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Cancer ImmunoMetabolism 2021

Date:
11
Sunday
September
2022
-
14
Wednesday
September
2022
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Past

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    Departmental Seminar with Lena Sapoznikov

    Date:
    09
    Sunday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-13:30
    Title: The Interplay Between Regulation of Cell Migration and Invasion by Caspases, EMT Signaling and Cellular Metabolism
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Lena Sapoznikov
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99788562655?pwd=K25ZenlWOUdtRWlxd2hTb2FLcGg5dz09 Mee ... Read more https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99788562655?pwd=K25ZenlWOUdtRWlxd2hTb2FLcGg5dz09 Meeting ID: 997 8856 2655 Password: 491284
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    Clinical development of mRNA vaccines and therapeutics: COVID and beyond

    Date:
    09
    Sunday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:15-10:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium
    Lecturer: Dr. Tal Zaks
    Details: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94905298503
    Abstract: mRNA based vaccines prevent COVID-19 infections, putting them at the forefront o ... Read more mRNA based vaccines prevent COVID-19 infections, putting them at the forefront of the current global fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. The scientific and clinical development of mRNA medicines, which began in ernest only ~10 years ago, has the potential to not only change the landscape of infectious disease vaccines but to also impact the treatment of cancer, genetic metabolic, autoimmune, and cardiovascular diseases. This talk will review the translational medicine approach to the research and development of both infectious disease vaccines, as exemplified by COVID-19 vaccine Moderna, as well as other applications of mRNA medicines currently in clinical development. ᐧ
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    Examples of method development for targeted metabolic analysis using LC-MS

    Date:
    06
    Thursday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00
    Location: via ZOOM
    Lecturer: Dr. Alexander Brandis
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    Therapeutic Exploitation of Metabolic Vulnerabilities of Cancer

    Date:
    22
    Thursday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Eyal Gottlieb
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Dissecting the functional organization of sensory neurons in gut-brain communication

    Date:
    13
    Tuesday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:30
    Lecturer: Dr. Henning Fenselau
    Organizer: Department of Neurobiology
    Details: Zoom link to join-https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUd ... Read more Zoom link to join-https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09 Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618 Password: 564068 Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070
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    Abstract: Sensory neurons relay gut-derived signals to the brain, and thereby contribute ... Read more Sensory neurons relay gut-derived signals to the brain, and thereby contribute to systemic energy and glucose homeostasis regulation. However, the relevant sensory neuronal populations innervating the gut along with the pertaining underlying functional neurocircuits remain poorly understood. Advances in this field have been impeded by the challenges associated with targeting distinct sensory neurons of vagal and spinal origin in a cell-type-specific manner, thereby making the accurate determination of their function highly difficult. We employ a combinatorial set of modern molecular systems neuroscience tools and novel mouse genetic approaches to elucidate the role of molecularly defined sensory neurons in feeding behavior and glucose metabolism, and map their downstream neurocircuits in the brain. The overarching goal of our studies is to gain greater insights into the integral components of sensory neurons as gut-to-brain connectors in controlling metabolism. Zoom link to join- https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96608033618?pwd=SEdJUkR2ZzRBZ3laUUdGbWR1VFJTdz09 Meeting ID: 966 0803 3618 Password: 564068 Host: Dr. Rita Schmidt rita.schmidt@weizmann.ac.il tel: 9070
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    Inflammation, Metabolism and Immunity in Liver Cancer: From Pathogenesis to Treatment

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Lecturer: Dr. Michael Karin
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    "Beyond Weight Watchers: The Tools of the Metabolic Phenotyping Unit" - Dr. Yael Kuperman - Spotlight on Science

    Date:
    24
    Wednesday
    February
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Lecturer: Dr. Yael Kuperman
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    Seminar for PhD thesis defense - Lior Lasman

