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Determinant of microbiome plasticity - lessons from cows and fish

Date:
19
Tuesday
October
2021
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:30-12:30
Title: Guest seminar via zoom
Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94733489940?pwd=Yk10a09vaEcvd2xidGkreElwb3d6QT09 Password: 026707
Lecturer: Prof. Itzik Mizrahi
Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
Details: Host: Prof. Asaph Aharoni
Abstract: Relationships between gut microbial ecosystems and their vertebrate hosts have b ... Read more Relationships between gut microbial ecosystems and their vertebrate hosts have been shown in recent years to play an essential role in the well-being and proper function of their hosts. In my lecture, I will discuss some of our recent findings regarding such ecosystems stability, development, and interaction with the host.
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    Past

    All Events

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00-17:30
    Title: "Dietary sulfur amino acids modulate kidney function and anti-tumor immunity via the gut microbiota"
    Lecturer: Dr. Lior Lobel
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Mee ... Read more https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Meeting ID: 964 6089 5671 Password: 599560
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    Guest Seminar via Zoom - Plant and Environmental Sciences Dept.

    Date:
    29
    Tuesday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Title: The Redwood Microbiome: Microbial community composition and functional consequences of plant-microbe interactions for the tallest species on Earth
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94034001636?pwd=WnRZRmFIejJ2QmllY2YvWERLZTFHUT09 Password 839042
    Lecturer: Dr. Claire Willing
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Dr. Stav Livne-Luzon at Dr. Tamir Klein's lab

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    05
    Wednesday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Title: “Mining the marine microbiome for remediation targets: lessons from the human microbiome”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. David Zeevi
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics,Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences

    Next Gen Immunology 2020

    Date:
    02
    Sunday
    February
    2020
    -
    05
    Wednesday
    February
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium
    Organizer: The M.D. Moross Institute for Cancer Research,Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology,The Nancy and Stephen Grand Center for Sensors and Security

    Personalised medicine based on microbiome and clinical data

    Date:
    12
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Eran Segal
    Organizer: Life Sciences

    Special Guest Seminar with Anat Zimmer

    Date:
    03
    Thursday
    October
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: "Analyzing PD3 clouds using PAReto Task Inference".
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Anat Zimmer
    Organizer: Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
    Abstract: It is a challenge to answer questions like: why some people develop a disease, r ... Read more It is a challenge to answer questions like: why some people develop a disease, react to a specific treatment and/or develop severe side-effects while others don’t. In order to explain these occurrences, one has to take a holistic approach and study the body physiology from a systems level perspective. Longitudinal multi-omics measurements together with genetics, on a large population, can serve such a purpose and help in predicting, reasoning, and preventing diseases. In partnership with Arivale Inc., we have developed infrastructure to collect longitudinal Personalized Dense Dynamic Data clouds (PD3 clouds) on thousands of individuals, which include genetics and longitudinal measurements of clinical labs, microbiome, metabolome, proteome, and self-reported data. The value of these extremely high-dimensional data clouds is clear; however, it also comprises a challenge in data analysis and interpretation. One way to reduce data dimensionality is called Pareto Task Inference (PARTI, Hart et al. 2015). We used this method to analyze the clinical labs and found that the data falls on a significant tetrahedron. The 4 vertices are archetypes that specialize in a certain task. Using all other datatypes, we identified enriched traits next to every archetype and revealed the underline tradeoffs that shape the data. This distinctive analysis uncovers unexpected relationships between datasets such as metabolomics, proteomics and clinical labs, and helps in interconnecting the different datatypes to characterize different states of human health.
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    Functions and multitrophic effects of plant secondary metabolites in cereals

    Date:
    21
    Tuesday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Matthias Erb
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Host: Dan Even If you wish to meet Prof. Erb, please contact Dan at dan.even@we ... Read more Host: Dan Even If you wish to meet Prof. Erb, please contact Dan at dan.even@weizmann.ac.il
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    Abstract: Small molecular weight organic compounds are common across the galaxy and transc ... Read more Small molecular weight organic compounds are common across the galaxy and transcend all known biological interactions. Plants, in particular, have evolved a remarkable capacity to produce diverse sets of so-called specialized metabolites from a few simple, inorganic precursors. Already in 1977, Rhoades argued that plant specialized metabolites are likely multifunctional, i.e. that they serve multiple purposes. Multifunctionality may render the production of specialized metabolites more cost effective and may explain their abundance and tight spatiotemporal control in plants. Work over the last decades confirms that specialized metabolites often have a broad range of functions, from growth and development to defense. However, our understanding of how this multifunctionality affects the interactions between plants and higher trophic levels, including herbivores and their natural enemies is limited. In my presentation, I will explore the importance of multifunctional plant metabolites in a multitrophic context by discussing our work on benzoxazinoids, the most abundant specialized metabolites in grasses such as wheat and maize. We find that benzoxazinoids act as direct defenses [1], within-plant defense signaling molecules [2], microbiome modulators [3] and siderophores [4]. At the same time, the western corn rootworm, a specialist maize pest and important agricultural pest, exploits benzoxazinoids as foraging cues [4], protective agents [5] and micronutrient providers [4]. Thus, the multifunctionality of plant specialized metabolites is mirrored in the adaptations of a specialist herbivore, resulting in a tightly interlocked metabolism. We are also starting to unravel how the metabolism of herbivore natural enemies such as entomopathogenic nematodes can be interlocked with the plant and the herbivore to enhance biological control. These findings have implications for our understanding of the ecology and evolution of plant specialized metabolites, and for their use in agricultural pest control.
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    The gut microbiome and metabolic disorders

    Date:
    05
    Sunday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Hagit Shapiro
    Organizer: Life Sciences

    Special Guest Seminar with Dr. Shai Carmi

    Date:
    16
    Wednesday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Shai Carmi
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Abstract: In this talk, I will review recent work by myself and others on Jewish populatio ... Read more In this talk, I will review recent work by myself and others on Jewish population and medical genetics, focusing on Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). I will describe the mixture events of AJ in Europe, the founder event they have experienced in the late Middle Ages, and their connections to ancient populations of the Levant. I will then describe large-scale genomic databases that we have recently generated for AJ, and the opportunities they open in medical genetics given the unique AJ demographic history. I will describe a few medical genetics projects including carrier screening, genome-wide association studies of microbiome composition and other traits, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis.
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