All upcoming events

Personalized Nanomedicines: Principles for using nanotechnology in cancer research

Date:
28
Sunday
January
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:00
Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
Lecturer: Prof. Avi Schroeder
Organizer: Department of Materials and Interfaces
Abstract: Medicine is taking its first steps towards patient-specific care. Nanoparticle ... Medicine is taking its first steps towards patient-specific care. Nanoparticles have many potential benefits for treating cancer, including the ability to transport complex molecular cargoes including siRNA and protein, as well as targeting to specific cell populations. The talk will address principles for engineering drug-loaded nanoparticles that can be remotely triggered to release their payload in disease sites. The evolution of such nanoparticles into programmed nano robots, unique particles that have an internal capacity to synthesize protein drugs, and their promise for treating cancer, will be discussed. Our research is aimed at tailoring treatments to address each person’s individualized needs and unique disease presentation. Specifically, we developed barcoded nanoparticles that target sites of cancer where they perform a programmed therapeutic task. These systems utilize molecular-machines to improve efficacy and reduce side effects.

When Lymphocytes

Date:
01
Thursday
February
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Eli Pikarsky
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Inflammation usually entails a diffuse influx of immune cells, scattered through ...Inflammation usually entails a diffuse influx of immune cells, scattered throughout the inflamed tissue. However, it can also form complex structures that histologically resemble lymphoid organs, referred to as ectopic lymphoid-like structures (ELSs). Using a mouse model forming hepatic ELSs we revealed that they can form protumorigenic immune niches, which foster growth of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progenitors. We are currently investigating the mechanisms that drive HCC formation in ELSs, as well as mechanisms that turn the ELS from an anti-tumor immune micro-organ into a protumorigenic one.

Coordinated regulation of gut microbiota and immune checkpoint by RNF5 ubiquitin ligase

Date:
15
Thursday
February
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Zeev Ronai
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Growing evidence points to the importance of gut microbiome in tumor response to ...Growing evidence points to the importance of gut microbiome in tumor response to therapy, including immune checkpoint therapy. Yet, fundamental questions regarding the regulation of the gut microbiota and possible cross talk with immune checkpoint activity remains largely unexplored. Our work on the E3 ubiquitin ligase, which has been implicated in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation, led us to identify an unexpected link between the ligase and tumor growth, through fine tuning of gut microbiota and immune checkpoint activity. The nature of such coordinated regulation and its implications for cancer development, response to therapy and autoimmune disorders will be discussed.

MICC cancer research workshop for clinical residents

Date:
21
Wednesday
February
2018
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22
Thursday
February
2018
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Organizer: The Moross Integrated Cancer Center (MICC)

Improving breast cancer recurrence prediction and understanding using expression profiles and machine learning

Date:
19
Monday
March
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Dr. Eitan Rubin
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

TBA

Date:
12
Thursday
April
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Eyal Gottlieb
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

TBA

Date:
10
Thursday
May
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Uri Alon
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Applications of Immunogenomics to Cancer

Date:
19
Tuesday
June
2018
Conference
Time: 08:00-14:00
Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium

All Events

The 3rd meeting of the Israeli Breast Cancer Translational Research Group

Date:
18
Thursday
January
2018
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
Organizer: Moross Research School of Mathematics and Computer Science

The 3rd meeting of the Israeli Breast Cancer Translational Research Group

Date:
18
Thursday
January
2018
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
Organizer: Faculty of Biochemistry

The 3rd meeting of the Israeli Breast Cancer Translational Research Group

Date:
18
Thursday
January
2018
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
Organizer: Faculty of Biology

The barcode of life – using 600 species to improve cancer diagnostics and drug development

Date:
15
Monday
January
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Dr. Yuval Tabach
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

The molecular mechanisms regulating CLL survival

Date:
11
Thursday
January
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Idit Shachar
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in the Western wo ...Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in the Western world. The disease is characterized by decreased apoptosis and accumulation of mature B lymphocytes. We have previously shown that CD74 induces a downstream cascade that regulates CLL survival. Recently, we showed that CD74-intracellular domain interacts with the transcription factors RUNX and NF-B and binds to proximal and distal regulatory sites enriched for genes involved in apoptosis, immune response and cell migration. One of CD74 target genes is CD84. Our results demonstrate that CD84 mediates the interaction of CLL cells with their microenvironment inducing cell survival. In addition, activation of CD84 elevates PD-L1 expression on CLL cells and their microenvironment which interact with PD-1 expressed on T cells. Our results suggest CD84 blockade as a novel therapeutic strategy to reverse tumor-induced immune suppression.

Single cell analysis of rare events in cancer

Date:
09
Tuesday
January
2018
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Arjun Raj
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

Cancer Immunotherapy: successes and challenges

Date:
03
Wednesday
January
2018
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
Organizer: The Moross Integrated Cancer Center (MICC)

Genomic approaches to studying cancer aneuploidy

Date:
28
Thursday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:15
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Dr. Uri Ben-David
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

New Findings in Folate Homeostasis and Their Implications in Cancer Therapy

Date:
26
Tuesday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
Lecturer: Dr. Naama Kanarek
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences

Cell-free circulating tumour DNA as a non-invasive tool for cancer diagnostics and research

Date:
25
Monday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Nitzan Rosenfeld
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Cancer is driven by genomic alterations, and can evolve in response to selective ...Cancer is driven by genomic alterations, and can evolve in response to selective pressures. Sampling of tumour material however is a limiting factor for both diagnostics and research. Blood plasma contains cell-free fragments of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) that can be collected non-invasively. With advanced genomic techniques this becomes an effective source of information. “Liquid biopsy” assays are now entering clinical use for non-invasive molecular profiling of advanced cancers to guide targeted therapy. Serially-collection plasma samples can be used to track response to treatment, cancer progression and emergence of known or new resistance mechanisms. Methods that can detect minute amounts of ctDNA are being used to study early-stage cancer and for detection of minimal residual disease after initial definitive treatment.

Departmental Seminar

Date:
24
Sunday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 13:00-14:00
Title: Discovering a cancer-associated mutation in autophagy and deciphering its functional implication
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Gal Nuta
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

Frontiers in Systems Biology

Date:
19
Tuesday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Title: Modulating Translation
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Mihaela Zavolan
Organizer: The Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
Abstract: In yeast, the knock out of individual ribosomal protein (RP) genes ...In yeast, the knock out of individual ribosomal protein (RP) genes leads to a wide range of life span phenotypes, some mutants having significantly increased, other significantly decreased life span. In this talk I would like to present our efforts in characterizing the regulation of mRNA translation in relation to cellular states, from yeast to man. I will describe our work on inferring determinants of protein synthesis rates in yeast, where we found that the Gcn4 transcription factor, which is induced in many conditions that enhance yeast lifespan (RP gene knockout, calorie restriction, mTOR inhibition) not only activates transcription of amino acid biosynthesis genes, but also represses protein biosynthesis. How much variation in RP expression is expected in human tissues has been largely unknown, but RP gene mutations have been described in association with hematological disorders. Through a comprehensive analysis of human RP mRNAs expression pattern across 28 tissues, over 300 primary cells and 16 tumor types, we identified many RPs which exhibit tissue-specific expression. In the hematopoietic system, a small number of RP genes, possible regulated by transcription factors with tissue-specific expression, unequivocally discriminate cells of distinct lineages and developmental stages. Different cancer types also show dysregulated expression of individual RPs, some RPs having a relative increase and other decrease in expression. Finally, I will discuss our efforts in mapping sites of snoRNA-guided RNA modifications.