    Date:
    24
    Wednesday
    February
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Title: "The Role of m6A RNA Modification Reader Proteins Ythdf1, Ythdf2 and Ythdf3 in mRNA Metabolism, ESC Differentiation and Development"
    Location: Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84921855732
    Lecturer: Lior Lasman
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    “Low-field MRI: new perspectives”

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Lecturer: Prof. Najat Salameh
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Zoom: Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98957854014?pwd=ZTEyazd6cThxUE90L3ZJbkdkb ... Read more Zoom: Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98957854014?pwd=ZTEyazd6cThxUE90L3ZJbkdkbkFWQT09 passcode: 159170 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-ionizing, non-invasive imaging modality that has become key in modern medicine. Its high value resides in a broad range of soft tissue contrasts or biomarkers that can be tuned to enable the identification and follow-up of many pathophysiological or metabolic processes. Such developments were made possible thanks to almost forty years of hardware and software development, yet access to MRI nowadays remains exclusive, bound to radiology suites in hospitals, and restricted to less than half of the world population. This limited accessibility is mostly due to its one-fits-all design and its prerequisites for intense magnetic field strength that impact cost, siting infrastructure, and clinical compatibility. One way to improve accessibility in MRI is to lower the magnetic field strength that will naturally influence cost, siting, and compatibility. Further, lowering the field strength can translate in smaller footprint designs which geometry and contrast could purposely be tuned to certain targeted applications. Indeed, relaxation mechanisms are known to change with the surrounding magnetic field, with larger T1 dispersion at low field that have for the most part been unexplored. Although very promising, many challenges arise linked to the lower intrinsic nuclear spin polarization inherent to low field technologies, calling for original and innovative approaches to reach clinical relevance. During this seminar, Prof. Najat Salameh will describe those challenges and possible solutions by presenting the current landscape of low field imaging and recent progress made at the Center for Adaptable MRI Technology, Basel University.
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    MicroEco 2020

    Date:
    06
    Wednesday
    January
    2021
    -
    07
    Thursday
    January
    2021
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    The hyperpolarized brain: What can we add to cerebral metabolism with hyperpolarized MR probes?

    Date:
    17
    Thursday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Lecturer: Dr. Mor Mishkovsky
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science

    Dept. Seminar by Zoom - Plant and Environmental Sciences Dept.

    Date:
    17
    Tuesday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Title: A Highjacked Component of the Primary Cell Wall Biosynthesis Machinery Functions in Plant Terpenoid Metabolism
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96819365636?pwd=K2NLWGZhOHByenBheHFkeHhIUHlLZz09 Meeting ID: 968 1936 5636 Password: 578658
    Lecturer: Dr. Adam Jozwiak
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Dr. Assaf Gal

    The Tremendous Potential of Algal Metabolic Diversity

    Date:
    26
    Wednesday
    August
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: BY ZOOM-Password 553682
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96091452779?pwd=TlJLQ3ZzK0NjVHBYN3BTZ2ZuVjFBQT09
    Lecturer: Dr. Haim Treves
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Assaf Vardi

    The primary role of NAFLD in metabolic syndrome

    Date:
    16
    Monday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Robert Lustig
    Organizer: Life Sciences

    From Cognition to Depression: Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Study In-vivo Neurochemistry

    Date:
    03
    Tuesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:30
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Dr. Assaf Tal
    Organizer: Department of Neurobiology
    Details: Host: Dr. Meital Oren meital.oren@weizmann.ac.il tel: 6479 For assistance wit ... Read more Host: Dr. Meital Oren meital.oren@weizmann.ac.il tel: 6479 For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
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    Abstract: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to measure the in-vivo concent ... Read more Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to measure the in-vivo concentrations of several metabolites in the brain non-invasively. I will present our work using MRS to study two aspects of brain metabolism. First, I'll talk about our work on functional MRS, whereby we look at neurochemical changes during or after learning or function. In the second half of the talk, I will focus on new methods we're developing in the lab, and in particular on our ability to measure the thermal relaxation times of metabolites, which probe specific cellular and subcellular microenvironments. I will present some preliminary data showing where and how this could be useful.
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    Store operated Ca2+ entry regulatory factor (SARAF) alters murine metabolic state, affects proliferation and murine behavior

