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    Microbiota and cancer treatment - an ecological journey

    Date:
    29
    Thursday
    June
    2023
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Ben Boursi
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Microbiome Metabolites: Syntheses and Surprises

    Date:
    06
    Tuesday
    June
    2023
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Karl Gademann
    Organizer: Department of Chemical and Structural Biology

    Special guest seminar

    Date:
    04
    Sunday
    June
    2023
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 00:00
    Title: T cell memory, metabolism and the microbiome
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Professor Sammy Bedoui
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology

    A meta'omics perspective on the functional potential and regulation of metabolic activity in the global ocean microbiome

    Date:
    31
    Tuesday
    January
    2023
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Shinichi Sunagawa
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Dr. David Zeevi

    Microbiome Therapeutics to Enhance Anti-Cancer Immunity

    Date:
    09
    Wednesday
    November
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Sin-Hyeog IM
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Trying to understand how plant-microbiome cooperation evolved(s)

    Date:
    21
    Tuesday
    June
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Omri Finkel Dudi
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Dr. David Zeevi

    Host innate immunity and bacterial commensals prevent fungal dysbiosis in Arabidopsis roots

    Date:
    12
    Tuesday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Location: VIA ZOOM: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98989152393?pwd=a050Mm4rSlEwb2hLN1FiKy9oT24xdz09 Meeting ID: 989 8915 2393 Password: 002663
    Lecturer: Prof. Stéphane Hacquard
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Dr. Daniel Dar
    Abstract: Understanding how host–microbe homeostasis is controlled and maintained in pla ... Read more Understanding how host–microbe homeostasis is controlled and maintained in plant roots is key to enhance plant productivity. However, the factors that contribute to the maintenance of this equilibrium between plant roots and their multikingdom microbial communities remain largely unknown. Using a microbiota deconstruction-reconstruction approach in gnotobiotic plant systems with synthetic, yet representative communities of bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes, we observe a link between fungal assemblages/load in roots and plant health. We show that modulation of fungal abundance in roots is tightly controlled by a two-layer regulatory circuit involving the host innate immune system on one hand and bacterial root commensals on another hand. We also report that fungi with the most detrimental activities in mono-association experiments with the host are part of the core root mycobiome in nature. Our results shed a light into how host–microbe and microbe–microbe interactions act in concert to prevent fungal dysbiosis in roots, thereby promoting plant health and maintaining growth-promoting activities of multikingdom microbial consortia.
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    The microbiome as part of the tumor ecosystem

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ravid Straussman and Lian Narunsky Haziza
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    The impact of metabolic processes at the brain’s choroid plexus and of the gut microbiome on Alzheimer’s disease manifestation

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    March
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00
    Title: Student Seminar - PhD Thesis Defense -ZOOM-
    Lecturer: Afroditi Tsitsou-Kampeli
    Organizer: Department of Brain Sciences
    Details: Zoom link https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98658552127?pwd=ZkZmWTBkd1AxZ0xPbGlpU3FPUW ... Read more Zoom link https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98658552127?pwd=ZkZmWTBkd1AxZ0xPbGlpU3FPUWpzUT09 Meeting ID:986 5855 2127 Password:495213
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    Abstract: The immune system and the gut microbiome are becoming major players in chronic n ... Read more The immune system and the gut microbiome are becoming major players in chronic neurodegenerative conditions. One of the key interfaces between the brain and the immune system with an impact on brain function is the choroid plexus (CP). The CP interface is central to the maintenance of brain homeostasis by exerting a plethora of different biological processes. However, in aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), interferon type-I (IFN-I) signaling accumulates at the CP and impedes part of its beneficial function by inducing a CP-pro-aging signature. My research contributed to the finding that IFN-I signaling at the CP induces an aging-like signature in microglia and impedes cognitive abilities in middle-aged mice in a microglia-dependent manner. In addition, I demonstrated that the brain-specific enzyme, cholesterol 24-hydroxylase (CYP46A1), is expressed by the CP epithelium and that its product, 24-hydroxycholesterol (24-OH), downregulates CP-pro-inflammatory signatures. Furthermore, in AD, CP CYP46A1 protein levels were decreased in both mice and humans and overexpression of Cyp46a1 at the CP in 5xFAD mice reversed brain inflammation, microglial dysfunction signatures, and cognitive loss. Finally, while the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α impaired CP Cyp46a1 expression in vitro, boosting systemic immunity in vivo increased its levels in an IFNGR2-dependent manner. These results highlight CYP46A1 at the CP as a remote regulator of brain inflammation, which diminishes with neurodegeneration, but is amenable to rescue. Focusing on the gut microbiome, I found that 5xFAD mice devoid of microbiome exhibited a striking decrease of long-term spatial memory deficit and increased synaptic and neuronal survival. Spatial memory deficit in 5xFAD mice kept in germ free (GF) or specific-pathogen free (SPF) conditions, negatively correlated with the abundance of 2-hydroxypyridine, while systemic, chronic supply of 2-hydroxypyridine in SPF 5xFAD mice improved spatial memory deficits in comparison to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-supplied 5xFAD mice. Overall, these findings demonstrate a microbiome-dependent effect on AD pathology in the 5xFAD mouse model and suggest a connection between 2-hydroxypyridine and AD manifestation. In general, this research thesis addresses novel aspects of choroid plexus and gut microbiome metabolism and their relation to AD progression. Zoom link https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98658552127?pwd=ZkZmWTBkd1AxZ0xPbGlpU3FPUWpzUT09 Meeting ID:986 5855 2127 Password:495213
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    Canceled ! - The microbiome as part of the tumor ecosystem

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    March
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ravid Straussman and Lian Narunsky Haziza
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Root exudation as functional trait involved in plant nutrition-use strategy classification and in shaping plant microbiota diversity and function

    Date:
    28
    Tuesday
    December
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Title: Zoom Guest Seminar
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/93885750016?pwd=blVnQ2phWDdlWTJ3UlVteVlYL1BkQT09 Meeting ID: 938 8575 0016 Password: 365291
    Lecturer: Prof. Feth el Zahar Haichar
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Dr. Tamir Klein
    Abstract: Plants adopt a variety of life history strategies to succeed in the Earth’s di ... Read more Plants adopt a variety of life history strategies to succeed in the Earth’s diverse environments. Using functional traits which are defined as “morphological, biochemical, physiological, or phonological” characteristics measurable at the individual level, plants are classified according to their species’ adaptative strategies, more than their taxonomy, from fast growing plant species to slower-growing conservative species. These different strategies probably influence the input and output of carbon (C)- resources, from the assimilation of carbon by photosynthesis to its release in the rhizosphere soil via root exudation. However, while root exudation was known to mediate plant-microbe interactions in the rhizosphere, it was not used as functional trait until recently. In addition, no study analyzed the impact of plant nutritional strategy via root exudation quality and quantity on rhizosphere microbial activities and diversity. Here, we (i) assess whether root exudate levels are useful plant functional traits in the classification of plant nutrient-use strategies and (ii) determine using stable isotope probing (SIP) approach the impact of root exudates quality and quantity on active microbiota diversity and activity. For this purpose, six grass species distributed along a gradient of plant nutrient resource strategies, from conservative species, characterized by low nitrogen (N) uptake, a long lifespans and low root exudation level, to exploitative species, characterized by high rates of photosynthesis, rapid rates of N uptake were used. We show, for the first time, that root exudation rate can be used as a key functional trait in plant ecology studies and plant strategy classification. In addition, measurement of microbial activities revealed an increase in denitrification and respiration activities for microbial communities colonizing the root adhering soil of exploitative species. This increase of microbial activities results probably from a higher exudation rate and more diverse metabolites by exploitative plant species. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that plant nutrient resource strategies have a role in shaping active microbiota. We present evidence demonstrating that plant nutrient use strategies shape active microbiota involved in root exudate assimilation and soil organic matter degradation via root exudation.
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    Determinant of microbiome plasticity - lessons from cows and fish

    Date:
    19
    Tuesday
    October
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Title: Guest seminar via zoom
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94733489940?pwd=Yk10a09vaEcvd2xidGkreElwb3d6QT09 Password: 026707
    Lecturer: Prof. Itzik Mizrahi
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Asaph Aharoni
    Abstract: Relationships between gut microbial ecosystems and their vertebrate hosts have b ... Read more Relationships between gut microbial ecosystems and their vertebrate hosts have been shown in recent years to play an essential role in the well-being and proper function of their hosts. In my lecture, I will discuss some of our recent findings regarding such ecosystems stability, development, and interaction with the host.
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    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00-17:30
    Title: "Dietary sulfur amino acids modulate kidney function and anti-tumor immunity via the gut microbiota"
    Lecturer: Dr. Lior Lobel
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Mee ... Read more https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Meeting ID: 964 6089 5671 Password: 599560
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