A Tale of Two Evils: Aging and Cancer

Date:
06
Wednesday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Professor Curtis C. Harris, MD
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

G-INCPM Special Seminar - Dr. Tamar Paz-Elizur, Dept. of Biomolecular Sciences, Weizmann - "Translating DNA repair for the battle against lung cancer"

Date:
04
Monday
December
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:15
Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
Lecturer: Dr. Tamar Paz
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: DNA repair is a key mechanism for eliminating DNA damage and preventing mutation ...DNA repair is a key mechanism for eliminating DNA damage and preventing mutations, and is therefore a major natural defense mechanism against cancer. With the goal of exploring the role of DNA repair in sporadic cancer we have developed a panel of functional DNA repair assays, highly reproducible and robust, that enable us to measure the activity of specific DNA repair enzymes directed towards oxidative lesions. In my talk, I will describe the results of two epidemiological/clinical blinded case-control studies, conducted in Israel and in the UK, showing that lung cancer patients have imbalanced DNA repair capacity compare to healthy people. The potential use of these DNA repair biomarkers in lung cancer prevention, early detection & therapy will be discussed.

Integrating genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of MAP kinase pathway targeted therapy resistance toward rational combination therapies

Date:
30
Thursday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Keith T. Flaherty
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Efforts to describe mechanisms of de novo and adaptive resistance to BRAF and ME ...Efforts to describe mechanisms of de novo and adaptive resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibitors in melanoma have provided evidence of a convergent resistance phenotype defined by neural crest markers. Cells with this phenotype have been described as slowly cycling and invasive in comparison to isogenic cells with expressing melanocyte differentiation markers. Additionally, these neural crest-like cells utilize receptor tyrosine signaling to drive survival pathways and oxidative phosphorylation as their primary metabolic feature. These insights have provided new leads for therapeutic intervention to target these resistant cells. In parallel work, tumors that are not responsive to immune checkpoint antibodies have been found to have many of the same features: most notably loss of melanocyte lineage antigens and expression of neural crest markers. These data suggest that similar next-generation therapeutic strategies aimed at overcoming therapeutic resistance may be useful in combination with both MAPK pathway and immune checkpoint inhibitors.

Identification of Druggable and Redox vulnerabilities in a genetically defined cancer

Date:
26
Sunday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Dr. Liron Bar-Peled
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
Details: Joint Seminar: Molecular Genetics and Biological Regulation

Bridging between personalized medicine and T-cell based immunotherapy

Date:
20
Monday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Cyrille Cohen
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Studying membrane proteins and drug responses in individual breast cancer cells

Date:
16
Thursday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Niels de Jonge
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

G-INCPM Special Seminar - Prof. Amnon Peled, CEO-CSO, Biokine Therapeutics Ltd., Ness-Ziona - "Development of HTS for Novel Chemokine Antagonists"

Date:
15
Wednesday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:30
Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
Lecturer: Prof. Amnon Peled
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: Chemokines and their receptors play critical roles in the progression of autoimm ...Chemokines and their receptors play critical roles in the progression of autoimmunity and inflammation and cancer. Typically, multiple chemokines are involved in the development of these pathologies. Indeed, targeting single chemokines or chemokine receptors has failed to achieve significant clinical benefits in treating autoimmunity and inflammation. In our work, promiscuous chemokine binding peptides that could bind and inhibit multiple inflammatory chemokines, such as CCL20, CCL2, CCL5, and CXCL9/10/11, were selected from phage display libraries. These peptides were cloned into human mutated immunoglobulin Fc-protein fusions (peptibodies). These peptibodies showed a significant inhibition of disease progression in a variety of animal models for autoimmunity, inflammation and cancer. Based on our peptibodies we develop HTP screening system which allow us the identification of novel anti chemokines small molecules.

Epigenetic strategies to overcome chemoresistance and to radiosensitize cancers

Date:
13
Monday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Elizabeth Martinez
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Fighting Fire with Fire: Novel Redox Active Anti-Cancers Agents that Target NDRG1 and P-glycoprotein

Date:
01
Wednesday
November
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 13:15-14:15
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Professor Des R. Richardson
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

The clinical implications of leukemia evolution

Date:
30
Monday
October
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Dr. Liran Shlush
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating disease with less than 10% of elde ...Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating disease with less than 10% of elderly patients survive five years. While AML originates from stem cells which evolve over many years it presents acutely due to the expansion of more committed progenitors. Over the recent years we were able to identify the origins of AML relapse, and also to study AML years before it is diagnosed. We now can predict AML 6 years before diagnosis. Future studies will soon provide evidence whether early treatment will be beneficial.

IMM Guest Seminar: Prof. Smita Krishnaswamy, from Yale school of Medicine, will lecture on "Manifold-Learning Frameworks for Extracting Structure from High-throughput Single-Cell Datasets", Monday Oct 23rd, 2017

Date:
23
Monday
October
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Smita Krishnaswamy
Organizer: Department of Immunology
Abstract: Recent advances in single-cell technologies enable deep insights into cellular d ...Recent advances in single-cell technologies enable deep insights into cellular development, gene regulation, and phenotypic diversity by measuring gene expression and epigenetics for thousands of single cells in a single experiment. While these technologies hold great potential for improving our understanding of cellular states and progression, they also pose new challenges in terms of scale, complexity, noise and measurement artifact which require advanced mathematical and algorithmic tools to extract underlying biological signals. In this talk, I cover one of most promising techniques to tackle these problems: manifold learning, and the related manifold assumption in data analysis. Manifold learning provides a powerful structure for algorithmic approaches to naturally process and the data, visualize the data and understand progressions as well as to find phenotypic diversity as well and infer patterns in it. I will cover two alternative approaches to manifold learning, diffusion-based and deep learning-based and show results in several projects including:1) MAGIC (Markov Affinity-based Graph Imputation of Cells): an algorithm for denoising and transcript recover of single cells applied to single-cell RNA sequencing data from the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer, 2) PHATE (Potential of Heat-diffusion Affinity-based Transition Embedding): a visualization technique that offers an alternative to tSNE in that it emphasizes progressions and branching structures rather than cluster separations shown on several datasets including a newly generated embryoid body differentiation dataset, and 3) SAUCIE (Sparse AutoEncoders for Clustering Imputation and Embedding): a novel auto encoder architecture that performs denoising, batch normalization, clustering and visualization simultaneously for massive single-cell data sets from multi-patient cohorts shown on mass cytometry data from Dengue patients.