    Date:
    03
    Tuesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Diana Gataulin
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Store operated calcium entry (SOCE) is an important process aimed at refilling c ... Read more Store operated calcium entry (SOCE) is an important process aimed at refilling cellular internal Ca2+ stores and a major driver of cellular signaling via transcription factors entry to the nucleus. SARAF (SOCE associated regulatory factor) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein, which promotes SOCE inactivation and prevents Ca2+ overfilling of the cell (Palty R. et. al. (2012)). By examining conditional SARAF knock-out mice we revealed site-specific functions for SARAF; including influences on motor function, anxiety, proliferation and a major impact on the metabolic state of the mice. SARAF ablation was found to alter both global and cellular functions, such as proliferation and gene expression. Our findings greatly expand the body of knowledge regarding the biology of the SOCE negative regulator SARAF, as they shed light on its in-vivo physiological function. These discoveries have a significant impact on our understanding of SOCE involvement in metabolic and behavioral phenotypes.
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    Rewiring cellular metabolism: novel insights into the role of estrogen receptor activating mutations in breast cancer

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ido Wolf
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Store operated Ca2+ entry regulatory factor (SARAF) alters murine metabolic state, affects proliferation and murine behavior

    Date:
    07
    Tuesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Diana Gataulin
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Store operated calcium entry (SOCE) is an important process aimed at refilling c ... Read more Store operated calcium entry (SOCE) is an important process aimed at refilling cellular internal Ca2+ stores and a major driver of cellular signaling via transcription factors entry to the nucleus. SARAF (SOCE associated regulatory factor) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein, which promotes SOCE inactivation and prevents Ca2+ overfilling of the cell (Palty R. et. al. (2012)). By examining conditional SARAF knock-out mice we revealed site-specific functions for SARAF; including influences on motor function, anxiety, proliferation and a major impact on the metabolic state of the mice. SARAF ablation was found to alter both global and cellular functions, such as proliferation and gene expression. Our findings greatly expand the body of knowledge regarding the biology of the SOCE negative regulator SARAF, as they shed light on its in-vivo physiological function. These discoveries have a significant impact on our understanding of SOCE involvement in metabolic and behavioral phenotypes.
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    Proteomics of Melanoma Response to Immunotherapy Reveals Dependence on Mitochondrial Metabolism

    Date:
    02
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Tamar Geiger
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Genetic Metabolic Disorders Get-Together

    Date:
    26
    Tuesday
    November
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:00-17:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Uncovering the metabolic landscape of host-virus interactions of the bloom-forming alga Emiliania huxleyi

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: PHD Thesis Defense
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Guy Schleyer
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Auditorium - Floor 1

    Stress-induced psychiatric disorders: A symphony of molecular and cellular mechanisms

    Date:
    05
    Tuesday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Alon Chen
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: The biological response to stress is concerned with the maintenance of homeostas ... Read more The biological response to stress is concerned with the maintenance of homeostasis in the presence of real or perceived challenges. This process requires numerous adaptive responses, involving changes in the central nervous and neuroendocrine systems. When a situation is perceived as stressful, the brain activates many neuronal mechanisms and circuits, linking centers involved in sensory, motor, autonomic, neuroendocrine, cognitive, and emotional functions in order to adapt to the demand. However, the details of the pathways by which the brain translates stressful stimuli into the final, integrated biological response are not completely understood. Nevertheless, it is clear that dysregulation of these physiological responses to stress can have severe psychological and physiological consequences, and there is substantial evidence to suggest that inappropriate regulation, disproportional intensity, or chronic and/or irreversible activation of the stress response is linked to the etiology and pathophysiology of anxiety, depression and metabolic-related disorders. The lecture will review our recent knowledge and findings of stress response neurobiology and stress-induced psychiatric disorders.
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    Mapping and designing metabolic interactions in microbial communities

    Date:
    25
    Wednesday
    September
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Daniel Segrè
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences

    Ribosomal decoding, tRNA modifications and human disease

    Date:
    23
    Monday
    September
    2019
    Colloquium
    Time: 11:00-12:15
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Eric Westhof
    Organizer: Faculty of Chemistry
    Abstract: Decoding during ribosomal translation occurs through complex and interdependent ... Read more Decoding during ribosomal translation occurs through complex and interdependent molecular recognition networks between mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA. Among those, the stability of codon-anticodon triplets, the fold of the tRNA anticodon hairpin, the modified nucleotides, and the interactions with rRNA bases at the decoding site cosntitute key contributors. On the basis of biochemical and genetic data in the literature, coupled with many crystal structures of fully active ribosomes, nucleotide modifications at positions 34 and 37 of the anticodon loop are now understood molecularly. Both pre-organize the anticodon loop for efficient mRNA binding. The modifications at 37 stabilize AU-rich codon-anticodon pairs and maintain the coding frame. The modifications at 34 help to avoid miscoding and allow to decode purine-ending codons in split codon boxes by promoting base pairing that can be accommodated within the structural constraints of the ribosomal grip at the decoding site. Depending on the codon box, the tRNA modifications allow for diversity in codon usage depending on genomic GC content as well as on the number and types of isoacceptor tRNAs. Although universal, the genetic code is not translated identically and differences exist not only between organisms in the three kingdoms of life but also between cellular types. To decipher diversely but efficiently the genetic code, cells developed sophisticated arrays between tRNA pools and tRNA modifications, anchored in the cellular metabolic enzymatic pathways and guaranteeing protein homeostasis. Examples of mutations leading to specific human diseases in some of those enzymes will be described.
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    Learning how to make new β cells: molecular mechanisms underlying reprogramming of exocrine pancreas cells into insulin-producing β cells

    Date:
    18
    Tuesday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Ofer Elhanani
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Diabetes is a life-threatening disease caused by insufficient circulating insuli ... Read more Diabetes is a life-threatening disease caused by insufficient circulating insulin, a key metabolic hormone produced by pancreatic β cells. A promising approach to diabetes treatment is cell replacement therapy, yet this is currently limited by shortage of donor β cells. To address this, direct reprogramming of somatic non-β cells has been suggested as a potential source of β cells. The goal of this research is to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of reprogramming to β cells. We developed and characterized an in vitro system for reprogramming of primary mouse pancreatic acinar cells to β-like cells. Reprogrammed cells exhibit many similarities to native β-cells. Furthermore, this system allowed the identification of the transcriptional repressor REST (RE-1 silencing transcription factor) as a novel regulator of reprogramming which acts by modifying the chromatin around endocrine gene enhancers, thereby altering accessibility and function of endocrine transcription factors. Improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying reprogramming are essential to permit its application in the future for regenerative and cell therapy-based treatment of diabetes.
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    Revealing the dynamic stability of fusion pores in giant vesicles through live, super-resolution microscopy

    Date:
    28
    Tuesday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:15
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Tom Biton
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Exocytosis occurs in all living cells and is essential for many cellular process ... Read more Exocytosis occurs in all living cells and is essential for many cellular processes including metabolism, signaling, and trafficking. During exocytosis, cargo loaded vesicles dock and fuse with the plasma membrane to release their content. To accommodate different cargos and cellular needs exocytosis must occur across scales; From synaptic vesicles that are only ~50nm in diameter, and neuroendocrine vesicles that are in the ~500nm range to giant secretory vesicles filled with viscous cargo, such as in the acinar cells in the exocrine pancreas, that reach up to a few µm in diameter. Yet, how fusion and content release are adapted to remain function across these scales is not well understood. It is well established that during exocytosis of small vesicles, vesicle fusion can proceed through one of two pathways: The first is complete incorporation, when the vesicular membrane fuses to the target membrane and the fusion pore expand irreversibly, incorporating the vesicular membrane into the target membrane. The second is “kiss-and-run”, when the fusion pore flickers, opening briefly and collapsing rapidly into two separate membranes. I am interested in understanding how exocytosis occurs in giant vesicles witch challenge efficient secretion and membrane homeostasis due to their massive size and viscous content. I am using the salivary gland of D. Melanogaster, as a model system for giant vesicles secretion. The vesicles in the gland measure between 5-8 µm, fuse and secrete viscous content into a preformed lumen. To visualize the secretion process, I adapted a method for super-resolution microscopy to live-gland imaging. I observed that fusion pores of giant vesicles expand to a stable opening of up to 3µm and slowly constricts down to hundreds of nm or less during secretion. Because constricting a membrane pore from “infinity” in molecular terms, back to a very narrow ‘stalk’ demands an investment of energy, I hypothesized that this is mediated by a specialized protein machinery. I am currently screening for the components of the machinery using the enormous power of Drosophila genetics by taking a candidate gene approach. My preliminary results identify the BAR domain containing protein, MIM (missing in metastasis) as a key regulator of pore dynamics, leading to new and exciting insights into the molecular mechanism of cellular secretion and membrane homeostasis in live tissues.
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    Neuronal membrane proteasomes and their released extracellular peptides modulate nervous system signaling

    Date:
    26
    Sunday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Seth S. Margolis
    Organizer: Department of Neurobiology
    Details: Host: Dr.Ivo Spiegel ivo.spiegel@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4415 For assistance with ... Read more Host: Dr.Ivo Spiegel ivo.spiegel@weizmann.ac.il tel: 4415 For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
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    Abstract: In mammals, activity-dependent changes in neuronal function require coordinated ... Read more In mammals, activity-dependent changes in neuronal function require coordinated regulation of the protein synthesis and protein degradation machinery. However, the biochemical evidence for this balance and coordination is largely lacking. To investigate this we initially used acute metabolic radiolabeling of stimulated primary mouse neurons to follow the fate of polypeptides being newly synthesized. We observed polypeptides being newly translated exclusively during neuronal stimulation were rapidly degraded by the neuronal membrane proteasome (NMP) and not the cytosolic proteasome. This turnover correlated with enhanced production of NMP-derived peptides into the extracellular space which have the capacity to mediate neuronal signaling in part through NMDA receptors. Using in-depth, global, and unbiased mass spectrometry, we identified the nascent protein substrates of the NMP. Among these substrates, we found that immediate-early gene products c-Fos and Npas4 were targeted to the NMP during ongoing activity-dependent protein synthesis. Moreover, we found that turnover of nascent polypeptides and not full-length proteins through the NMP occurred independent of canonical ubiquitylation pathways. We propose that these findings generally define a neuronal activity-induced protein homeostasis program of coordinated protein synthesis and degradation through the NMP. This generates a new modality of neuronal signaling in the form of extracellular peptides with potential significance for our understanding of nervous system development and function.
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    Metabolism Revisited

    Date:
    23
    Thursday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Joshua Rabinowitz
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Functions and multitrophic effects of plant secondary metabolites in cereals

    Date:
    21
    Tuesday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Matthias Erb
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Dan Even If you wish to meet Prof. Erb, please contact Dan at dan.even@we ... Read more Host: Dan Even If you wish to meet Prof. Erb, please contact Dan at dan.even@weizmann.ac.il
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    Abstract: Small molecular weight organic compounds are common across the galaxy and transc ... Read more Small molecular weight organic compounds are common across the galaxy and transcend all known biological interactions. Plants, in particular, have evolved a remarkable capacity to produce diverse sets of so-called specialized metabolites from a few simple, inorganic precursors. Already in 1977, Rhoades argued that plant specialized metabolites are likely multifunctional, i.e. that they serve multiple purposes. Multifunctionality may render the production of specialized metabolites more cost effective and may explain their abundance and tight spatiotemporal control in plants. Work over the last decades confirms that specialized metabolites often have a broad range of functions, from growth and development to defense. However, our understanding of how this multifunctionality affects the interactions between plants and higher trophic levels, including herbivores and their natural enemies is limited. In my presentation, I will explore the importance of multifunctional plant metabolites in a multitrophic context by discussing our work on benzoxazinoids, the most abundant specialized metabolites in grasses such as wheat and maize. We find that benzoxazinoids act as direct defenses [1], within-plant defense signaling molecules [2], microbiome modulators [3] and siderophores [4]. At the same time, the western corn rootworm, a specialist maize pest and important agricultural pest, exploits benzoxazinoids as foraging cues [4], protective agents [5] and micronutrient providers [4]. Thus, the multifunctionality of plant specialized metabolites is mirrored in the adaptations of a specialist herbivore, resulting in a tightly interlocked metabolism. We are also starting to unravel how the metabolism of herbivore natural enemies such as entomopathogenic nematodes can be interlocked with the plant and the herbivore to enhance biological control. These findings have implications for our understanding of the ecology and evolution of plant specialized metabolites, and for their use in agricultural pest control.
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    The gut microbiome and metabolic disorders

    Date:
    05
    Sunday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Hagit Shapiro
    Organizer: Life Sciences

    Applying cancer unique metabolism for patients’ diagnosis and therapy

    Date:
    11
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Ayelet Erez
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    The mitochondrial protein Efhd1 is regulated by Liver Kinase B1 and is required for neuronal development

    Date:
    26
    Tuesday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Valeria Ulisse
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: During development, neurons need to couple their robust axonal growth with their ... Read more During development, neurons need to couple their robust axonal growth with their energetic balance. The mechanisms that regulate this coupling are largely unknown. Here we show that sensory neurons that lack Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1), a master regulator of energy homeostasis, exhibit reduced axonal growth and branching. Biochemical analysis of these LKB1 KO neurons revealed metabolic irregularities, manifested by axonal reduction in ATP levels. Genomic analysis uncovered downregulation in Efhd1 (EF-Hand Domain Family Member D1), a mitochondrial Ca2+-binding protein in the LKB1 KO sensory neurons. Strikingly, genetic ablation of Efhd1 caused a decrease in the axonal ATP levels and activation of the AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) pathway in sensory neurons. Moreover, we detected shortened mitochondria at the axonal growth cones and activation of the mitophagy regulator ULK (Unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase). Suggesting that Efhd1 is an important regulator of the axonal mitochondria. Notably, these metabolic dysfunctions were manifested by reduced axonal growth in vitro, and axonal branching defects and enhanced neuronal death in vivo. Overall, our work uncovers a new metabolic pathway that couples mitochondrial and axonal growth through Efhd1.
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    Are you stressed? The molecular framework of the nutritional alarmones (p)ppGpp

    Date:
    26
    Tuesday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Gert Bange
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: The ability of bacteria to adapt their metabolism to nutrient limitation or envi ... Read more The ability of bacteria to adapt their metabolism to nutrient limitation or environmental changes is essential for survival. The stringent response is a highly conserved mechanism that enables bacteria to respond to nutrient limitations. Central to stringent response is the synthesis of the nutritional alarmones pppGpp and ppGpp (collectively named: (p)ppGpp) that globally reprograms transcription and translation associated to variety of different cellular processes. In Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, three types of alarmone synthases (i.e., RelA, SAS1 and SAS2) have been identified that differ in length and domain composition. These differences might be attributed to their specific roles during stringent response. However, only little information on the molecular details is known. I will present our recent progress towards the structural/mechanistic understanding of the molecular framework of alarmone response.
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    IMM Guest seminar- Prof. Peter J. Murray will lecture on "Immune regulation by amino acid metabolism."

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:30
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Peter J. Murray
    Organizer: Department of Immunology