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    Emergence of Complexity in Chiral Nanostructures

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    October
    2021
    Colloquium
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Nicholas A. Kotov
    Organizer: Faculty of Chemistry
    Abstract: The structural complexity of composite biomaterials and biomineralized particles ... Read more The structural complexity of composite biomaterials and biomineralized particles arises from the hierarchical ordering of inorganic building blocks over multiple scales. While empirical observations of complex nanoassemblies are abundant, physicochemical mechanisms leading to their geometrical complexity are still puzzling, especially for non-uniformly sized components. These mechanisms are discussed in this talk taking an example of hierarchically organized particles with twisted spikes and other morphologies from polydisperse Au-Cys nanoplatelets [1]. The complexity of these supraparticles is higher than biological counterparts or other complex particles as enumerated by graph theory (GT). Complexity Index (CI) and other GT parameters are applied to a variety of different nanoscale materials to assess their structural organization. As the result of this analysis, we determined that intricate organization Au-Cys supraparticles emerges from competing chirality-dependent assembly restrictions that render assembly pathways primarily dependent on nanoparticle symmetry rather than size. These findings open a pathway to a large family of colloids with complex architectures and unusual chiroptical and chemical properties. The GT-based design principles for complex chiral nanoassemblies are extended to engineer drug discovery platforms for Alzheimer syndrome [3], materials for chiral photonics, vaccines, and antivirals. Developed GT methods were applied to the design of complex biomimetic composites for energy and robotics applications [2,4] will be shown as a nucleus for discussions. References [1] W. Jiang, Z.-B. et al, Emergence of Complexity in Hierarchically Organized Chiral Particles, Science, 2020, 368, 6491, 642-648. [2] Wang, M.; Vecchio, D.; et al Biomorphic Structural Batteries for Robotics. Sci. Robot. 2020, 5 (45), eaba1912. https://doi.org/10.1126/scirobotics.aba1912. [3] Jun Lu, et al, Enhanced optical asymmetry in supramolecular chiroplasmonic assemblies with long-range order, Science, 2021, 371, 6536, 1368 [4] D. Vecchio et al, Structural Analysis of Nanoscale Network Materials Using Graph Theory, ACS Nano 2021, 15, 8, 12847–12859.
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    Coherent Network Computing 2020 (CNC2020)

    Date:
    13
    Monday
    July
    2020
    -
    16
    Thursday
    July
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium
    Organizer: Crown Photonics Center

    Cut along dotted line: kirigami materials and device applications

    Date:
    10
    Wednesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Max Shtein
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Simple 2-dimensional cut and fold patterns can be transformed into 3-dimensional ... Read more Simple 2-dimensional cut and fold patterns can be transformed into 3-dimensional shapes upon stretch-ing. We use this simple approach to develop mechanical metamaterials with several interesting proper-ties and applications. I will describe ways of tuning properties via geometric structure, and discuss ex-amples of how this can be used to achieve superior performance in mechanics, photonics, electronics, sensors, and other areas. References: “Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.” Nature Comm. 6, 8092 (2015) “A kirigami approach to engineering elasticity in nanocomposites through patterned defects.” Na-ture Mater., 14 (2015) 785 “An Electric Eel-Inspired Artificial Soft Power Source from Stacked Hydrogels.” Nature, 552 (2017) 214
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    Quantum photonics for a new level of computer security and enhanced quantum computer architectures

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Colloquium
    Time: 11:15-12:30
    Location: Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Philip Walter
    Organizer: Faculty of Physics
    Abstract: The precise quantum control of single photons, together with the intrinsic advan ... Read more The precise quantum control of single photons, together with the intrinsic advantage of being mobile make optical quantum system ideally suited for delegated quantum information tasks, reaching from well-established quantum cryptography to quantum clouds and quantum computer networks. Here I present that the exploit of quantum photonics allows for a variety of quantum-enhanced data security for quantum and classical computers. The latter is based on feasible hybrid classical-quantum technology, which shows promising new applications of readily available quantum photonics technology for complex data processing. At the end I will also show how optical quantum computers allow for novel architectures that rely on superimposed order of quantum gates. As outlook I will discuss technological challenges for the scale up of photonic quantum computers, and our group’s current work for addressing some of those.
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