializing with the Neighbors: Stem Cells Reshape Their Environment to Coordinate Tissue Regeneration."
    Lecturer: Dr. Shiri Gur-Cohen
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99093074201?pwd=N2hVRjQvRk10cEFGS2R3SkFTWFgwQT09 Mee ... Read more https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99093074201?pwd=N2hVRjQvRk10cEFGS2R3SkFTWFgwQT09 Meeting ID: 990 9307 4201 Password: 319779
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    Special Guest Seminar - David Gokhman

    Date:
    27
    Sunday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Title: “Human evolution through the lens of gene regulation”
    Lecturer: Dr. David Gokhman
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92694929241?pwd=clN1NWJnTWJ3dlZEMDdiV01PZ ... Read more Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92694929241?pwd=clN1NWJnTWJ3dlZEMDdiV01PZ3VPZz09 Meeting ID: 926 9492 9241 Password: 557321
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    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar with Yaara Finkel

    Date:
    06
    Sunday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: “The translational landscape of SARS-CoV-2 infection”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/93515866128?pwd=eXg2bkpxTVlVWGFyWnNuZUkxMk5Ddz09
    Lecturer: Yaara Finkel
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics departmental seminar with Sharon Ben-Hur

    Date:
    29
    Sunday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: An intruder-targeting system eliminates paternal mitochondria after fertilization
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Sharon Ben-Hur
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97228628963?pwd=T2ZCQ2F0V0pVbXZSdTd3eDNWYT ... Read more Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97228628963?pwd=T2ZCQ2F0V0pVbXZSdTd3eDNWYTRBQT09 Meeting ID: 972 2862 8963 Password: 285284
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    New approaches to early embryogenesis and epigenetics

    Date:
    23
    Monday
    November
    2020
    -
    25
    Wednesday
    November
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Molecular Genetics departmental seminar with Orel Mizrahi

    Date:
    22
    Sunday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: HCMV encoded lncRNA manipulates cellular mRNA export during infection via NXF1 sequestration
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Orel Mizrahi
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special guest seminar with Dr. Yosef Kaplan Dor

    Date:
    16
    Monday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00
    Title: “Sleep loss and the gut”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96213472011?pwd=cWJaVHZhbGpibDJWZ2I4MDRMMEhQUT09
    Lecturer: Dr. Yosef Dor Kaplan
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Abstract: Sleep is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, but its function has been a mystery. ... Read more Sleep is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, but its function has been a mystery. Besides its importance for the brain, sleep appears to play an essential physiological role, emphasized by the fact that severe sleep loss can be lethal. The cause of this lethality was unknown. We found that extreme sleep deprivation results in high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that trigger oxidative stress specifically in the gut of flies and mice. Using flies, we show that neutralization of intestinal ROS prevents premature death of sleep-deprived animals, suggesting a causal link between ROS accumulation in the gut and lethality upon sleep loss. What may explain the observed phenomena? Could it teach us about the normal, daily function of sleep? In the second part of my talk, I will present our current attempts and preliminary data aiming at answering these questions.
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    Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    Date:
    15
    Sunday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: “Characterizing the contact site between the nucleus and mitochondria in yeast”
    Lecturer: Naama Zung
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar

    Date:
    08
    Sunday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: “Proteomic landscape of Stress Granules in health and neurodegeneration”
    Lecturer: Hagai Marmor
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    ECM, cytoskeleton and migration

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Molecular Genetics special guest seminar

    Date:
    27
    Thursday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: “Transsynaptic mapping and manipulation of neural circuits by trans-Tango”
    Lecturer: Prof. Gilad Barnea
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Abstract: I will present trans-Tango, a new technique for anterograde transsynaptic circui ... Read more I will present trans-Tango, a new technique for anterograde transsynaptic circuit tracing and manipulation that we have established in fruit flies. At the core of trans-Tango is a synthetic signaling pathway that is introduced into all neurons in the animal. This pathway converts receptor activation at the cell-surface into reporter expression through site-specific proteolysis. Specific labeling is achieved by presenting a tethered ligand at the synapses of genetically defined neurons, thereby activating the pathway in their postsynaptic partners. Activation of the pathway culminates in expression of a reporter that can be visualized. Because our system is modular, it can be easily adapted to experiments in which the properties of specific circuits are modified and the functional consequences are analyzed. We first validated trans-Tango in the Drosophila olfactory system and then implemented it in the gustatory system, where projections beyond the firstorder receptor neurons are not well characterized. We identified second-order neurons within the sweet and bitter circuits and revealed that they target brain areas involved in neuromodulation with similar but distinct projection patterns. I will also present experiments in which we use trans-Tango in functional analysis of the gustatory circuits. Using our studies in flies as proof of concept, we are currently establishing an equivalent technique for labeling circuits in vertebrate models, such as mice and zebrafish. These experiments establish trans-Tango as a flexible platform for comprehensive transsynaptic analysis of neural circuits.
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    Evolutionary genetics of microbe-plant symbioses: lessons from “Rhizobium leguminosarum – Vavilovia formosa

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:15
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Nikolai A. Provorov
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Asaph Aharoni

    Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Detlef Wiegel

    Date:
    12
    Wednesday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Title: “Epistasis; the spice of life (and evolution): Lessons from the plant immune system”
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Detlef Wiegel
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: My group is addressing fundamental questions in evolutionary biology, using both ... Read more My group is addressing fundamental questions in evolutionary biology, using both genome- and phenotype-first approaches. A few years ago, we discovered that Arabidopsis thaliana is a great model for the study of hybrid necrosis. This widespread syndrome of hybrid failure in plants is caused by plant paranoia – regardless of the presence of enemies, plants “think” they are being attacked by pathogens. Over the past decade, we have studied in detail the underlying genetics, finding that often one or two loci encoding NLR immune receptors are causal. NLRs make up the most variable gene family in plants, and it is not surprising that they are often involved in genome-genome conflicts. Hybrid necrosis results when NLR genes meet that have not been co-adapted. This has in turn raised the question of the scale of NLR diversity, and our goal for the next decade is to understand the genomic and geographic patterns of immune system and especially NLR diversity. In 2018, we initiated a project, PATHO(gens in Arabi)DOPSIS, in which we aim to describe genetic diversity in the host A. thaliana and two of its important pathogens, the generalist Pseudomonas sp. and the specialist Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. The long-term vision is to produce maps of resistance alleles in the host, and of effector alleles in the pathogens, in order to learn when the pathogens win in a wild plant pathosystem – and when the hosts prevail. Detlef Weigel, a German-American scientist, is currently Executive Director of the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Royal Society, and recipient of several scientific awards. The first major finding from his lab was that an Arabidopsis gene could dramatically accelerate flowering of trees; this established a proof of concept for Arabidopsis genetics as a platform for biotechnological discoveries. His group later discovered the first plant microRNA mutant and identified the factor that we now know to be the long sought-after mobile flower-inducing signal. Detlef was also one of the first to exploit natural genetic variation for understanding how the environment affects plant development. In recent years, this work has come to incorporate questions at the interface of evolution and ecology: How can wild plants adapt to climate change, and how do they manage to keep their pathogens at bay? In addition to hypothesis-driven research, his group has a long history of providing new technologies and resources to the community. This has culminated in a collaborative effort to sequence the genomes of over 1,000 natural A. thaliana strains (The 1001 Genomes Project). Detlef has an extensive record of service to the scientific community, having served on a series of editorial and advisory boards. He is a forceful advocate of open access publishing and founding Deputy Editor of eLife. He is a co-founder of three biotech startups.
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    Double Special Guest Seminar: Prof. Lynn Hedrick and Prof. Klaus Ley.

    Date:
    06
    Thursday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Lynn Hedrick and Prof. Klaus Ley
    Organizer: Department of Systems Immunology
    Details: Prof. Lynn Hedrick Will lecture on: “Monocytes in Cancer Immunotherapy”. ... Read more Prof. Lynn Hedrick Will lecture on: “Monocytes in Cancer Immunotherapy”. Prof. Klaus Ley M.D Will lecture on: “The Olfactory Receptor Olfr2 in vascular macrophages drives atherosclerosis”.
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    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    05
    Wednesday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Title: “Mining the marine microbiome for remediation targets: lessons from the human microbiome”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. David Zeevi
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics,Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences

    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

    Date:
    02
    Sunday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics Special guest seminar

    Date:
    28
    Tuesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: “Microtubule dynamics at synaptic contacts are modulated by neuronal activity and affected by oligomeric AB1-42"
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Francesca Bartolini
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: MTs, play key roles in neuronal function. In addition, synaptic biphasic fluctua ... Read more MTs, play key roles in neuronal function. In addition, synaptic biphasic fluctuations of MT instability/stability and tubulin post-translational modifications (PTMs) are associated with memory formation and are disrupted in aging, indicating a primary role for the regulation of MT dynamics and tubulin PTMs in the maintenance of synaptic plasticity. In support of this model, we recently found that stabilization of dynamic MTs and induction of tubulin PTMs by the formin mDia1 contribute to oligomeric Aβ1-42 synaptotoxicity, and inhibition of MT dynamics alone is sufficient to promote tau hyperphosphorylation and tau dependent synaptotoxicity (Qu et al., J Cell Biol, 2017). To test whether these changes occur at synapses and are directly responsible for synapse loss, we have further developed microscopy assays that measure MT invasions into dendritic spines and MT contacts with single presynaptic boutons of hippocampal neurons in culture. Surprisingly, we found that dynamic MT plus ends preferentially grow near presynaptic boutons (Qu et al., Curr Biol, 2019), and rescue/nucleation at boutons is enhanced by neurotransmitter release or when neurons are challenged with oligomeric Aβ1-42, an activity mediated by tau. Our data underscore the existence of a previously uncharacterized formin-mediated pathway of synaptotoxicity and a subset of tau-dependent presynaptic dynamic MTs that respond to neurotransmission and excitotoxicity.
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    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

    Date:
    19
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar with Dr, Michael E. Ward

    Date:
    16
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: “Converging Mechanisms of FTD and ALS”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Michael E. Ward
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

    Date:
    05
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Arbel Harpak

    Date:
    02
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Title: “Interpreting and deconstructing polygenic scores”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Arbel Harpak
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: A polygenic score is a predictor of a person’s trait value computed from his o ... Read more A polygenic score is a predictor of a person’s trait value computed from his or her genotype. Polygenic scores sum over the genetic effects of the alleles carried by a person—as estimated in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for the trait of interest. Fields as diverse as clinical risk classification, evolutionary genetics, social sciences and embryo selection are rapidly adopting polygenic scores. I will show that the prediction accuracy of polygenic scores can be highly sensitive to tiny biases in GWAS effect estimates, and further that that the prediction accuracy of polygenic scores depends on characteristics such as the socio-economic status, age or sex of the people in which the GWAS and the prediction are conducted. These dependencies highlight the complexities of interpreting polygenic scores and the potential for serious inequities in their application in the clinic and beyond. A key reason for these dependencies is in the fact that GWAS estimates are also influenced by factors other than direct genetic effects—including population structure confounding, mating patterns, indirect genetic effects of relatives and other gene-by-environment interactions. I will discuss the development of tools to tease apart the different factors contributing to GWAS associations, and ultimately improve the prediction ability and the interpretation of polygenic scores.
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