Monitoring treatment response by imaging oncogenic rewiring and immune microenvironment changes, through combining whole body imaging with tissue / exosome-based approaches

Date:
18
Wednesday
October
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Tony Ng
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Identification of Potent Fli-1 Inhibitors from Chinese Medicinal Plants for treatment of Leukemia

Date:
15
Sunday
October
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Dr. Yaacov Ben-David
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Details: This seminar's date has changed and was postponed to October 15. Rina

G-INCPM Special Seminar - Prof. Izhak Haviv, Cancer Personalized Medicine & Genomic Diagnostics Lab, Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, Zfat, Bar-Ilan University - "Evidence-based, personalized, or immuno-medicine – where’s the perfect healthcare"

Date:
15
Sunday
October
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:30
Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
Lecturer: Prof. Izhak Haviv
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: The etiological bases of cancer are a large number of ‘bugs’, mutations in t ...The etiological bases of cancer are a large number of ‘bugs’, mutations in the human genome, mostly accumulating in somatic cells during patient’s lifespan. It took more than a century to translate this etiological insight into new ways to smart-bomb the cancer away. As new treatment options emerge, healthcare guidelines seek ways, such companion testing, to identify the patient, the treatment is most likely to benefit. The dynamic nature of the field of medical discoveries poses a challenge to the clinical decision making process, and guidelines have therefore gone through a series of paradigm shifts, all based on risk-benefit assessments. First, in the evidence-based paradigm, optional treatments are ranked according to the fraction of patients the treatment is likely to benefit, starting from the most commonly useful treatment and down the fractional benefit rank. Then, personalized medicine approach utilizes clinical and genomic sequence and molecular analyses, to rearrange the treatments rank, and recommend each patient with their own best treatment. In the most recent paradigm, immune-oncology, we profile the direct adaptive immune reaction, T-cell receptor sequence, to cancer-borne somatic mutations. The unique sequence of the respective T-cell receptors had been demonstrated to genetically code for the recognition and elimination of cells, carrying and presenting the mutant sequence. In other words, the cure to each patient is hidden in their own body, and once discovered, has the potential to harness the progression of cancer, as is being done for patients with high mutation load and immunological checkpoint inhibitors. While this approach is more bioinformatically and experimentally intensive, the results obtained from this approach are far superior, both in the end-stage patients it succeeds to benefit, as well as the duration of remission. Using double-autologous patient-derived xenografts, that model both the cancer tissue, as well as the immune system of each patient, we are harnessing these technologies to improve and accelerate the implementation of those new paradigms in the clinical practice.

:Personalized Approaches in Radiation Oncology

Date:
18
Monday
September
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Michael Bauman
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Radiotherapy is a highly personalized treatment, where dose distribution is tail ...Radiotherapy is a highly personalized treatment, where dose distribution is tailored to the patient based on anatomical and clinical information. Advances in particle therapy, image guidance and treatment adaptation will broaden the scope and precision of radiotherapy, while novel prognostic and predictive biomarkers will act as a basis for further individualized treatment. Additionally, a sound understanding of biological radioresistance mechanisms will be essential, for example, to combat relapse after therapy. Future developments in personalized and high precision medicine will depend on comprehensive research networks to collect reliable data from large and homogeneous patient collectives.

MICC - TICC Symposium - Emerging Trends in Cancer Recearch

Date:
17
Sunday
September
2017
Conference
Time: 08:00-17:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

Does senescence/polyploidazation lead to cancer cell regrowth?

Date:
13
Wednesday
September
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Professor Ewa Sikora
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

Mitochondria at the interface between homeostasis and apoptosis

Date:
04
Monday
September
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Atan Gross
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that play fundamental roles in pivota ...Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that play fundamental roles in pivotal cellular processes including energy production, metabolism, and apoptosis. Our scientific interests evolve around topics related to how these different mitochondrial processes are coordinated to regulate cellular stress responses and cellular fate. Over the years, we discovered a new pathway composed of the nuclear ATM kinase, pro-apoptotic BID, and mitochondrial MTCH2, connecting mitochondria metabolism to stress signals originating from the cell surface and nucleus. More recently, we revealed that MTCH2 is involved in regulating mitochondrial dynamics/fusion, providing a clue to the mechanism by which the pathway regulates mitochondrial function.

Genome wide identification of genes mediating cancer resistance

Date:
15
Tuesday
August
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof.Eytan Ruppin
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Most patients with advanced cancer eventually acquire resistance to targeted the ...Most patients with advanced cancer eventually acquire resistance to targeted therapies, spurring extensive efforts to identify molecular events mediating therapy resistance. Many of these events involve synthetic rescue (SR) interactions, where the reduction in cancer cell viability caused by targeted gene inactivation is rescued by the adaptive alteration of another gene (the rescuer). Here we perform a genome-wide identification of SR-mediated resistance determinants by analyzing the tumor transcriptomics and survival data of 10,000 cancer patients. Predicted SR interactions are validated versus publicly available resistance data and new experimental screens that we have conducted. We show that the SR interactions successfully predict cancer patients’ response and emerging resistance and that the targeting of predicted rescuer genes re-sensitizes resistant cancer cells. These results provide novel rationale-based combinatorial approaches for proactively overcoming therapy resistance. Finally, going beyond targeted therapy, we show that the SR analysis can successfully predict molecular alterations conferring resistance to immunotherapy in melanoma patients. [Work led by Avinash Das and Joo Sang Lee in my lab, in collaboration with the labs of Silvio Gutkind (UCSD), Cyril Benes (MGH), Keith Flaherty & Genevieve Boland (MGH) and Meenhard Herlyn (Wistar).]

Personalized Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer

Date:
08
Tuesday
August
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Roy S. Herbst
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Despite advances in the treatment of cancer, with novel molecularly targeted the ...Despite advances in the treatment of cancer, with novel molecularly targeted therapies and drug combinations, lung cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. For this reason, significant efforts have been made to examine the interaction between cancer and the immune system. This has led to the discovery of the programmed death 1 (PD1) and ligand (PDL1) pathway, which was found to play a key role in immune evasion by cancer cells and the formation of a tumor microenvironment. Blockade of this pathway enables the ability of the innate immune system to activate their anticancer responses and to reverse the tumor microenvironment. Newly approved drugs, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, have mechanisms of action that inhibit PD1, while others like atezolizumab, block PDL1. Although, responses with these drugs have shown significant activity in some patients, only 20-30% of patients respond overall. In this talk, mechanistic studies to identify predictive markers of response will be discussed along with markers of resistance (both primary and acquired). In addition, novel combinations of immunotherapy with chemotherapy, targeted therapy and even chemotherapy will be explored.

Targetting Growth Factor Signalling to Reduce the Impact of Colon Cancer

Date:
02
Wednesday
August
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Anthony Burgess
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Targeting the mitochondria as a novel therapeutic strategies for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Date:
31
Monday
July
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Aaron Shimmer
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Our understanding of the molecular mutations associated with acute myeloid leuke ...Our understanding of the molecular mutations associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has improved, but most of these mutations are not directly “drugable”. Thus, new therapeutic approaches for AML may need to target pathways and biological vulnerabilities downstream of these genetic mutations. We recently demonstrated that AML cells and stem cells have dysregulated mitochondrial characteristics and an increased reliance on oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial metabolism. I will discuss our findings related to mitochondrial biology in AML and therapeutic strategies that target these pathways. I will also describe our new findings linking new mitochondrial metabolism with differentiation of AML cells and stem cells.

“Gadd45 Diverse Stress Response Functions in Cancer, Autophagy, Sepsis & Senescence”

Date:
30
Sunday
July
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 15:00-16:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Professor Dan A. Liebermann
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

New Horizons in Immune Dynamics

Date:
18
Tuesday
July
2017
Conference
Time: 08:00-18:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

"The Reactive Oxygen Driven Tumor: An Update"

Date:
05
Wednesday
July
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Jack L. Arbiser, M.D., Ph.D
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

A novel driver, biomarker and target for tumor progression and metastasis: The MACC1 story

Date:
28
Wednesday
June
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Ulrike Stein
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Alternative splicing: from epigenetics and chromatin to cancer

Date:
12
Monday
June
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Gil Ast
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Details: Department of Human Molecular Genetics & Biochemistry, Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University
Abstract: Alternative splicing (AS) is a mechanism that increases transcriptomic and prote ...Alternative splicing (AS) is a mechanism that increases transcriptomic and proteomic diversity by allowing the generation of multiple mRNA products from a single gene. A strong connection was established between AS and carcinogenesis. We recently developed a method that integrates all known physical interaction (protein-DNA, protein-RNA, protein-protein), gene expression and AS data to construct the largest map of transcriptomic and proteomic interactions leading to cancerous splicing aberrations defined to date and identify driver pathways therein. The method was already applied to colon adenocarcinoma and non-small-cell lung carcinoma. I will also talk about the link between chromatin organization and epigenetics markers and how they are related to the appearance of warm-blooded organisms and exon selection.

Combination therapies and drug resistance in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Date:
29
Monday
May
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Sima Lev
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive, heterogeneous disea ...Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive, heterogeneous disease with high rates of metastasis and poor prognosis. Currently, there are no targeted therapies for TNBC and adjuvant chemotherapy is the mainstay treatment. Identification of molecular targets and potent combination therapies for TNBC is a major challenge of extensive biomedical research and our own studies. Given that drug resistance is a critical clinical problem, a drug combination that could overcome drug resistance could offer a promising therapeutic opportunity. We have recently identified potent combination therapies for TNBC which are not only potent but could also overcome drug resistance and further defined the molecular mechanisms underlying their therapeutic benefit.

Oncogenesis: WIS-McGill Cancer Symposium

Date:
24
Wednesday
May
2017
Conference
Time: 08:00-13:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
Organizer: The M.D. Moross Institute for Cancer Research

Novel role of autophagy in the regulation of the TNFR family member, Fn14

Date:
16
Tuesday
May
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-10:30
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Dr. Hila Winer
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: The fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) belongs to the TNF receptor sup ...The fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) belongs to the TNF receptor superfamily. Fn14 is a unique receptor being highly inducible, mainly in response to tissue injury and solid tumor formation. The only ligand it is known to bind is the TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), which activates the NF-kB signaling pathway. Fn14 is constitutively synthesized and cycle between the Golgi and the plasma membrane, internalized and dispatched for lysosomal degradation independently on ligand binding. In the present study we tested the relationship between autophagy, a major stress-activated cellular pathway, and Fn14 subcellular localization. Our data shows that deletion of several key autophagic factors leads to an increase in Fn14 levels. Importantly, we found that members of the mammalian ATG8s protein family regulate different stages of Fn14 trafficking: GABARAP or LC3C regulate Fn14 autophagic turnover while GATE-16 or LC3B regulate Fn14 trafficking within the endolysosomal system. Taken together our results provide a new link between the autophagic machinery and the trafficking and function of a TNF receptor family member.

Frontiers in statistical physics and cancer genomics

Date:
16
Tuesday
May
2017
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Contact: http://

Cancer and Genome Mini-Symposium

Date:
15
Monday
May
2017
Conference
Time: 09:00-12:30
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Organizer: The Moross Integrated Cancer Center (MICC)

Mini-Symposium on Cancer & Genome

Date:
15
Monday
May
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 09:00-17:00
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Giovanni Blandino, Stefan Wiemann, Gad Getz
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Giovanni Blandino, Regina Elena National Intstitute for Cancer Treatment and Res ...Giovanni Blandino, Regina Elena National Intstitute for Cancer Treatment and Research, Rome, Italy "Mutant p53 protein: an oncogenic regulator of coding and non-coding RNA network in human cancers" Stefan Wiemann, Division Molecular Genome Analysis, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany “Signaling and communication in Cancer” Gad Getz, Director, Cancer Genome Computational Analysis, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge MA, USA TBA

Sergio Lombroso Award in Cancer Research ceremony and symposium Personalized Cancer Treatment-Promises and Challenges

Date:
14
Sunday
May
2017
Conference
Time: 09:00-13:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

Proteasome plasticity and cancer

Date:
08
Monday
May
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Yosef Shaul
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Details: N O T E - CHANGE OF DATE TO MAY 8th
Abstract: Proteasomes are large intracellular complexes degrading proteins. The major comp ...Proteasomes are large intracellular complexes degrading proteins. The major complex is the 26S particle that is formed by association of the 20S catalytic particle with one or two 19S regulatory complex (RC). We show that high levels of 26S proteasome diagnoses cancer cells and Ras transformed cell lines. The increase in the 26S level is uncoupled from rate of cells proliferation. Remarkably shRNA designed to reduce the 19S RC levels proved eἀective in killing the tumor but not the normal cells. The more the tumor cell lines are aggressive the better are killed. We propose to target the 19S RC as a therapeutic strategy of the aggressive tumors.

The Yin and Yang of JAK-STAT signaling in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Date:
04
Thursday
May
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 09:30-10:15
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Shai Izraeli, MD
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

System level study of the cell death signature in melanoma: a vision towards precision cancer therapy

Date:
30
Sunday
April
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 13:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Naama Dekel
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

PTPROt in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a tumor suppressor or promotor?

Date:
23
Sunday
April
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 13:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Jean Wakim
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

Metabolic regulation of normal and leukaemia stem cells: the role of reactive oxygen species, mitochondria transfer and nitric oxide

Date:
06
Monday
March
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Tsvee Lapidot
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Bone marrow (BM) retained blood forming stem cells are protected from DNA damagi ...Bone marrow (BM) retained blood forming stem cells are protected from DNA damaging agents including chemotherapy to prevent lethal infections and hematology failure. Stem cell chemotherapy resistance, requires dynamic interactions with BM stromal and endothelial cells and involves metabolic regulation of ROS, mitochondria transfer, and inhibition of NO. Leukemic stem cells initiate and maintain the disease and are the major target for clinical chemotherapy treatment. These malignant stem cells also reside in the BM and their chemotherapy resistance can lead to lethal leukemia relapse. Metabolic regulation of normal and leukemic stem cells in the bone marrow will be discussed.

G-INCPM-Special Seminar - Prof. Paul Brennan, Associate Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, Principal Investigator, SGC & Target Discovery Institute, Head of Chemistry, Alzheimer's Research UK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute

Date:
08
Wednesday
February
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:15
Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
Lecturer: Prof. Paul Brennan
Organizer: Faculty of Biochemistry
Abstract: Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in phenotype that are not encoded ...Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in phenotype that are not encoded in an organism’s DNA. Epigenetic effects due to persistent changes in gene transcription have been linked to chemical modification of DNA and the proteins that package and regulate DNA in the nucleus, histones. One of the major post-translational modifications of histones is acetylation of lysine residues prevalent in histone tails. The principal readers of histone acetyl lysine marks are bromodomains (BRDs), which are a diverse family of over sixty evolutionary conserved protein-interaction modules. Proteins that contain BRDs have been implicated in the development of a large variety of diseases, including cancer and inflammation. In order to decipher the complex biology of bromodomains and provide evidence linking specific bromodomain targets to disease, we are discovering selective, cell active small molecule inhibitors of bromodomains.

Personalized Cancer Nano-Medicines

Date:
06
Monday
February
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Avi Schroeder
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: The field of medicine is taking its first steps towards patient-specific care. O ...The field of medicine is taking its first steps towards patient-specific care. Our research is aimed at tailoring treatments to address each person’s individualized needs and unique disease presentation. Specifically, we are developing nanoparticles that target disease sites, where they perform a programmed therapeutic task. These systems utilize molecular-machines and cellular recognition to improve efficacy and reduce side effects. Nanoparticles have many potential benefits for treating cancer, including the ability to transport complex molecular cargoes, as well as targeting to specific cell populations. The talk will describe principles for developing lipid nanoparticles that can be remotely triggered to release their payload in disease sites. Two examples will be described: the first involves a nanoscale theranostic system for predicting the therapeutic potency of cancer medications. The system provides patient-specific drug activity data with single-cell resolution. The system makes use of barcoded nanoparticles to predict the therapeutic effect different drugs will have on the tumor microenvironment. The second system makes use of enzymes, loaded into a biodegradable chip, to perform a programed therapeutic task – surgery with molecular precision. Collagenase is an enzyme that cleaves collagen, but not other tissues. This enzyme was loaded into the biodegradable chip and placed in the periodontal pocket. Once the collagenase releases from the chip, collagen fibers that connect between the teeth and the underlying bone are relaxed, thereby enabling enhanced orthodontic corrective motion and reducing pain. This new field is termed BioSurgery. The clinical implications of these approaches will be discussed.

(β)Arrestin Prostate Cancer Progression

Date:
01
Wednesday
February
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Yehia Daaka
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

CKIalpha as a therapeutic target in hematological malignancies

Date:
30
Monday
January
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: CANCER RESEARCH CLUB
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Yinon Ben-Neriah
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Human leukemia is distinguished by a relatively low rate of p53 mutation, possib ...Human leukemia is distinguished by a relatively low rate of p53 mutation, possibly enabling pharmacological activation of WT p53 for therapy. CKI ablation offers robust means of p53 activation, which has successfully been tested in leukemia cells in vitro and underlies the therapeutic effect of lenalidomide in human MDS pre-leukemia syndrome. However, with no selective CKI inhibitors available for in vivo use, the therapeutic value of CKI inhibition in hematological malignancies cannot be validated. I will describe the development of such inhibitors and show that they are highly efficient in controlling leukemia in mouse models, while sparing normal hematopoiesis.

Tailored Therapy in in Lung Cancer: early diagnosis, targeted & immune therapy

Date:
23
Monday
January
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Title: Special Guest Seminar
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Nir Peled
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Clinical and biological implications of replication repair deficiency in cancer: from cancer predisposition to novel therapies

Date:
19
Thursday
January
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Dr. Uri Tabori
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: We recently discovered a unique group of cancers with by far the highest mutatio ...We recently discovered a unique group of cancers with by far the highest mutational load ever described. These “ultrahypermutant” cancers arise in the setting of biallelic germline mutations in mismatch repair genes and somatic mutations in DNA polymerase. Together, complete replication repair deficiency constitute a unique paradigm of cancer development and progression. These ultrahypermutant cancers can be used to study several key concepts in cancer including identifying drivers and passenger mutations in cancer development and early vs late cancer processes. Importantly, ultrhypermutation can be used as “Achilles’ heel” to uncover susceptibility and novel therapies to patients with replication repair deficient cancers.

German-Israeli Helmholtz Research School in Cancer Biology

Date:
16
Monday
January
2017
-
17
Tuesday
January
2017
Conference
Time: 08:00 - 17:30
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

Heterogeneity landscapes of breast cancer- communities of clones and communities of cells

Date:
09
Monday
January
2017
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Carlos Caldas
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: We redefined the molecular taxonomy of breast cancer identifying the genomic dri ...We redefined the molecular taxonomy of breast cancer identifying the genomic driver-based subtypes. We have recently shown these subtypes have prototypical clonal and TME architectures. These observations have profound biological and clinical implications which we are now exploring. These include insights into clonal evolution and cancer-immune system interactions.

The airway transcriptome as a biomarker for lung cancer detection and prevention

Date:
07
Wednesday
December
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:00-13:00
Location: Camelia Botnar Building
Lecturer: Prof. Avrum Spira
Organizer: Life Sciences

Regulation of RNA structure and function by small organic molecules

Date:
04
Sunday
December
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Kazuhiko Nakatani
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: We have studied small molecules binding to and regulating RNA structure and, eve ...We have studied small molecules binding to and regulating RNA structure and, eventually its function. In the talk, recent our results on the effect of maturation of microRNA by small molecule binding to its precursor pre-microRNA to modulate the Dicer cleavage reaction, and induce the programmed –1 ribosomal frame shift by ligand-induced pseudo knot on mRNA

Immunogenic Sugar Antigens in Cancer and Heart Disease

Date:
01
Thursday
December
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Vered padler-Karavani
Organizer: Department of Immunology

microRNAs, “replacement therapy” and cancer – how far have we come?

Date:
01
Thursday
December
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: CANCER RESEARCH CLUB
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Professor Peter Leedman PhD, FRACP
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Methylation patterns in cancer: the unrecognized role of transcriptional enhancers

Date:
28
Monday
November
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Title: CANCER RESEARCH CLUB
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Prof. Asaf Hellman
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Studies over the last decade have identified differences in cancer gene expressi ...Studies over the last decade have identified differences in cancer gene expression that cannot be explained by coding sequences or promoter variations. The effect of transcriptional enhancers, on the other hand, remains unclear due to the lack of an effective way to link enhancers with their controlled genes. Recently, we discovered a class of inter-tumor, inter-patient DNA methylation variations in putative enhancers that predict changes in gene expression levels with much greater power than promoter or sequence analyses. I will describe our efforts to determine if changes in enhancer methylation form part of the genomic basis of cancer.

'Breast cancer explants as a pharmacogenomics platform'

Date:
23
Wednesday
November
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Carlos Caldas
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

C/EBPβ LIP augments cell death by inducing a novel tumor suppressor gene osteoglycin

Date:
20
Sunday
November
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 13:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Rina Wassermann-Dozorets
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

In vivo veritas – Using CRISPR genome editing to model cancer in mice

Date:
17
Thursday
November
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00
Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
Lecturer: Prof. Daniel Schramek
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
Abstract: Modern Genetics is revealing virtually all the genetic and epigenetic alteration ...Modern Genetics is revealing virtually all the genetic and epigenetic alterations associated with human malignancies. Mining this information for Precision Medicine is predicated on weeding out ‘bystander’ mutation and identifying the ‘driver’ mutations responsible for tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, as only the latter have diagnostic and therapeutic value. Secondly, we have to elucidate how driver mutations alter the fundamental molecular pathways governing tissue growth and identify actionable nodes within a given cancer gene network that can be exploited therapeutically. The massive quantity of data emerging from cancer genomics therefore demands a corresponding increase in the efficiency and throughput of in vivo models to comprehensively assess all putative cancer genes. We therefore developed a versatile functional genomics toolbox that enables us to generate and analyze thousands of somatic gene knock-out or overexpression clones within a single animal in a matter of weeks. Ultrasound-guided in utero injections allow us to selectively transduce fluorescently-labeled lentiviral CRISPR or ORF libraries into various organs of living mouse embryos. Subsequent mosaic analysis, next-generation sequencing and library barcode deconvolution enables us to identify genes that regulate proliferation, differentiation and survival. Of note, this analysis not only assess the gene function in an physiological and immune-competent microenvironment, but can also be combined with any mouse model and treatment schedule to faithfully model human malignancies. Using this technique, we have completed several proof-of-concept screens and elucidated several novel tumor suppressor genes in Head&Neck. Currently, we are performing several multiplexed in vivo CRISPR screens to uncover context-specific cancer vulnerabilities, novel immune regulators and genes that confer resistance to chemo- or targeted therapies. In this seminar, I will highlight the utility of direct in vivo screening to integrate human cancer genomics and mouse modeling for rapid and systematic discovery of cancer driver mutations and novel cancer vulnerabilities.

MCB - Students Seminar

Date:
15
Tuesday
November
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:15
Title: Ex Vivo organ culture for the study of drug response in human cancer tissue, The mammalian apicome - asymmetric RNA localization in the intestinal epithelium
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Nancy Gevert & Andreas Moor
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

Bi directional communication of melanoma with the micro environment

Date:
14
Monday
November
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Dr. Carmit Levy
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: Melanoma originates in the epidermis and becomes metastatic after invasion into ...Melanoma originates in the epidermis and becomes metastatic after invasion into the dermis. This radial to vertical growth transition, is crucial for melanoma metastatic stage, yet the triggers of this transition remain elusive. We demonstrated that the microenvironment drives melanoma metastasis independently of mutation acquisition. By examining changes in microenvironment that occur during melanoma radial growth, we found that direct contact of melanoma cells with the remote epidermal layer triggers vertical invasion via Notch signaling activation. Moreover, we show that melanoma cells directly affect the formation of the dermal tumor niche by microRNA trafficking before invasion.

"Understanding drug resistance to targeted therapy in cancer: a computer-based approach”

Date:
01
Tuesday
November
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
Lecturer: Dr. Ran Friedman
Organizer: Department of Structural Biology

HARNESSING THE INNATE IMMUNE SYSTEM FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY

Date:
31
Monday
October
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Dr. NIr Ben Chetrit
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

G-INCPM - Special Seminar - Prof. Mag. Dr. Andreas J. Kungl, Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Karl-Franzens Univ. of Graz, Austria

Date:
19
Monday
September
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:30
Title: "Therapeutically targeting glycosaminoglycans by chemokine decoys: evidence from in vitro, in vivo and phase 1 clinical data"
Location: Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Lecturer: Prof. Mag. Dr. Andreas J. Kungl
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear, highly charged/sulfated polysaccharides wh ...Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear, highly charged/sulfated polysaccharides which were shown by us and others, applying pull-down proteomics, to be involved in binding and structurally activating a multitude of proteins. Specifically endothelial GAGs such as heparan sulphate (HS) play an important role in chemokine presentation to chemokine GPC receptors on leukocytes and transportation across the endothelial barrier. As such, the chemokine-GAG interaction interface is involved in a plethora of diseases like acute/chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis. We have engineered several chemokines with respect to their GAG binding and GPC receptor activity so that they become dominant-negative decoys thereby antagonising the biological activity of their wild type counterparts with excellent dose-response profiles in vitro and in vivo. Recent data from CXCL8, CXCL12, and CCL2 chemokine mutants in inflammatory and oncology models will be presented.

Dopamine receptors in breast cancer: Overexpression, signaling and Therapeutic targeting

Date:
12
Monday
September
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: CANCER RESEARCH CLUB
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Professor Nira Ben-Jonathan
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Exploring New Ground in Basic and Translational Cancer Research (1st Weizmann-NKI Conference)

Date:
04
Sunday
September
2016
-
06
Tuesday
September
2016
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
Contact: http://

G-INCPM - Special Seminar - Prof. Matthias Nees, Institute if Biomedicine, Univ. of Turku, Finland - "Combining Speed of Analysis with Complex Tissue Models for Physiologically Relevant High-Content Screening"

Date:
24
Wednesday
August
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:30
Location: Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
Lecturer: Prof. Matthias Nees
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: In vitro model systems used in drug discovery typically do not address the compl ...In vitro model systems used in drug discovery typically do not address the complex architecture of human disease tissues. Only few approaches aim to faithfully recapitulate the complexity, heterogeneity and cellular dynamics e.g. in epithelial tissues and carcinomas. The most important aspects relate to the (tumor-) microenvironment, including cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, inflammation and the role of stromal components. All of these elements can have a significant, but often underestimated impact on differentiation, normal and abnormal tissue functions, or drug response versus drug resistance. The basis for performing informative high content screening campaigns with such complex tissue models in vitro is access to fast, automated image analysis. We have developed a software platform (AMIDA, Automated Morphometric Image Data Analysis) that captures a large number of morphometric features in an unsupervised fashion. This approach enables us to capture much of the inherent complexity and dynamics of microtissues, yet still allows high experimental throughput. This screening platform is ideally suited for investigating a broad spectrum of defined, biological questions in drug discovery as well as personalised medicine. Technology and screening platform are applicable for multiple types of research, such as quantitatively measuring the response of primary cancer cells or cell lines to drugs, siRNAs or other perturbations. Image analysis algorithms can also be adapted towards specific applications in neurodegenerative diseases, stem cell research, and to quantitate the interaction of epithelial cells with immune, adipocytes or mesenchymal stem cells.

Requirement of FcγR pathways for the anti tumor activity of immunomodulatory antibodies

Date:
28
Tuesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Dr. Rony Dahan
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Metabolic and redox oscillations in the circadian (24 hour) clockwork

Date:
28
Tuesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Akhilesh B. Reddy
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: Every cell in the body has its own molecular 24 hour clock, allowing it to coord ...Every cell in the body has its own molecular 24 hour clock, allowing it to coordinate its daily activities, just as we use a watch to organise our daily lives. This fact has become more and more important as we live in a "24/7 culture”, with transatlantic air travel and shift-work being part of normal life for an estimated 25% of Europeans. Desynchronizations that disrupt our daily clock, and thus our regular physiology, are now linked to diseases such as diabetes, obesity, neurodegeneration and cancer. We have uncovered novel mechanisms about how the clock functions to maintain 24 hour time. Our work in red blood cells and marine algae has exposed the surprising and unanticipated role of redox (chemical) oscillations as key drivers in cellular timing. A family of proteins called the peroxiredoxins are a key readout of the clockwork, and their circadian oscillation is, remarkably, conserved in all phylogenetic domains of life, including Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryotes. Thus, redox mechanisms are deeply embedded within the clockwork of multiple species, in stark contrast to the lack of evolutionary conservation of transcriptional components of the clockwork. Indeed, targeting redox oscillations using novel compounds directed towards peroxiredoxin proteins provides a new route to modifying 24 hour oscillations for potential health gains in multiple organ systems. Metabolic and redox processes in cells are thus intimately linked to the clockwork, and in particular we have recently found that the redox-sensitive transcription factor NRF2 is an important communication route linking redox and transcriptional rhythms.

Stress kinase signaling in cancer

Date:
22
Wednesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Angel R. Nebreda
Organizer: Feinberg Graduate School

The Power of Single Cells: Tumor Heterogeneity and Ecosystem

Date:
19
Sunday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Professor Dana Pe'er
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

MCB Student Seminar

Date:
14
Tuesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:30
Title: PYK2 as a therapeutic target in basal-like TNBC & RGS7 is recurrently mutated in melanoma and promotes cell migration and invasion of human cancer cells
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Dr. Anna Mueller and Dr. Nouar Qutob
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

Tumor microbiome-mediated chemoresistance

Date:
14
Tuesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Dr. Ravid Straussman
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: Resistance to chemotherapy in advanced cancer patients is a pressing problem. De ...Resistance to chemotherapy in advanced cancer patients is a pressing problem. Despite a sharp surge in novel anti-cancer drugs, complete clinical response to chemotherapy is very rare and the onset of resistance is almost always the rule. Previously, we have studied the effects of the tumor microenvironment on the innate, up-front resistance to chemotherapy, demonstrating that normal (non-cancer) cells inside tumors can render cancer cells resistant to chemotherapy. In the last couple of years we have extended our work to study the role that bacteria in the tumor microenvironment might have on chemoresistance. As a first step we have characterized the bacteria in hundreds of human tumor samples representing many common tumor types including breast cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer and colorectal cancer. We then used in-vitro and in-vivo models to test for the effects of these bacteria on chemoresistance and dissected the molecular mechanisms that underlie these effects. Our result point to a potential role of intra tumor bacteria in modulating sensitivity to both conventional as well as targeted therapies and point to novel treatment directions to overcome these effects.

Deciphering the nutrition-microbiome-metabolism axis

Date:
13
Monday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Dr. Eran Elinav
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Highlights in Immunology 2016

Date:
09
Thursday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 13:30
Title: Cell death and ubiquitin in inflammation, immunity and cancer
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Walczak Henning
Organizer: Department of Immunology

"The systemic effects of tumor-derived exosomes for pre-metastatic niche formation and subsequent metastasis

Date:
07
Tuesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Prof. David Lyden
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Apoptosis Control by the Unfolded Protein Response

Date:
07
Tuesday
June
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Dr. Avi Ashkenazi
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: Protein folding by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is physiologically critical. P ...Protein folding by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is physiologically critical. Protein misfolding causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore cellular homeostasis. However, if mitigation fails, the UPR induces apoptotic cell elimination, through mechanisms that remain elusive. We have found that unresolved ER stress promotes apoptosis through cell-autonomous activation of death receptor 5 (DR5). The UPR mediator CHOP induces DR5 transcription, while the RNase IRE1 promotes transient DR5 mRNA decay. Persistent ER stress leads to intracellular DR5 protein accumulation and ligand-independent activation, triggering caspase-mediated apoptosis. IRE1 disruption in multiple myeloma cells augments apoptosis and attenuates tumor growth in mice, implicating IRE1 as a potential cancer-therapeutic target.

Active DNA Demethylation in Development and Cancer

Date:
30
Monday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:00-13:30
Location: Camelia Botnar Building
Lecturer: Prof. Alfonso Bellacosa
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences

Protection mechanisms of cancer prevention - lessons from the heart

Date:
25
Wednesday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:00-13:00
Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Lecturer: Dr. Rachel Sarig
Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

G-INCPM-Special Seminar - Prof. Rivka Inzelberg, Specialist in Neurology and Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University - "Parkinson’s disease: lessons from observations over time"

Date:
24
Tuesday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:30
Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
Lecturer: Prof. Rivka Inzelberg
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: Epidemiological studies show an atypical cancer pattern in patients with Parkins ...Epidemiological studies show an atypical cancer pattern in patients with Parkinson’s disease. While many cancers are rarer than the general population in Parkinson’s cohorts, some cancers and especially melanoma are observed at higher than expected rates. Nowadays, several PARK genes have been found to be associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. The possible contribution of PARK genes to the atypical cancer pattern of Parkinson’s disease patients and to melanoma co-occurrence will be discussed. The second part of the talk focuses on the awakening of novel artistic skills in patients with Parkinson’ disease. The appearance of previously unknown creativity may accompany neurodegeneration. Despite motor symptomatology, Parkinson’s patients develop fine artistic capabilities after the diagnosis of the disease. Observations form the clinic and mechanisms will be discussed.

Chemical probes of protease activity: applications to optical surgical guidance and drug development

Date:
24
Tuesday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Matthew Bogyo
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: Proteases are enzymes that often play pathogenic roles in many common human dise ...Proteases are enzymes that often play pathogenic roles in many common human diseases such as cancer, asthma, arthritis, atherosclerosis and infection by pathogens. Therefore tools that can be used to dynamically monitor their activity can be used as diagnostic agents, as imaging contrast agents for intraoperative image guidance and for the identification of novel classes of protease-targeted drugs. In the first part of this presentation, I will describe our efforts to design and synthesize small molecule probes that produce a fluorescent signal upon binding to a protease target. We have identified probes that show tumor-specific retention, fast activation kinetics, and rapid systemic distribution making them useful for real-time fluorescence guided tumor resection and other diagnostic imaging applications. In the second half of the presentation, I will present our recent advances using chemical probes to target the proteasome in the parasite pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria. The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation. Proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the parasite at all stages of its life cycle, including the transmissive gametocyte stages. However, all compounds that have been tested also inhibit the mammalian proteasome resulting in toxicity. We used a recently developed substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and parasite 20S proteasome cores. We designed inhibitors based on amino acid preferences specific to the P. falciparum proteasome, and found that they preferentially inhibit the tryptic-like subunit β2. We determined the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to our inhibitor using cryo-EM and single particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparumβ2 active site and provide valuable information regarding active site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, we observed growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β2 selective inhibitor in artemisinin (ART) sensitive and resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrated that a parasite selective inhibitor attenuates parasite growth in vivo without significant toxicity to the host. Thus, the Plasmodium proteasome is a chemically tractable target for next generation anti-malarial agents.

The Ratio Between Distinct Subsets Dictates Overall Neutrophil Contribution in Cancer

Date:
23
Monday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: CANCER RESEARCH CLUB SEMINAR
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Prof. Zvi Granot
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

The 8th ISCR Meeting on Breakthroughs in Cancer Research: The Future is Now

Date:
19
Thursday
May
2016
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: Michael and Anna Wix Auditorium

BREAKTHROUGHS IN CANCER RESEARCH: THE FUTURE IS NOW

Date:
19
Thursday
May
2016
Conference
Time: 08:00-18:30
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

BRAF and NRAS signalling in melanoma: basic biology to clinical responses

Date:
18
Wednesday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: CANCER RESEARCH CLUB SEMINAR
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Richard Marais
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Dissecting the complex tumor ecosystem:

Date:
16
Monday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Intra-tumor heterogeneity in glioma and melanoma
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Dr. Itay Tirosh
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Diverse high throughput technologies in cancer research and in synthetic biology

Date:
09
Monday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Dr. Zohar Yakhini
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
Abstract: The development of high throughput molecular measurement approaches enables much ...The development of high throughput molecular measurement approaches enables much deeper understanding of cellular and disease related processes. The introduction of new measurement technology is always tied with computational design and optimization work as well as with the need to develop efficient data analysis and interpretation tools. I will describe data analysis and design methods and results with an emphasis on jointly analyzing data from several molecular measurement sources, such as serum glycomics and tumor transcriptomics. I will also describe the use of synthetic oligonucleotides to address new measurement and optimization questions.

MCB Student Seminar

Date:
03
Tuesday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:30
Title: A regulatory module involving FGF13, miR-504 and p53 regulates ribosomal biogenesis and supports cancer cell survival. Neuron-neuron interactions during neuronal remodelling in the Drosophila
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Debora Bublik; Oded Mayseless
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

TOOKAD®-soluble VTP: milestones on the road from local tumor ablation to systemic cancer control.

Date:
03
Tuesday
May
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Avigdor Scherz
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Details: In collaboration with Prof. Yoram Salomon of the Institute’s Department of Biological Regulation, Prof. Scherz has designed a new approach to cancer therapy, termed Vascular Targeted Photodynamic Therapy (VTP), in which illumination of tumors after the infusion of novel compounds derived from chlorophylls causes highly confined non-thermal tumor ablation by generating high intensity pulse of oxygen and nitric oxide radicals. This method has been recently granted first approval for the treatment of early stage, localized prostate cancer after accomplished phase III clinical trials in 43 and 8 hospitals in Europe and Latin America, respectively. Recent findings in collaboration with researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering cancer Institute (MSKCC) unveiled systemic antitumor immunity following VTP that is highly augmented by various immune modulators. These and previous data have provided the ground to four new clinical studies that are currently lunched in MSKCC including urinary, breast, esophageal and more advanced prostate cancers. In the last 5 years the lab of Prof. Scherz is also developing novel approaches for the treatment of keratoconus and degenerative myopia. In the field of photosynthesis, Prof. Scherz’s group has recently resolved structural elements that enable different organisms to perform photosynthesis in extreme conditions; the group has developed a new thermo-tolerant species for increased biomass production under stress.

The 2016 Justen Passwell Symposium: Gaps in Translational Hemato-Oncology

Date:
01
Sunday
May
2016
-
02
Monday
May
2016
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

MCB Student Seminar

Date:
19
Tuesday
April
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 13:00-14:00
Title: Mutant p53 enhances the signal of HGF to endow cancer cells with drug resistance Early commitment and robust differentiation in intestinal crypts
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Yan Stein, Beata Toth-Cohen
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

G-INCPM-Special Seminar - Prof. Hagit Eldar-Finkelman, Dept. of Human Molecules Genetics & Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University - "Glycogen synthase kinase-3: From Evolution to Drug Discovery"

Date:
13
Wednesday
April
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:30
Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
Lecturer: Prof. Hagit Eldar-Finkelman
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: The serine threonine kinase glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a promising dr ...The serine threonine kinase glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a promising drug discovery target in diverse pathological disorders. GSK-3 was initially implicated in glycogen metabolism, however, the enzyme has surprised us with a host of additional regulated processes related to other disease states including cancer, psychiatric disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases. Indeed, treatment with GSK-3 inhibitors produces significant therapeutic benefits in multiple disease-animal models. How one enzyme can be involved in such diverse processes is not fully clear. It is possible that common targets regulated by GSK-3 have different biological impacts in different tissues and/or different cellular conditions. To tackle this problem we use cell systems that either overexpress GSK-3 or inhibit its activity selectively and screen for potential downstream factors in a ‘hypothesis free’ approach. Our studies identified the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a GSK-3 target. Accordingly GSK-3 was found to regulate autophagy and lysosomal acidification. These findings suggested a new paradigm in which GSK-3 serves as a molecular switch of biosynthesis and protein turnover. Hence, inhibition of GSK-3 re-balances protein homeostasis, often impaired in pathogenesis, which in turn ameliorates disease severity and disease progression. An additional, and complementary, aspect of our work is development of selective GSK-3 inhibitors. We developed a pipeline of substrate competitive GSK-3 inhibitors that show high selectivity and excellent pharmacological properties. The strategy for design of selective GSK-3 inhibitors and screening for potential new inhibitors will be also discussed.

Nanotechnological strategies for subcellular targeted delivery of drugs and nucleotides

Date:
11
Monday
April
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Prof. Joseph Kost
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Ubiquitin Ligases in Cancer Metabolism and Resistance

Date:
07
Thursday
April
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Department of Immunology Guest Seminar
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Ze’ev Ronai
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Ras-inhibitors as therapeutic targets in gastointestinal cancers

Date:
06
Wednesday
April
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Dr. Elke Burgermeister
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

The tumor microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia as a target for therapy

Date:
06
Wednesday
April
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 09:00-10:00
Title: Department of Immunology Special Guest Seminar
Location: Ullmann Building of Life Sciences
Lecturer: Dr. Martina Seiffert
Organizer: Department of Immunology

Leukemia as a developmental disease

Date:
21
Monday
March
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Prof. Shai Izraeli
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

A brief history of DNA repair Tribute to the 2015 Chemistry Nobel Prize laureates

Date:
01
Tuesday
March
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 10:00-11:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Zvi Livneh
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: DNA damage is continuously formed at a staggering rate of about 50,000 lesions/g ...DNA damage is continuously formed at a staggering rate of about 50,000 lesions/genome/day, which may cause severe malfunction during DNA replication and transcription. Therefore, life as we know it depends on DNA repair mechanisms, and germ-line mutations in DNA repair genes cause a broad spectrum of human disease including cancer, immunological deficiencies and neurodegenerative diseases. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Thomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar, who made fundamental contributions to deciphering molecular mechanisms of DNA repair. A brief history of DNA repair will be presented, highlighting the contributions of the Nobel Prize laureates.

The landscape of DNA methylation in cancer; therapeutic and diagnostic implications

Date:
29
Monday
February
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Dr. Moshe Szyf
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Common mechanism links ER stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and cell death.

Date:
08
Monday
February
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00
Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: Prof. Menachem Rubinstein
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

Towards precision oncology: uncovering tumor-specific amino acid vulnerabilities by differential ribosome codon reading

Date:
07
Sunday
February
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Prof. Reuven Agami
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

p53 and Li-Fraumeni syndrome: A 25 Year Marriage of Science and Medicine

Date:
28
Thursday
January
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 00:00
Title: Cancer Research Club
Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
Lecturer: David Malkin
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

How transcription and chromatin state affect DNA repair: A high-resolution genomic study.

Date:
21
Thursday
January
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:30
Location: Camelia Botnar Building
Lecturer: Dr. Sheera Adar
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: Abstract Damages in DNA present a barrier to transcription and DNA replication. ...Abstract Damages in DNA present a barrier to transcription and DNA replication. Nucleotide excision repair is the sole mechanism for removing bulky adducts from the human genome. Such adducts include damages formed by ultraviolet (UV) radiation and the chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin and oxaliplatin. To understand how excision repair is orchestrated despite the packaging of DNA into chromatin, and how repair is coordinated with active transcription, we developed two novel genomic methods for mapping DNA damages and DNA repair at high resolution. These genome-wide maps reveal preferential repair of actively transcribed and open chromatin regions. This includes not only annotated genes but also regulatory regions in the genome. Conversely, repair at heterochromatic and repressed regions is relatively low and continues even two days following UV irradiation. Comparing repair kinetics with existing somatic mutation data from cancer cells shows late-repaired regions are associated with a higher level of cancer-linked mutations. The new genomic assays we’ve developed will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability, and understanding the genetic and epigenetic changes resulting from genotoxic stress.

G-INCPM Special Seminar - Prof. Yosef Yarden, Dept. of Biological Regulation, Weizmann - "Signaling and Therapy of Hard to Treat Cancers"

Date:
20
Wednesday
January
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:30
Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
Lecturer: Prof. Yosef Yarden
Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
Abstract: Tumor-specific combinations of oncogenic mutations often free cancer cells from ...Tumor-specific combinations of oncogenic mutations often free cancer cells from their reliance on growth factors. One important example comprises the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its kin, HER2. In tumors, both EGFR and HER2 frequently display overexpression, internal deletions and point mutations. Accordingly, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) specific to these receptors have been approved for clinical applications. My lecture will introduce EGFR and HER2 in the context of a signaling network comprising two additional receptors, HER3 and HER4, and 11 growth factors, all sharing an EGF-like structure and binding to HER family members. The principles of network biology, such as rewiring, robustness and pathway redundancy, translate to short–term responses to oncology drugs. In other words, patients treated with drugs intercepting EGFR or HER2 often develop resistance due to emergence of compensatory mechanisms. My lecture will exemplify these principles in context of several relatively hard to treat tumors. The tumors I will discuss include breast cancers, both HER2-enriched and triple-negative, ovarian cancer and advanced non-small cell lung tumors that acquired resistance to EGFR’s TKIs.

MCB Student Seminar

Date:
12
Tuesday
January
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 12:30
Title: Galectins as regulators of bone remodeling and The Lats2 tumor suppressor inhibits cholesterol metabolism
Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
Lecturer: Yaron Vinik, Yael Aylon
Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

Combinatorial protein engineering of proteolytically resistant mesotrypsin inhibitors as candidates for cancer therapy

Date:
05
Tuesday
January
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
Lecturer: Dr. Niv Papo
Organizer: Department of Structural Biology

Cancer Research Seminar - Genetic approaches to understanding Ras and p53 biology

Date:
04
Monday
January
2016
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
Lecturer: Tyler Jacks
Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation