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Social Behavior in a Social Context: Lessons from Studying Genetic and Neuronal Manipulations affecting Social Behavior in a Complex Environment

Date:
19
Tuesday
October
2021
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Lecturer: Noa Eren (PhD Thesis Defense)
Organizer: Department of Brain Sciences
Details: Zoom link to join: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94822556146?pwd=VnY2eDVGeWdSNmFCV ... Read more Zoom link to join: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94822556146?pwd=VnY2eDVGeWdSNmFCVC9zZDVrWUtvUT09 Meeting ID: 948 2255 6146 Password: 884034
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Abstract: As methods for highly specific and precise manipulations of genetics and neurona ... Read more As methods for highly specific and precise manipulations of genetics and neuronal activity become the standard in neuroscience, there is growing demand for behavioral paradigms to evolve as well, beyond the simplified and reductive tests which are commonly used. This is especially evident in social behavior, where standard testing paradigms are typically short, involve only a pair of animals, and take place in stimulus-poor environments. Here, we present a series of studies using the Social Box, an experimental setup developed in our lab to automatically track groups of mice living in an enriched environment over days, and extract dozens of behavioral readouts at the individual, dyadic, and group level. We manipulated neuronal populations expressing the socially-relevant neuropeptides oxytocin (OXT) and urocortin3 (UCN3), and utilized genetic mouse models of human disorders affecting sociability – autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) – to demonstrate the importance of the social context in studying mouse behavior. Repeated optogenetic activation of Oxt+ cells recapitulated the known effect of reducing aggressive behavior in the classical resident-intruder paradigm, but in a group of conspecifics it led to an increase in such behaviors on the second day of activation. In parallel, chemogenetic activation of Oxt+ or Ucn3+ cells, separately or together, increased aggressive behavior in the context of a territorial conflict. Finally, behavior of ASD-like mice was mediated by the group composition, such that single-genotype groups showed greater genotype separation in multi-behavioral space than mixed-genotype groups. These findings emphasize the importance of considering contextual and environmental factors when designing and interpreting behavioral studies, which could affect the translatability of findings from mouse to human. Zoom link to join: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94822556146?pwd=VnY2eDVGeWdSNmFCVC9zZDVrWUtvUT09 Meeting ID: 948 2255 6146 Password: 884034
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Special Guest Seminar

Date:
02
Tuesday
November
2021
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Title: Self-organized morphogenesis of a stem-cell derived human neural tu
Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91871920099?pwd=Qm1kZzc2emV3cGQyekthNWFCOThWdz09
Lecturer: Dr. Eyal Karzbrun
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Past

    All Events

    Special Guest Seminar - Dr. Tslil Ast

    Date:
    05
    Tuesday
    October
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:30
    Title: "Looking behind the iron curtain: Illuminating iron-sulfur cluster biology”
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Dr. Tslil Ast
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Special guest seminar with Dr. Inna Ricardo-Lax

    Date:
    20
    Tuesday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00-13:00
    Title: Efficient replication and single cycle delivery of SARS-CoV2 replicons
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Inna Ricardo-Lax
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: Zoom details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94562562763?pwd=NFRmZkNHWUVONjN3dGxoUjJ ... Read more Zoom details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94562562763?pwd=NFRmZkNHWUVONjN3dGxoUjJuQ2U5QT09 Meeting ID: 945 6256 2763 Password: 429057
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    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    12
    Monday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:30
    Title: Beyond Darwin: understanding cancer persister cells
    Lecturer: Dr. Yaara Oren
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97339959821?pwd=QkloVEFNVGMwWjlzMWRrSTQyMUZhQT09

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    12
    Monday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: The ribosome supracomplex: a new therapeutic target in viral infection and neurodegeneration
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Ranen Aviner
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences

    Molecular Genetics departmental seminar with Omri Gilhar

    Date:
    27
    Sunday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Omri Gilhar
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar with Nancy Yacovzada

    Date:
    20
    Sunday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Nancy Yacovzada
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar with Daoud Sheiban

    Date:
    13
    Sunday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Daoud Sheiban
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar with Yotam David

    Date:
    06
    Sunday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: Identification of novel Golgi contact sites proteins using high throughput screening yeast
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Yotam David
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar with Sveta Markman

    Date:
    30
    Sunday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: Limb development through the lens of single cell analysis
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Svetlana Markman
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar

    Date:
    11
    Sunday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: Identifying an RNA binding protein with suggested functions in translation during embryonic stem cell differentiation
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98861386247?pwd=YXR2aEFxaU9QYUo1NEtJbFgxTTgzUT09
    Lecturer: Nadav Goldberg
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar

    Date:
    04
    Sunday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: Deciphering genetic determinants of sexual mating and its effects on evolution
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92437760766?pwd=UERKWEFWYkoxb1FTM0dvVCszUkdqdz09
    Lecturer: Sivan Kaminski
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    Date:
    21
    Sunday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: “Watching translocation as it occurs: A new approach to study protein targeting”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96948336875?pwd=Q3Bva1hldHdWVk85a2JZeDIxMUZBdz09
    Lecturer: Nir Cohen
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    Date:
    14
    Sunday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: “Quantitative analysis by 3D MAPs reveals new cell morphogenetic behaviors which drive bone growth”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97246877306?pwd=R1FSemROR3hseTNWRDhQeVNBSExWZz09
    Lecturer: Sarah Rubin
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics department seminar

    Date:
    07
    Sunday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: “Ambiguity resolution in the TGFb/ BMP pathways through combinatorial SMAD complex formation”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92440011671?pwd=Yk9kQUpqWkJnUmFMRUlnT0NaSlliUT09
    Lecturer: Johannes Auth
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar

    Date:
    14
    Sunday
    February
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: Finding new targets: the evolutionary fate of Transcription Factor paralogs
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91052387562?pwd=b2FpVG9UQTdROUVVaXRIK0pKa2hZdz09
    Lecturer: Tamar Gera
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00-17:30
    Title: "Dietary sulfur amino acids modulate kidney function and anti-tumor immunity via the gut microbiota"
    Lecturer: Dr. Lior Lobel
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Mee ... Read more https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Meeting ID: 964 6089 5671 Password: 599560
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    Special zoom joint guest seminar

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: “The mystery of the malaria plastid: Molecular Genetics to the Rescue”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99687213443?pwd=bUZoV2R3UmorNmxUREdYTnNTd3BUQT09
    Lecturer: Dr. Anat Florentin
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: Science literacy is the key to a strong, inclusive, and prosperous society. Scie ... Read more Science literacy is the key to a strong, inclusive, and prosperous society. Science literacy provides important tools for all aspects of life and enables social mobility.
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    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    03
    Sunday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:30
    Title: "Socializing with the Neighbors: Stem Cells Reshape Their Environment to Coordinate Tissue Regeneration."
    Lecturer: Dr. Shiri Gur-Cohen
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99093074201?pwd=N2hVRjQvRk10cEFGS2R3SkFTWFgwQT09 Mee ... Read more https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99093074201?pwd=N2hVRjQvRk10cEFGS2R3SkFTWFgwQT09 Meeting ID: 990 9307 4201 Password: 319779
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    Special Guest Seminar - David Gokhman

    Date:
    27
    Sunday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Title: “Human evolution through the lens of gene regulation”
    Lecturer: Dr. David Gokhman
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92694929241?pwd=clN1NWJnTWJ3dlZEMDdiV01PZ ... Read more Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92694929241?pwd=clN1NWJnTWJ3dlZEMDdiV01PZ3VPZz09 Meeting ID: 926 9492 9241 Password: 557321
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    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminar with Yaara Finkel

    Date:
    06
    Sunday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: “The translational landscape of SARS-CoV-2 infection”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/93515866128?pwd=eXg2bkpxTVlVWGFyWnNuZUkxMk5Ddz09
    Lecturer: Yaara Finkel
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics departmental seminar with Sharon Ben-Hur

    Date:
    29
    Sunday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: An intruder-targeting system eliminates paternal mitochondria after fertilization
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Sharon Ben-Hur
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97228628963?pwd=T2ZCQ2F0V0pVbXZSdTd3eDNWYT ... Read more Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97228628963?pwd=T2ZCQ2F0V0pVbXZSdTd3eDNWYTRBQT09 Meeting ID: 972 2862 8963 Password: 285284
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    New approaches to early embryogenesis and epigenetics

    Date:
    23
    Monday
    November
    2020
    -
    25
    Wednesday
    November
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Molecular Genetics departmental seminar with Orel Mizrahi

    Date:
    22
    Sunday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: HCMV encoded lncRNA manipulates cellular mRNA export during infection via NXF1 sequestration
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Orel Mizrahi
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special guest seminar with Dr. Yosef Kaplan Dor

    Date:
    16
    Monday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00
    Title: “Sleep loss and the gut”
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96213472011?pwd=cWJaVHZhbGpibDJWZ2I4MDRMMEhQUT09
    Lecturer: Dr. Yosef Dor Kaplan
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: Give the world’s most promising young scientists the means to follow their dre ... Read more Give the world’s most promising young scientists the means to follow their dream, and discoveries will come. Supporting newly recruited faculty members provides them what they need to flourish.
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    Abstract: Sleep is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, but its function has been a mystery. ... Read more Sleep is ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, but its function has been a mystery. Besides its importance for the brain, sleep appears to play an essential physiological role, emphasized by the fact that severe sleep loss can be lethal. The cause of this lethality was unknown. We found that extreme sleep deprivation results in high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that trigger oxidative stress specifically in the gut of flies and mice. Using flies, we show that neutralization of intestinal ROS prevents premature death of sleep-deprived animals, suggesting a causal link between ROS accumulation in the gut and lethality upon sleep loss. What may explain the observed phenomena? Could it teach us about the normal, daily function of sleep? In the second part of my talk, I will present our current attempts and preliminary data aiming at answering these questions.
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    Molecular Genetics departmental seminar

    Date:
    15
    Sunday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: “Characterizing the contact site between the nucleus and mitochondria in yeast”
    Lecturer: Naama Zung
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental seminar

    Date:
    08
    Sunday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: “Proteomic landscape of Stress Granules in health and neurodegeneration”
    Lecturer: Hagai Marmor
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: Our brain makes us who we are. Probing the mysteries of memory, behavior, learni ... Read more Our brain makes us who we are. Probing the mysteries of memory, behavior, learning, and perception helps us to understand ourselves and to improve the way we function in health and in sickness.
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    ECM, cytoskeleton and migration

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Molecular Genetics special guest seminar

    Date:
    27
    Thursday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: “Transsynaptic mapping and manipulation of neural circuits by trans-Tango”
    Lecturer: Prof. Gilad Barnea
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Abstract: I will present trans-Tango, a new technique for anterograde transsynaptic circui ... Read more I will present trans-Tango, a new technique for anterograde transsynaptic circuit tracing and manipulation that we have established in fruit flies. At the core of trans-Tango is a synthetic signaling pathway that is introduced into all neurons in the animal. This pathway converts receptor activation at the cell-surface into reporter expression through site-specific proteolysis. Specific labeling is achieved by presenting a tethered ligand at the synapses of genetically defined neurons, thereby activating the pathway in their postsynaptic partners. Activation of the pathway culminates in expression of a reporter that can be visualized. Because our system is modular, it can be easily adapted to experiments in which the properties of specific circuits are modified and the functional consequences are analyzed. We first validated trans-Tango in the Drosophila olfactory system and then implemented it in the gustatory system, where projections beyond the firstorder receptor neurons are not well characterized. We identified second-order neurons within the sweet and bitter circuits and revealed that they target brain areas involved in neuromodulation with similar but distinct projection patterns. I will also present experiments in which we use trans-Tango in functional analysis of the gustatory circuits. Using our studies in flies as proof of concept, we are currently establishing an equivalent technique for labeling circuits in vertebrate models, such as mice and zebrafish. These experiments establish trans-Tango as a flexible platform for comprehensive transsynaptic analysis of neural circuits.
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    Evolutionary genetics of microbe-plant symbioses: lessons from “Rhizobium leguminosarum – Vavilovia formosa

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:15
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Nikolai A. Provorov
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Asaph Aharoni

    Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Detlef Wiegel

    Date:
    12
    Wednesday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Title: “Epistasis; the spice of life (and evolution): Lessons from the plant immune system”
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Detlef Wiegel
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: My group is addressing fundamental questions in evolutionary biology, using both ... Read more My group is addressing fundamental questions in evolutionary biology, using both genome- and phenotype-first approaches. A few years ago, we discovered that Arabidopsis thaliana is a great model for the study of hybrid necrosis. This widespread syndrome of hybrid failure in plants is caused by plant paranoia – regardless of the presence of enemies, plants “think” they are being attacked by pathogens. Over the past decade, we have studied in detail the underlying genetics, finding that often one or two loci encoding NLR immune receptors are causal. NLRs make up the most variable gene family in plants, and it is not surprising that they are often involved in genome-genome conflicts. Hybrid necrosis results when NLR genes meet that have not been co-adapted. This has in turn raised the question of the scale of NLR diversity, and our goal for the next decade is to understand the genomic and geographic patterns of immune system and especially NLR diversity. In 2018, we initiated a project, PATHO(gens in Arabi)DOPSIS, in which we aim to describe genetic diversity in the host A. thaliana and two of its important pathogens, the generalist Pseudomonas sp. and the specialist Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. The long-term vision is to produce maps of resistance alleles in the host, and of effector alleles in the pathogens, in order to learn when the pathogens win in a wild plant pathosystem – and when the hosts prevail. Detlef Weigel, a German-American scientist, is currently Executive Director of the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina and the Royal Society, and recipient of several scientific awards. The first major finding from his lab was that an Arabidopsis gene could dramatically accelerate flowering of trees; this established a proof of concept for Arabidopsis genetics as a platform for biotechnological discoveries. His group later discovered the first plant microRNA mutant and identified the factor that we now know to be the long sought-after mobile flower-inducing signal. Detlef was also one of the first to exploit natural genetic variation for understanding how the environment affects plant development. In recent years, this work has come to incorporate questions at the interface of evolution and ecology: How can wild plants adapt to climate change, and how do they manage to keep their pathogens at bay? In addition to hypothesis-driven research, his group has a long history of providing new technologies and resources to the community. This has culminated in a collaborative effort to sequence the genomes of over 1,000 natural A. thaliana strains (The 1001 Genomes Project). Detlef has an extensive record of service to the scientific community, having served on a series of editorial and advisory boards. He is a forceful advocate of open access publishing and founding Deputy Editor of eLife. He is a co-founder of three biotech startups.
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    Double Special Guest Seminar: Prof. Lynn Hedrick and Prof. Klaus Ley.

    Date:
    06
    Thursday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Lynn Hedrick and Prof. Klaus Ley
    Organizer: Department of Immunology
    Details: Prof. Lynn Hedrick Will lecture on: “Monocytes in Cancer Immunotherapy”. ... Read more Prof. Lynn Hedrick Will lecture on: “Monocytes in Cancer Immunotherapy”. Prof. Klaus Ley M.D Will lecture on: “The Olfactory Receptor Olfr2 in vascular macrophages drives atherosclerosis”.
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    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    05
    Wednesday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Title: “Mining the marine microbiome for remediation targets: lessons from the human microbiome”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. David Zeevi
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics,Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences

    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

    Date:
    02
    Sunday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics Special guest seminar

    Date:
    28
    Tuesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: “Microtubule dynamics at synaptic contacts are modulated by neuronal activity and affected by oligomeric AB1-42"
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Francesca Bartolini
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: MTs, play key roles in neuronal function. In addition, synaptic biphasic fluctua ... Read more MTs, play key roles in neuronal function. In addition, synaptic biphasic fluctuations of MT instability/stability and tubulin post-translational modifications (PTMs) are associated with memory formation and are disrupted in aging, indicating a primary role for the regulation of MT dynamics and tubulin PTMs in the maintenance of synaptic plasticity. In support of this model, we recently found that stabilization of dynamic MTs and induction of tubulin PTMs by the formin mDia1 contribute to oligomeric Aβ1-42 synaptotoxicity, and inhibition of MT dynamics alone is sufficient to promote tau hyperphosphorylation and tau dependent synaptotoxicity (Qu et al., J Cell Biol, 2017). To test whether these changes occur at synapses and are directly responsible for synapse loss, we have further developed microscopy assays that measure MT invasions into dendritic spines and MT contacts with single presynaptic boutons of hippocampal neurons in culture. Surprisingly, we found that dynamic MT plus ends preferentially grow near presynaptic boutons (Qu et al., Curr Biol, 2019), and rescue/nucleation at boutons is enhanced by neurotransmitter release or when neurons are challenged with oligomeric Aβ1-42, an activity mediated by tau. Our data underscore the existence of a previously uncharacterized formin-mediated pathway of synaptotoxicity and a subset of tau-dependent presynaptic dynamic MTs that respond to neurotransmission and excitotoxicity.
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    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

    Date:
    19
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar with Dr, Michael E. Ward

    Date:
    16
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: “Converging Mechanisms of FTD and ALS”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Michael E. Ward
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

    Date:
    05
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Arbel Harpak

    Date:
    02
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Title: “Interpreting and deconstructing polygenic scores”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Arbel Harpak
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: A polygenic score is a predictor of a person’s trait value computed from his o ... Read more A polygenic score is a predictor of a person’s trait value computed from his or her genotype. Polygenic scores sum over the genetic effects of the alleles carried by a person—as estimated in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for the trait of interest. Fields as diverse as clinical risk classification, evolutionary genetics, social sciences and embryo selection are rapidly adopting polygenic scores. I will show that the prediction accuracy of polygenic scores can be highly sensitive to tiny biases in GWAS effect estimates, and further that that the prediction accuracy of polygenic scores depends on characteristics such as the socio-economic status, age or sex of the people in which the GWAS and the prediction are conducted. These dependencies highlight the complexities of interpreting polygenic scores and the potential for serious inequities in their application in the clinic and beyond. A key reason for these dependencies is in the fact that GWAS estimates are also influenced by factors other than direct genetic effects—including population structure confounding, mating patterns, indirect genetic effects of relatives and other gene-by-environment interactions. I will discuss the development of tools to tease apart the different factors contributing to GWAS associations, and ultimately improve the prediction ability and the interpretation of polygenic scores.
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    Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Onn Brandman

    Date:
    30
    Monday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Title: “Cellular Stress Responses at the molecular and systems levels”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Onn Brandman
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special guest seminar with Moran Dvela-Levitt

    Date:
    22
    Sunday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00-13:00
    Title: “A novel mechanism and therapeutic strategy for protein-misfolding diseases”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Moran Dvela-Levitt
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Abstract: Protein homeostasis is critical for cellular function and survival. Dysregulatio ... Read more Protein homeostasis is critical for cellular function and survival. Dysregulation of the cellular protein homeostasis can lead to a build-up of misfolded proteins and facilitate the manifestation of a variety of pathological disorders including neurodegeneration, cancer and inflammation. Where and how the misfolded proteins accumulate, however, has remained a mystery. In studying MUC1 kidney disease (a rare kidney disorder), we have found that some of these pathologies may share a single, previously unrecognized cellular mechanism: a jam at a specific step in the secretory pathway involving a cargo receptor called TMED9. A small molecule called BRD4780 can break the jam and restore cells to normal function, providing a promising potential for therapeutic developments.
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    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    18
    Wednesday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00-13:00
    Title: "Deconstructing the replication program of enteroviruses in human cells"
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Orly Laufman
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    G-INCPM Special Guest Seminar: Prof. David Bennet, Director of the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush Univ. USA - "A Roadmap to Precision Medicine for ADRD"

    Date:
    17
    Tuesday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:30-14:30
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Abstract: The presentation will review two prospective analytic epidemiologic cohort studi ... Read more The presentation will review two prospective analytic epidemiologic cohort studies of aging in which all participants are organ donors. It will summarize associations of risk factors for common chronic neurologic conditions of aging with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s dementia. It will then summarize the relation of different pathologies and resilience markers assessed at autopsy. Together this will highlight the complexity of neurodegenerative diseases. Next, it will illustrate how multi-level brain omic data can be mined to identify novel therapeutic targets. Finally, it will summarize a strategy to move these targets to a high throughput personalized medicine pipeline for compound screening.
    Close abstract

    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

    Date:
    15
    Sunday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar: Prof. Yair Reisner will lecture on "Hematopoietic and lung stem cell transplantation across major genetic barriers."

    Date:
    10
    Tuesday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Yair Reisner
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    02
    Monday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Title: “Using Systems Approaches to Understand the Mechanism of Disease”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Nevan Krogan
    Organizer: Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

    Departmental Seminar - Molecular Genetics Dept.

    Date:
    01
    Sunday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    The Barry Sherman Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology Seminar Series Transnational Cancer Research

    Date:
    31
    Thursday
    October
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Converging Cancer Genetics, Structural Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Daniel Rauh
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: The Barry Sherman Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology Seminar Series

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    27
    Sunday
    October
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Title: “Non-genetic adaptation to proteotoxic stress.”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Peter Tsvetkov
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Imm Special Guest Seminar: Prof Eystein Husebye, will lecture on "Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 - Lessons from man and mouse"

    Date:
    07
    Monday
    October
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Special Guest Seminar with Anat Zimmer

    Date:
    03
    Thursday
    October
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: "Analyzing PD3 clouds using PAReto Task Inference".
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Anat Zimmer
    Organizer: Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
    Abstract: It is a challenge to answer questions like: why some people develop a disease, r ... Read more It is a challenge to answer questions like: why some people develop a disease, react to a specific treatment and/or develop severe side-effects while others don’t. In order to explain these occurrences, one has to take a holistic approach and study the body physiology from a systems level perspective. Longitudinal multi-omics measurements together with genetics, on a large population, can serve such a purpose and help in predicting, reasoning, and preventing diseases. In partnership with Arivale Inc., we have developed infrastructure to collect longitudinal Personalized Dense Dynamic Data clouds (PD3 clouds) on thousands of individuals, which include genetics and longitudinal measurements of clinical labs, microbiome, metabolome, proteome, and self-reported data. The value of these extremely high-dimensional data clouds is clear; however, it also comprises a challenge in data analysis and interpretation. One way to reduce data dimensionality is called Pareto Task Inference (PARTI, Hart et al. 2015). We used this method to analyze the clinical labs and found that the data falls on a significant tetrahedron. The 4 vertices are archetypes that specialize in a certain task. Using all other datatypes, we identified enriched traits next to every archetype and revealed the underline tradeoffs that shape the data. This distinctive analysis uncovers unexpected relationships between datasets such as metabolomics, proteomics and clinical labs, and helps in interconnecting the different datatypes to characterize different states of human health.
    Close abstract

    Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Johnathan Cooper-Knock

    Date:
    05
    Thursday
    September
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: Unbiased genome-wide screen identifies new ALS risk variants within gene-regulatory elements.
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Johnathan Cooper-Knock
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar with Ophir Shalem

    Date:
    22
    Thursday
    August
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Title: “CRISPR screens, proteostasis and rapid control of proteins at scale”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Ophir Shalem, Ph.D
    Organizer: Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    21
    Sunday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Title: “Spectrin integrates cell adhesion, signaling and growth by modulating endosomal trafficking”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Claire Thomas
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Shoulder Injury Seminar Department of Molecular Genetics

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-12:00
    Title: " Rotator Cuff Tendon Healing in an Animal Model".
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Louis J. Soslowsky, Ph.D
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    16
    Tuesday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: “Nucleic Acid based therapies - from basic science to clinical translation: a view from the Biotech side”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Yael Weiss
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Future Directions in Genetics Education

    Date:
    03
    Wednesday
    July
    2019
    -
    04
    Thursday
    July
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Office of the Vice President for Development and Communications

    The Departments of Immunology and Molecular Genetics- Special Guest Seminar:Dr. Eric Shifrut ,will lecture about "Engineering human T cell therapies using CRISPR discovery platforms”

    Date:
    02
    Tuesday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Eric Shifrut
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    G-INCPM Special Guest Seminar - Dr. Vaclav Navratil, CEO & CTO, DIANA Biotechnologies, s.r.o.

    Date:
    20
    Thursday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: "DIANA: new platform for protein detection and screening of protein ligands"
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Abstract: Recently developed DIANA platform (DNA-linked Inhibitor ANtibody Assay) is suita ... Read more Recently developed DIANA platform (DNA-linked Inhibitor ANtibody Assay) is suitable for both ultrasensitive protein detection in in vitro diagnostics and for enzyme inhibitor or protein ligand screening in drug discovery. As its name suggests, we originally designed DIANA to detect enzymes and its inhibitors, but we later showed that it is well suited also for detection of receptors and its ligands, to screen for protein-protein interaction inhibitors and for detection of small molecules. DIANA overcomes the limitations of current state of the art methods, as it can detect zeptomole amounts of targets, has a linear range of up to six logs and is applicable to biological matrices. Screening of chemical libraries is an important step in drug discovery, but it remains challenging for targets, which are difficult to express and purify, and current methods tend to produce false results. The sensitivity and selectivity of DIANA enables quantitative high-throughput screening of enzyme inhibitors, receptor ligands or inhibitors of protein-protein interactions with unpurified proteins. DIANA addresses also the remaining limitations of the current screening methods, as it allows high-throughput screening with high signal-to-noise ratio (Z’ factor > 0.9), sensitive hit discovery and ultralow rate of false positives (< 0.02%); while quantitatively determining the inhibition potency from a single well and requiring only picogram to nanogram quantities of potentially unpurified protein target (e.g. in human serum). At DIANA Biotechnologies, a recently established spin-off from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry in Prague, we aim to fully exploit the potential of the platform and to become center for development of new diagnostics and drug discovery. We are building up infrastructure for screening and hit to lead conversion, including our own ~150,000 compound library, which we will screen for medicinally relevant targets, taking just one week per target. The most promising compounds will be optimized for potency, selectivity, physical properties, pharmacology profile and in vitro and in vivo efficacy, where DIANA-based high-throughput ADME pharmacology tests can also be applied. In our talk, we will briefly summarize the assay protocol and its performance on model targets, as well as recent developments at DIANA Biotechnologies. We will discuss in more detail examples of current internal projects, mainly of the development of selectivity panels (example of inhibitors of human carbonic anhydrases) and of the first drug discovery project directed on influenza RNA polymerase and its different subunits.
    Close abstract

    Revealing the dynamic stability of fusion pores in giant vesicles through live, super-resolution microscopy

    Date:
    28
    Tuesday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:15
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Tom Biton
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Exocytosis occurs in all living cells and is essential for many cellular process ... Read more Exocytosis occurs in all living cells and is essential for many cellular processes including metabolism, signaling, and trafficking. During exocytosis, cargo loaded vesicles dock and fuse with the plasma membrane to release their content. To accommodate different cargos and cellular needs exocytosis must occur across scales; From synaptic vesicles that are only ~50nm in diameter, and neuroendocrine vesicles that are in the ~500nm range to giant secretory vesicles filled with viscous cargo, such as in the acinar cells in the exocrine pancreas, that reach up to a few µm in diameter. Yet, how fusion and content release are adapted to remain function across these scales is not well understood. It is well established that during exocytosis of small vesicles, vesicle fusion can proceed through one of two pathways: The first is complete incorporation, when the vesicular membrane fuses to the target membrane and the fusion pore expand irreversibly, incorporating the vesicular membrane into the target membrane. The second is “kiss-and-run”, when the fusion pore flickers, opening briefly and collapsing rapidly into two separate membranes. I am interested in understanding how exocytosis occurs in giant vesicles witch challenge efficient secretion and membrane homeostasis due to their massive size and viscous content. I am using the salivary gland of D. Melanogaster, as a model system for giant vesicles secretion. The vesicles in the gland measure between 5-8 µm, fuse and secrete viscous content into a preformed lumen. To visualize the secretion process, I adapted a method for super-resolution microscopy to live-gland imaging. I observed that fusion pores of giant vesicles expand to a stable opening of up to 3µm and slowly constricts down to hundreds of nm or less during secretion. Because constricting a membrane pore from “infinity” in molecular terms, back to a very narrow ‘stalk’ demands an investment of energy, I hypothesized that this is mediated by a specialized protein machinery. I am currently screening for the components of the machinery using the enormous power of Drosophila genetics by taking a candidate gene approach. My preliminary results identify the BAR domain containing protein, MIM (missing in metastasis) as a key regulator of pore dynamics, leading to new and exciting insights into the molecular mechanism of cellular secretion and membrane homeostasis in live tissues.
    Close abstract

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Retreat

    Date:
    14
    Tuesday
    May
    2019
    -
    16
    Thursday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 00:00
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Cross regulation between the apoptotic cascade and the unfolded protein response

    Date:
    13
    Monday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Title: Special guest seminar
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Avi Ashkenazi
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Brain cell type analysis and why it matters for disease

    Date:
    16
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Location: Camelia Botnar Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Jens Hjerling-Leffler
    Organizer: Department of Brain Sciences
    Details: Host: Dr.Ivo Spiegel ivo.spiegel@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4415 For assistance ... Read more Host: Dr.Ivo Spiegel ivo.spiegel@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4415 For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    Close details
    Abstract: Cellular complexity in the brain has been a central area of study since the birt ... Read more Cellular complexity in the brain has been a central area of study since the birth of cellular neuroscience over a hundred years ago. Several different classification systems have been put forward based on emerging techniques. It is still largely unclear if and how the classification system produced using recent single-cell transcriptomics corresponds to previous classification systems. The interneurons of the hippocampus has been extensively characterised on physiological and morphological basis and we used this classification as a basis to compare single-cell RNA sequencing data from the CA1 hippocampus. We show, using the in situ sequencing technique “pciSeq” that the predictions made from scRNAseq data corresponds existing classification. Furthermore, we leverage the rich data from scRNAseq and combined it with GWAS data from patients to begin to elucidate the cellular origin of genetic heritability of brain disorders. Although many of these disorders are genetically complex it seems that specific and sometimes non-overlapping cell types underlie the ethology of these disorders. For instance we show a largely ignored role of oligodendrocytes in Parkinson’s disease which can be confirmed in patient material. This proves the feasibility to link modern transcriptomics with genetics to leverage the recent advances in understanding of genetic structure of brain disorders to yield actionable targets.
    Close abstract

    Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Markus Mund

    Date:
    16
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Title: Studying dynamics and endocytosis in the native tissue context
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Markus Mund
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    The genetics of epigenetics

    Date:
    16
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Magnus Nordborg
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Tal Dahan If you wish to meet Prof. Nordborg, please contact tal.dahan@we ... Read more Host: Tal Dahan If you wish to meet Prof. Nordborg, please contact tal.dahan@weizmann.ac.il
    Close details
    Abstract: Epigenetics continues to fascinate, especially the notion that it blurs the line ... Read more Epigenetics continues to fascinate, especially the notion that it blurs the line between “nature and nurture” and could make Lamarckian adaptation via the inheritance of acquired characteristics possible. That this is in principle possible is clear: in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress), experimentally induced DNA methylation variation can be inherited and affect important traits. The question is whether this is important in nature. Recent studies of A. thaliana have revealed a pattern of correlation between levels of methylation and climate variables that strongly suggests that methylation is important in adaptation. However, somewhat paradoxically, the experiments also showed that much of the variation for this epigenetic trait appears to have a genetic rather than an epigenetic basis. This suggest that epigenetics may indeed be important for adaptation, but as part of a genetic mechanism that is currently not understood. Genome-wide association studies revealed a striking genetic architecture of methylation variation, involving major-effect polymorphisms in many genes involved in silencing, and this can be utilized to determine whether the global pattern of methylation variation has a genetic or an epigenetic cause, and to elucidate the ultimate cause of the global pattern of variation: natural selection.
    Close abstract

    Imm Special Guest Seminar:Prof. Jo Van Ginderachter, will lecture on "Macrophages in the healthy and the tumor-bearing brain: linking single-cell transcriptomics to function."

    Date:
    16
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Jo Van Ginderachter
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Genetics, HSP expressomics and proteomics to understand how plants feel the heat and meet the challenges of global warming

    Date:
    15
    Monday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Pierre Goloubinoff
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Meir Edelman

    Special Guest Seminar with prof. Johannes Herrmann

    Date:
    11
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Title: Mitochondrial Biogenesis: A huge challenge for eukaryotic cells
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Johannes Herrmann
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special guest seminar

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Andrea Pauli
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics seminar for thesis defense

    Date:
    26
    Tuesday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: “Is RPTPa a novel target that counteracts obesity?”
    Location: Koshland Room
    Lecturer: Yael Cohen Sharir
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Department of Molecular Genetics seminar for thesis defense

    Date:
    19
    Tuesday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: “Proliferation Limitations in the Budding Yeast”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Eyal Metzl Raz
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Pattern restoration for wound healing in plants

    Date:
    17
    Sunday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Jiri Friml
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Asaph Aharoni

    Department of Molecular Genetics seminar for thesis defense

    Date:
    17
    Sunday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Title: “Identification of the IDPs sequence motifs conferring targeting to the 20S proteasome-PSMA3 and p21 model”
    Location: Belfer room 325
    Lecturer: Marianna Riutin
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Vav1: A Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde protein--good for the hematopoietic system, bad for cancer

    Date:
    14
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Shulamit Katzav-Shapira
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    MM Special Guest Seminar: Hiderou Yoshida, Ph. D., will lecture about "New insights into ER- and Golgi- stress responses."

    Date:
    13
    Wednesday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Hiderou Yoshida, Ph. D.
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Designing precision nanomedicines to diagnose, excise and treat melanoma brain metastases in three dimensions

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

    Date:
    24
    Sunday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Eden Yifrach
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Imm Special Guest Seminar:Dr. Fernando Racimo and Dr. Martin Sikora

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Fernando Racimo and Dr. Martin Sikora
    Organizer: Department of Immunology
    Details: 11:00-11:30-Dr. Fernando Racimo will lecture on "Detecting Loci under positive s ... Read more 11:00-11:30-Dr. Fernando Racimo will lecture on "Detecting Loci under positive selection in complex populations." 11:30-12:00-Dr. Martin Sikora will lecture on "The Leftovers- Large-scale screening for pathogens in thousands of ancient human genomes."
    Close details

    Frustrations in the treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Uziel Beller
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Evolution of cell fusion

    Date:
    31
    Thursday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Benjmain Podbilewicz
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

    Date:
    27
    Sunday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 00:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Maayan Barnea
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Gain Fat - Lose Metastasis: From cancer cell plasticity to differentiation theraphy

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Dana Ishay Ronen
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Joel S. Bader

    Date:
    23
    Wednesday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Title: “Identifying drivers of breast cancer metastasis”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Joel S. Bader
    Organizer: The Kahn Family Research Center for Systems Biology of the Human Cell
    Abstract: Most breast cancer deaths are from metastasis, rather than growth of the primary ... Read more Most breast cancer deaths are from metastasis, rather than growth of the primary tumor. Therapies for reducing deaths from metastatic cancer are limited, in part because much of the basic biology of metastasis remains unknown. We are developing and applying methods to identify these basic mechanisms. We describe work with experimental and clinical partners using organoids, clusters of 300-500 primary mammary cells, to interrogate metastasis-related phenotypes. We present new mathematical image processing methods that convert organoid images into quantitative invasion phenotypes. We then discuss genes and pathways whose activities lead to invasion, dissemination, and metastasis. Often the driver and effector genes are poor candidates for therapeutic intervention, but signaling intermediates can be targeted. We are prioritizing intermediates using new methods that characterize the density of paths through a biological network. We are recruiting women with breast cancer to participate in these studies as part of our US NCI Cancer Target Discovery & Development (CTD2) Center.
    Close abstract

    Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Meytal Landau

    Date:
    22
    Tuesday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Title: Functional Protein Fibrils as Antibacterial Agents and Targets
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Meytal Landau
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar with Dan Bracha

    Date:
    17
    Thursday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00-13:00
    Title: “Optogenetic Protein Droplets: Mapping and Moving Through Intracellular Phase Space”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dan Bracha
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Special Guest Seminar with Ariel Schwartz

    Date:
    17
    Thursday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Title: “Deep Semantic Genome and Protein Representation for Annotation, Discovery, and Engineering”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Ariel Schwartz
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Abstract: Computational assignment of function to proteins with no known homologs is still ... Read more Computational assignment of function to proteins with no known homologs is still an unsolved problem. We have created a novel, function-based approach to protein annotation and discovery called D-SPACE (Deep Semantic Protein Annotation Classification and Exploration), comprised of a multi-task, multi-label deep neural network trained on over 70 million proteins. Distinct from homology and motif-based methods, D-SPACE encodes proteins in high-dimensional representations (embeddings), allowing the accurate assignment of over 180,000 labels for 13 distinct tasks. The embedding representation enables fast searches for functionally related proteins, including homologs undetectable by traditional approaches. D-SPACE annotates all 109 million proteins in UniProt in under 35 hours on a single computer and searches the entirety of these in seconds. D-SPACE further quantifies the relative functional effect of mutations, facilitating rapid in-silico mutagenesis for protein engineering applications. D-SPACE incorporates protein annotation, search, and other exploratory efforts into a single cohesive model. We have recently extended this work from protein to DNA, enabling assignment of function to whole genomes and metagenomic contigs in seconds. Conserved genomic motifs as well as the functional impact of mutations in coding as well as non-coding genomic regions can be predicted directly from raw DNA sequence without the use of traditional comparative genomics approaches for motif detection, such as multiple sequence alignments, PSSMs, and profile HMMs.
    Close abstract

    Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Shai Carmi

    Date:
    16
    Wednesday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Shai Carmi
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Abstract: In this talk, I will review recent work by myself and others on Jewish populatio ... Read more In this talk, I will review recent work by myself and others on Jewish population and medical genetics, focusing on Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). I will describe the mixture events of AJ in Europe, the founder event they have experienced in the late Middle Ages, and their connections to ancient populations of the Levant. I will then describe large-scale genomic databases that we have recently generated for AJ, and the opportunities they open in medical genetics given the unique AJ demographic history. I will describe a few medical genetics projects including carrier screening, genome-wide association studies of microbiome composition and other traits, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.
    Close abstract

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

    Date:
    13
    Sunday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Julie Tai
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Post - transcriptional Control of Host Gene Expression During Viral infection

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Noam Stern-Ginossar
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

    Date:
    06
    Sunday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Adi Millman
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

    Date:
    06
    Sunday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Adi Millman
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    TBA

    Date:
    03
    Thursday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Katrien Vandoorne, PhD, DVM
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation