Upcoming

All upcoming events

Special seminar with Dr. Yaara Oren

Date:
16
Monday
August
2021
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 15:00-16:00
Title: Beyond Darwin: understanding cancer persister cells
Lecturer: Dr. Yaara Oren
Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
Details: zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96160519106?pwd=ZSs0NXd0WWZSaTBQTTRxSkZ5dmRvdz09
Abstract: Despite favorable initial response to therapy, a third of cancer patients will d ... Read more Despite favorable initial response to therapy, a third of cancer patients will develop recurrent disease and succumb to it within five years of diagnosis. While there has been much progress in characterizing the pathways that contribute to stable genetic drug resistance, the mechanisms underlying early reversible resistance, also known as persisters-driven resistance, remain largely unknown. It has long been believed that persisters represent a subset of cells that happen to be non-proliferating at the time of treatment, and therefore can survive drugs that preferentially kill rapidly proliferating cells. However, in my talk I will describe a rare persister population which, despite not harboring any resistance-conferring mutation, can maintain proliferative capacity in the presence of drug. To study this rare, transiently-resistant, cycling persister population, we developed Watermelon, a high-complexity expressed barcode lentiviral library for simultaneous tracing of each cell’s clonal origin and proliferative and transcriptional states. We combine single cell transcriptomics with imaging and metabolomics to show that cycling and non-cycling persisters arise from different cell lineages with distinct transcriptional and metabolic programs. Finally, I will describe how by studying persister cells we can gain critical insights on cellular memory, fate, and evolution, which can guide the development of better anti-cancer treatments.
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Modeling and targeting cancer aneuploidy

Date:
07
Thursday
October
2021
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
Lecturer: Prof. Uri Ben-David
Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

From Basic Cancer Research to Innovative Therapies

Date:
28
Monday
March
2022
-
30
Wednesday
March
2022
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium

18th International p53 Workshop

Date:
22
Sunday
May
2022
-
26
Thursday
May
2022
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium

Cancer ImmunoMetabolism 2021

Date:
11
Sunday
September
2022
-
14
Wednesday
September
2022
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Past

    All Events

    Imm Guest Seminar: Dr. Yael David will lecture on " Uncovering Cancer-Associated Epigenetic Events Using Novel Chemical Tools."

    Date:
    22
    Thursday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Yael David
    Organizer: Department of Immunology
    Details: Light refreshments will be served at 10:40.

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    12
    Monday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:30
    Title: Beyond Darwin: understanding cancer persister cells
    Lecturer: Dr. Yaara Oren
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97339959821?pwd=QkloVEFNVGMwWjlzMWRrSTQyMUZhQT09

    Love the neighbor – Unraveling the tumor microenvironment using multiplexed imaging

    Date:
    08
    Thursday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Leeat Keren
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Single Cell Atlases as Roadmaps in Pediatric Cancer

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00-17:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Aviv Regev
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    The success and challenges of introducing PARP inhibitors into the therapy of ovarian cancer- a clinician’s perspective

    Date:
    17
    Thursday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Jonathan A Ledermann BSc MD FRCP FMedSci
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    GOING TO EXTREMES: STUDIES WITH RARE EXCEPTIONAL SURVIVORS OF OVARIAN CANCER.

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Lecturer: Prof. David Bowtell
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    New Experimental Methods in Cancer Research - Workshop

    Date:
    31
    Monday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 08:00-17:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Breast tumor evolution

    Date:
    26
    Wednesday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Kornelia Polyak
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    The two faces of NF-ĸB – the ‘canonical’ tumor promoter and the ‘non-canonical’ tumor suppressor

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Aaron Ciechanover
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Clinical development of mRNA vaccines and therapeutics: COVID and beyond

    Date:
    09
    Sunday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:15-10:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium
    Lecturer: Dr. Tal Zaks
    Details: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94905298503
    Abstract: mRNA based vaccines prevent COVID-19 infections, putting them at the forefront o ... Read more mRNA based vaccines prevent COVID-19 infections, putting them at the forefront of the current global fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. The scientific and clinical development of mRNA medicines, which began in ernest only ~10 years ago, has the potential to not only change the landscape of infectious disease vaccines but to also impact the treatment of cancer, genetic metabolic, autoimmune, and cardiovascular diseases. This talk will review the translational medicine approach to the research and development of both infectious disease vaccines, as exemplified by COVID-19 vaccine Moderna, as well as other applications of mRNA medicines currently in clinical development. ᐧ
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    Heat Shock Factor 1-dependent extracellular matrix remodeling mediates the transition from chronic intestinal inflammation to colon cancer

    Date:
    27
    Tuesday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Oshrat Galibov-Levi
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: In the colon, long-term exposure to chronic inflammation drives colitis-associat ... Read more In the colon, long-term exposure to chronic inflammation drives colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). However, molecular understanding of how this occurs is still lacking. Within the tumor, cancer cells are surrounded by a variety of non-malignant cells and by the extracellular matrix (ECM), which together compose the tumor microenvironment (TME), which is essential for tumor homeostasis and progression. While the cancer cells are highly mutated, the stromal cells are genomically stable. Master regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) was shown to play an important part in the transcriptional reprogramming of the TME. By using proteomic and advanced methods of microscopy and image analysis we show that HSF1-dependent ECM remodeling plays a crucial role in mediating inflammation-driven colon cancer. /j/95881429481?pwd=VkxwUmg1Z2ErZmhpZDJqMTZwellGZz09
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    Therapeutic Exploitation of Metabolic Vulnerabilities of Cancer

    Date:
    22
    Thursday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Eyal Gottlieb
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Inactivation of DNA repair and high dose Vitamin C boost cancer immunotherapy

    Date:
    08
    Thursday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Alberto Bardelli
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    VEGF/vascular-centered view of the tumor microenvironment and aging

    Date:
    25
    Thursday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Eli Keshet
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Inflammation, Metabolism and Immunity in Liver Cancer: From Pathogenesis to Treatment

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Lecturer: Dr. Michael Karin
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Proteasome profiling meets precision oncology

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    February
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Lecturer: Dr. Yifat Merbl
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Targeted protein degradation for the treatment of cancer

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    February
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Studying resistance in cancer

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Getz Gad
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Quantitative Prediction of Nanoparticle Assembly for Personalized Nanomedicine

    Date:
    17
    Sunday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Yosi Shamay
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92447973616?pwd=UWJkRWdraGFVQjdPb3ByWis1b ... Read more Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92447973616?pwd=UWJkRWdraGFVQjdPb3ByWis1bDk2Zz09 Development of targeted nanoparticle for personalized cancer therapeutics often requires complex synthetic schemes involving both supramolecular self-assembly and multiple chemical modifications. These processes are generally difficult to predict, execute, and control. I will describe a new method to accurately and quantitatively predict self-assembly of kinase inhibitors drug molecules into nanoparticles based on their molecular structures. The drugs assemble with the aid of new kind of excipient comprised of highly conjugated sulfated molecule into particles with ultra-high drug loadings of up to 90%. Using quantitative structure-nanoparticle assembly prediction (QSNAP) calculations and machine learning, a new algorithm was developed as highly predictive indicators of both nano-self assembly and nanoparticle size with unprecedented accuracy.
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    Molecular mechanisms of senescence on the crossroads of cancer and aging

    Date:
    14
    Thursday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Valery Krizhanovsky
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00-17:30
    Title: "Dietary sulfur amino acids modulate kidney function and anti-tumor immunity via the gut microbiota"
    Lecturer: Dr. Lior Lobel
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Mee ... Read more https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Meeting ID: 964 6089 5671 Password: 599560
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    PCR-free sensing of Covid-19, metastatic mRNA biomarkers and towards single-cell proteomic

    Date:
    03
    Sunday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Amit Meller
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98521602060?pwd=T1B1TEJqcXEwUW50QzBEaXd3R ... Read more Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98521602060?pwd=T1B1TEJqcXEwUW50QzBEaXd3RS9XZz09 SARS-CoV-2 outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has underlined the acute need for extremely sensitive, accurate, fast, point-of-care mRNA quantification sensors. Here I will show how solid-state nanopores can be used to digitally count target mRNA molecules from both biological and clinical Covid-19 samples surpassing the accuracy and gold-standard” RT-qPCR. Additionally, we applied our method for the sensing of cancer metastatic mRNA biomarkers MACC1 and S100A4 at early stage of the diseases, suggesting a potential use of the method in early precision medicine diagnostics. Moving beyond nucleic acids, I will discuss our on-going efforts towards the use of plasmonic nanopore devices for the single protein molecules identification based on partial labelling of only two or three amino acids. This research opens up vast directions for single-cell proteomics of even rarely expressed proteins.
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    The transformation of healthcare through AI technologies: The story of breast cancer

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96689343910?pwd=VGlpaGNOejVWTGdveXJzeDdjYXdUdz09
    Lecturer: Dr. Michal Rosen-Zvi

    Stromal dynamic plasticity shapes the microenvironment in breast cancer metastasis

    Date:
    17
    Thursday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: People behind the science
    Lecturer: Prof. Neta Erez, PhD
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Cancer evolution, immune evasion and metastasis

    Date:
    19
    Thursday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Charles Swanton MD PhD FMedSci FRS
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Love thy neighbor - unraveling the tumor microenvironment by multiplexed imaging

    Date:
    17
    Tuesday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Leeat Keren
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Tumors are spatially organized ecosystems that are comprised of distinct cell ty ... Read more Tumors are spatially organized ecosystems that are comprised of distinct cell types, each of which can assume a variety of phenotypes defined by coexpression of multiple proteins. To underscore this complexity, and move beyond single cells to multicellular interactions, it is essential to interrogate cellular expression patterns within their native context in the tissue. We have pioneered MIBI-TOF (Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging by Time of Flight), a platform that enables simultaneous imaging of forty proteins within intact tissue sections at subcellular resolution. In this talk, I will describe our application of multiplexed imaging to study the tumor immune microenvironment in triple negative breast cancer. Our work reveals archetypical organizations, linking molecular expression patterns, cell composition and histology, which are predictive of patient survival.
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    Recent Advances in Flow and Imaging Flow Cytometry

    Date:
    05
    Thursday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Title: Briefs
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96479787051?pwd=cGx2eHhNeEc3WE9sbnV1ZW1oYWI2QT09
    Lecturer: Dr. Ziv Porat
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    Order from Chaos: Chromosome Catastrophes Drive Cancer Evolution

    Date:
    03
    Tuesday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Ofer Shoshani
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Details: Via Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97929291684?pwd=R2tFbmoweThSbmliYU9OZGFRTn ... Read more Via Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97929291684?pwd=R2tFbmoweThSbmliYU9OZGFRTnlqUT09 Passcode: 834392
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    Abstract: Chromosomal instability is one of the major hallmarks in cancer driving numerica ... Read more Chromosomal instability is one of the major hallmarks in cancer driving numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Cancer cells can use the chaotic background of chromosome instability to generate ordered genomic events leading to accelerated tumor formation or drug resistance. First, I will discuss how transient centrosome amplification can induce a burst of chromosomal instability in vivo. This triggers the formation of random aneuploidies (changes in chromosome numbers) with cancer initiating cells carrying a specific aneuploidy signature leading to accelerated tumorigenesis. This work has uncovered aneuploidy as a direct driver of cancer and enables a better understanding of the involvement of specific aneuploidies in cancer. Second, I will describe how chromothripsis, the catastrophic shattering of a chromosome and random religation of its pieces, can promote resistance to therapy. Using cancer cells and patient samples, I identified that chromothripsis drives the formation and evolution of extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA) elements that can amplify genes conferring drug resistance. Chromothripsis depends on non-homologous DNA end joining repair, a vulnerability that could be exploited for therapeutic purposes by preventing resistance to chemotherapy. I will conclude by discussing an outlook towards the exciting new directions opened by this work.
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    BRCA mutations rewire stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment

    Date:
    29
    Thursday
    October
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr Ruth Scherz-Shouval
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Effects of p16Ink4a and cellular senescence on tissue function and cancer development

    Date:
    15
    Thursday
    October
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Ittai Ben-Porath
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Germinal centers and immunological niches

    Date:
    13
    Tuesday
    October
    2020
    -
    16
    Friday
    October
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Tumor exosome biomarkers for early cancer detection

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    September
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: David Lyden MD, PhD
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Reversing personalized medicine

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    September
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:30-14:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Gal Markel
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Details: the link for the lecture's zoom room https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd= ... Read more the link for the lecture's zoom room https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
    Close details
    Abstract: Personalized medicine in oncology is focused on fitting drugs to the appropriat ... Read more Personalized medicine in oncology is focused on fitting drugs to the appropriate patients, mainly by identifying unique mutations in tumor genomics and development of highly selective drugs. The main challenge is that the relevant populations grow smaller, while development costs are constant, leading to significant reduction in effective drug development. The immune system provides personalized anti cancer response, and immune checkpoint inhibitors enable decent responses over a wide array of tumors. The outstanding challenge is that efficacy is observed in less than a third of the patients. Here we explore strategies to alter the patient in a way that will enable standard of care immunotherapy to exert its full potential, i.e. fitting the patients to the existing immunotherapeutic medications.
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    New pre-clinical tools for guiding efficient therapies against head and neck cancer

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    August
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Moshe Elkabets
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Deciphering the immunogenomic landscape in melanoma

    Date:
    29
    Wednesday
    July
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Yardena Samuels
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research

    ClearSight™: A portable system that uses diffusion NMR to probe the margins of excised tumors

    Date:
    16
    Thursday
    July
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Lecturer: Dr. Saul Stokar
    Organizer: Clore Institute for High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy
    Abstract: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91154950215?pwd=ZkRsTWJzL1AzMWpNbFVSVUF4d0 ... Read more Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91154950215?pwd=ZkRsTWJzL1AzMWpNbFVSVUF4d05zQT09 Password: 388848 Diffusion NMR weighted NMR and MRI are very powerful techniques for investigating microscopic details about tissue architecture, either normal or in a diseased state. In addition to its traditional use in diagnosing stroke and ischemic injury in the brain, in recent years DWI has been used to diagnose various kinds of cancer, including breast, prostate and lung cancers. In this seminar we will present an overview of a novel portable system that uses DWI to check whether the margins of excised breast tumors are tumor-free. This is extremely important both for the patient and the hospital, since it obviates the need to perform additional surgery if the subsequent pathology indicates the presence of tumor on the margin of the excised tissue, something that occurs today in up to 25% of breast-conserving surgeries. We shall provide an overview of diffusion MRI, the unique challenges of performing MRI in or near the operating theater, the architecture of ClearCut's system, computer simulations of its performance and an overview of the clinical results obtained to date.
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    Sparsity-based Methods for Rapid MRI

    Date:
    25
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Lecturer: Dr. Efrat Shimron
    Organizer: Clore Institute for High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy
    Abstract: Zoom Lecture: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99058507421 Magnetic Resonance Ima ... Read more Zoom Lecture: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99058507421 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a superb imaging modality that provides high-quality images of the human body. However, one of its major limitations is the long acquisition time, which hinders the MRI clinical use. The acquisition time can be shortened by acquiring less data; however, this requires suitable methods for accurate image reconstruction from subsampled data, which is acquired with a sub-Nyquist rate. In this seminar, four novel methods for image reconstruction from subsampled data will be presented. These methods build upon the well-established frameworks of Parallel Imaging (PI) and Compressed Sensing (CS), utilize a-priori knowledge about data sparsity, and address current limitations of PI-CS methods. The first two methods accelerate static MRI scans by introducing the Convolution-based Reconstruction (CORE) framework, which offers a parameter-free non-iterative reconstruction. Experiments with in-vivo 7T brain data demonstrated that these methods perform comparably to the well-established GRAPPA and l1-SPIRiT methods, with the advantage of shorter computation times and reduced need for parameter calibration. The next two developed methods accelerate dynamic MRI scans that provide temperature monitoring in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) thermal ablation treatments. The developed methods enable rapid MR monitoring by reconstructing temperature changes from subsampled data. Validation experiments were performed with in-vivo data from clinical treatments of prostate cancer in humans; these showed that the proposed methods significantly outperform two state-of-the-art methods in the temperature reconstruction task
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    A new dawn for eosinophils in the tumor microenvironment

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Ariel Munitz
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research

    Cancer Research Club - Prof Dan Landau: Novel genomics perspectives on cancer evolution: from basic principles to therapeutic optimization

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Dan Landau
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Using small molecules to study translational control by eIF1A

    Date:
    12
    Tuesday
    May
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:45
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Daniel Hayat
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulato ... Read more Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulatory factor yet little is known about its exact role in the translation process of mammalian cells. Previous work in our lab have shown that eIF1A interacts with ribosomal proteins RPS3 and RPS10 and these interactions are disrupted by eIF1A cancer-associated mutants. As the activities of eIF1A are critically dependent on its ability to bind the ribosome, we targeted eIF1A-RPS10 complex to identify eIF1A inhibitors, using high throughput drug screen. We found 21 eIF1A inhibitors which affected eIF1A known translational roles and divided them to groups according to the protein they bind. Several inhibitors which can differentiate between eIF1A known functions were identified and inhibitor 1Ai-5662 showed dramatic affect in decreasing uveal melanoma cells viability. Our results show the benefits of using small molecules research approach.
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    "The transformation of Healthcare through AI technologies: the story of breast cancer"

    Date:
    22
    Sunday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Michal Rosen-Zvi

    Using small molecules to study translational control by eIF1A

    Date:
    17
    Tuesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-10:45
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Daniel Hayat
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulato ... Read more Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulatory factor yet little is known about its exact role in the translation process of mammalian cells. Previous work in our lab have shown that eIF1A interacts with ribosomal proteins RPS3 and RPS10 and these interactions are disrupted by eIF1A cancer-associated mutants. As the activities of eIF1A are critically dependent on its ability to bind the ribosome, we targeted eIF1A-RPS10 complex to identify eIF1A inhibitors, using high throughput drug screen. We found 21 eIF1A inhibitors which affected eIF1A known translational roles and divided them to groups according to the protein they bind. Several inhibitors which can differentiate between eIF1A known functions were identified and inhibitor 1Ai-5662 showed dramatic affect in decreasing uveal melanoma cells viability. Our results show the benefits of using small molecules research approach.
    Close abstract

    Mechanisms of cancer protection in Laron Syndrome

    Date:
    12
    Thursday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Haim Werner
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Introduction to the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center and DNA targeted cancer therapeutics

    Date:
    05
    Thursday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Stanton L Gerson MD
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    MR spectroscopy at 7 tesla – initial experiences in Glasgow

    Date:
    05
    Thursday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Dr Graeme Keith
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Much has been written of the potential of ultra-high field MR scanners, such as ... Read more Much has been written of the potential of ultra-high field MR scanners, such as 7 tesla, due to their inherently higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This native boost is of great use in making techniques that operate in a low SNR regime, such as spectroscopy, more viable. Application of spectroscopic techniques at 7 tesla also come with a secondary, yet perhaps more important benefit in increased spectral resolution. This can allow for the quantitative investigation of metabolites that are difficult to resolve and measure reliably at lower field strengths. This seminar will relate early experiences in spectroscopy from the Siemens Terra 7T system at the University of Glasgow. This will include the optimisation of single voxel techniques for clinical studies, such as the measurement of glutamate in neuroinflammatory conditions, as well as an update on development work, such as a spectral 2D correlated spectroscopy (COSY) acquisition for investigation of glioma tumours, including a focus on 2-hydorxyglutarate. It will also cover the development of a novel MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) technique based on the EPSI sequence, which will allow for high resolution, full spectral bandwidth 7T acquisitions in a clinically viable time, by application of compressed sensing methods
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    Pushing the Limits of Fluorescence in a Fluorochrome Limited World

    Date:
    04
    Wednesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: Introducing the Aurora Spectral Flow Cytometry
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Joanne Lannigan, M.Sc
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Details: Cytek Biosciences and the Weismann Institute are pleased to announce that Cytek ... Read more Cytek Biosciences and the Weismann Institute are pleased to announce that Cytek will be presenting a seminar on the Aurora system. This novel flow cytometer expands the breadth of applications that are currently available on conventional cytometers. The system incorporates a new technology that maximizes the benefits of spectral flow cytometry. Please join us for a seminar by Joanne Lannigan, where the following topics will be discussed: • Why do spectral flow cytometry? • Main differences between conventional and high resolution spectral flow cytometry • How to achieve high resolution spectral flow cytometry • Fluorochrome options • Panel design considerations • Multicolor data examples (30 color+)
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    Multidomain Peptide Assemblies for the Design of Adaptive Supramolecular Polymers and Synthetic Vaccines

    Date:
    03
    Tuesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Pol Besenius
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Spatial and temporal control are critical properties to advance functional macro ... Read more Spatial and temporal control are critical properties to advance functional macromolecular materials in order to mimic key features of living systems. In my lecture, I will discuss our methodology in developing multicomponent supramolecular polymerization strategies in water. Using peptide-polymer conjugates we are able to address non-equilibrium states in the preparation of thermoresponsive hydrogel materials. Here, we make use of charge regulated ß–sheet selfassembly of oligopeptides and introduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsive subdomains to tune the time-domain of supramolecular polymerization. Using multicomponent assembly protocols, we currently explore the co-presentation of different epitopes and immunostimulating agents at the surface of supramolecular polymers. I will briefly discuss this modular supramolecular platform for immunotherapy applications and the development of multifunctional antitumor vaccines.
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    PRMT1 inhibition induces differentiation of colon cancer cells

    Date:
    06
    Thursday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Title: LSCF departmental seminar
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Alexander Plotnikov
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    Next Gen Immunology 2020

    Date:
    02
    Sunday
    February
    2020
    -
    05
    Wednesday
    February
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium
    Organizer: The M.D. Moross Institute for Cancer Research,Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology,The Nancy and Stephen Grand Center for Sensors and Security

    Rewiring cellular metabolism: novel insights into the role of estrogen receptor activating mutations in breast cancer

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ido Wolf
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Chemical and Biological Physics Dept Seminar

    Date:
    28
    Tuesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Title: Wide-Field Single Photon-Counting Imaging for Fast and Highly Sensitive In Vivo Cell Tracking
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Dr Rinat Ankri
    Organizer: Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Abstract: Biomolecular imaging at the preclinical stage is an essential tool in various bi ... Read more Biomolecular imaging at the preclinical stage is an essential tool in various biomedical research areas such as immunology, oncology or neurology. Among all modalities available to date, optical imaging techniques play a central role, while fluorescence, in particular in the NIR region of the spectrum, provides high sensitivity and high specificity with relatively cheap instrumentation. Several whole-body optical pre-clinical NIR imaging systems are commercially available. Instruments using continuous wave (CW or time-independent) illumination allow basic small animal imaging at low cost. However, CW techniques cannot provide fluorescence lifetime contrast, which allows to probe the microenvironment and affords an increased multiplexing power. In the first part of my talk I will introduce our single photon, time-gated, phasor-based fluorescence lifetime Imaging method which circumvents limitations of conventional techniques in speed, specificity and ease of use, using fluorescent lifetime as the main contrast mechanism. In the second part of my talk I will present the tracking and multiplexing of two different cell populations, based on their different lifetimes (following their fluorescent dyes-loading). Despite major advantages of optical based NIR imaging, the reason that NIR imagers are not clinically used, is that only very few such fluorescent molecules absorb and emit in the NIR (or in the shortwave infrared, SWIR region), and even fewer have favorable biological properties (and FDA approval). I will introduce small lung cancer and dendritic cells tracking using small polyethylene glycol/phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG–PE) micelles loaded with NIR dyes (using commercial dyes as well as dyes synthesized in Prof. Sletten’s lab, UCLA Chemistry Dept.). Micelles’ endocytosis into cells affords efficient loading and exhibits strong bio stability, enabling to track the loaded cells for several days using these formulations, even though dyes were diluted by cells division (leading to reduced dye concentration within the dividing cells). Moreover, fluorescent lifetime contrast (achieved through our time-gated imaging method), significantly improved these cells detection. These advances in NIR fluorescence based imaging open up new avenues toward NIR and SWIR imaging for biomedical applications, such as tracking and monitoring cells during immunotherapy and/or drug delivery (treatment monitoring) for various types of disease.
    Close abstract

    Regulating the regulators:

    Date:
    23
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Title: Regulation of NK cell intracellular inhibitory immune checkpoint to govern anti-tumor immunity
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Mira Barda-Saad
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    IMM Guest seminar- Dr. Ela Elyada, will lecture on "Uncovering fibroblast heterogeneity in pancreatic cancer".

    Date:
    22
    Wednesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Cancer-associated fibroblast compositions change with breast-cancer progression and correlate with clinical outcome

    Date:
    21
    Tuesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Gil Friedman
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are non-malignant tumor-supporting cells, w ... Read more Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are non-malignant tumor-supporting cells, which are highly abundant in the majority of carcinomas, and carry out distinct cancer related functions. The wide range of CAF activities suggests that CAFs are heterogenous and dynamically change. We analyzed CAFs using index and transcriptional single-cell sorting, at several time-points along breast tumor progression in mice, uncovering distinct subpopulations with transitioning transcriptional programs. We have further stained and analyzed sections of human breast tumors, and found that the two main CAF subpopulations are also present in human breast cancer, and that their ratio is associated with disease outcome
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    Guest seminar- Dr. Livnat Jerby-Arnon, will lecture on "Dissecting immune evasion mechanisms in cancer using single-cell technologies”

    Date:
    19
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Pharmacological induction of selective endoplasmic reticulum retention as a novel strategy for cancer therapy

    Date:
    16
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Boaz Tirosh
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    PhD Defense Seminar - “Phenotypic and Mechanistic Characterization of Cancer Persisters”

    Date:
    13
    Monday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Adi Jacob Berger
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    The Critical Role of Chronology in Understanding Past Climate Change: Precisely Reconstructing Holocene Climate at Mono Lake, California

    Date:
    05
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Location: Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    Lecturer: Susan R. H. Zimmerman
    Organizer: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Abstract: Recent droughts and floods in California have drawn attention to the vulnerabili ... Read more Recent droughts and floods in California have drawn attention to the vulnerability of our water-supply system to present and future climate variability. A recent analysis of climate-model simulations suggests that wet and dry conditions in California may be predictably linked to tropical and high-latitude conditions, a hypothesis that should be testable using paleoclimate records. Abundant paleoclimate evidence indicates that natural whiplash between wet and dry conditions characterized California’s climate throughout the last 4000 years, especially during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (~AD 950 to 1250), but the chronologies of the records are not precise enough to correlate to tropical and high-latitude records in order to test the model prediction. Our recent work at Mono Lake, a climatically sensitive lake on the arid eastern side of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, has focused on exploring and developing radiocarbon dating of pollen purified by flow cytometry as a tool for high-resolution dating of lake records. Our results suggest that pollen can be reliably separated and dated, but (like everything in lakes) must be interpreted within the specific geologic system where it was produced, deposited, and preserved. If pollen dating proves robust in many lake systems, it may provide the high-precision chronologies required for spatial mapping of past terrestrial climate changes.
    Close abstract

    Proteomics of Melanoma Response to Immunotherapy Reveals Dependence on Mitochondrial Metabolism

    Date:
    02
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Tamar Geiger
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Hyperactive FOXA1 Signaling in Breast Cancer Endocrine Resistance and Metastasis - When Genomics Meet Epigenomics

    Date:
    26
    Thursday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Rachel Schiff
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Special guest seminar with Moran Dvela-Levitt

    Date:
    22
    Sunday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00-13:00
    Title: “A novel mechanism and therapeutic strategy for protein-misfolding diseases”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Moran Dvela-Levitt
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Abstract: Protein homeostasis is critical for cellular function and survival. Dysregulatio ... Read more Protein homeostasis is critical for cellular function and survival. Dysregulation of the cellular protein homeostasis can lead to a build-up of misfolded proteins and facilitate the manifestation of a variety of pathological disorders including neurodegeneration, cancer and inflammation. Where and how the misfolded proteins accumulate, however, has remained a mystery. In studying MUC1 kidney disease (a rare kidney disorder), we have found that some of these pathologies may share a single, previously unrecognized cellular mechanism: a jam at a specific step in the secretory pathway involving a cargo receptor called TMED9. A small molecule called BRD4780 can break the jam and restore cells to normal function, providing a promising potential for therapeutic developments.
    Close abstract

    1st Israeli ISAC Flow Cytometry workshop

    Date:
    15
    Sunday
    December
    2019
    -
    17
    Tuesday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 00:00
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    TAM Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Signaling in Cancer: Unexpected Roles in the Tumor microenvironment

    Date:
    12
    Thursday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Tal Burstyn-Cohen
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    A new anti-cancer treatment: Insulin regulation of the cytoskeleton

    Date:
    08
    Sunday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Efrat Wertheimer MD PhD
    Organizer: Life Sciences

    A tale of two tales: a. Deconvolving cell-specific expression from bulk tumor data portrays the response to checkpoint therapy b. Uncovering the mutation selection associated with CRISPR editing

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Eytan Ruppin
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Preclinical Imaging using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Boris Epel
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging is a well-established method for t ... Read more Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging is a well-established method for the study of spatial distribution and local environment of electron paramagnetic centers and spin probes. One of the most important applications of modern EPR imaging is in vivo oximetry in which soluble spin probes with oxygen-dependent relaxation rates are used. Partial oxygen pressure (pO2) levels in tumors are major determinants of the response to cancer therapy. I will present the results of the in vivo oxygen guided radiation targeting study. This study combines pO2 images and conformal radiation delivery using 3D-printed blocks to achieve high precision treatment of tumor hypoxic areas. The study demonstrates that the dose to well-oxygenated tumor volumes in fibrosarcoma tumors in mice can be considerably reduced without compromising the outcome.
    Close abstract

    Autologous stem cells as oncolytic small pox vaccine carriers for immunotherapy of cancer in human patients

    Date:
    21
    Thursday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Aladar A. Szalay
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    From photosynthesis to clinical cancer therapy - the story

    Date:
    19
    Tuesday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Avigdor Scherz
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Hosts: Dr. Cathy Bessudo and Dr. Hadas Zehavi

    Chemical Physiology of Antibody Conjugates and Natural Products

    Date:
    19
    Tuesday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Goncalo Bernardes
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Our research uses chemistry principles to address questions of importance in lif ... Read more Our research uses chemistry principles to address questions of importance in life sciences and molecular medicine. This lecture will cover recent examples of emerging areas in our group in: (i) methods developed for site-selective chemical modification of proteins at cysteine, disulfide and lysine and their use to build stable and functional protein conjugates for in vivo applications [1–4] (ii) bioorthogonal cleavage reactions for targeted drug activation in cells [5,6] (iii) by identifying on- and off-targets for anti-cancer entities using our own machine intelligence platform, unveiling the underlying molecular mechanisms of target recognition and linking drug target binding to modulation of disease, we explore the use of natural products as selective cancer modulators [7] Recent Publications: 1. Bernardim B; Cal PMSD; Matos MJ; Oliveira BL; Martínez-Sáez N; Albuquerque IS; Corzana F; Burtoloso ACB; Jiménez-Osés G; Bernardes GJL* Stoichiometric and Irreversible Cysteine-selective Protein Modification using Carbonylacrylic Reagents. Nat. Commun. 2016, 7, 13128. 2. Martínez-Saez N; Sun S; Oldrini D; Sormanni P; Boutureira O; Carboni F; Compañón I; Deery MJ; Vendruscolo M; Corzana F; Adamo R; Bernardes GJL* Oxetane Grafts Installed Site-Selectively on Native Disulfides to Enhance Protein Stability and Activity In Vivo. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2017, 47, 14963–14967. 3. Freedy AM; Matos MJ; Omar Boutureira O; Corzana F; Guerreiro A; Somovilla VJ; Rodrigues T; Nicholls K; Xie B; Jiménez-Osés G; Brindle KM; Neves AA; Bernardes GJL* Chemoselective Installation of Amine Bonds on Proteins Through Aza-Michael Ligation. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2017, 139, 18365–18375. 4. Matos MJ; Oliveira BL; Martínez-Sáez N; Guerreiro A; Cal PMSD; Bertoldo J; Maneiro M; Perkins E; Howard J; Deery MJ; Chalker JM; Corzana F; Jiménez-Osés G; Bernardes GJL* Chemo and regioselective lysine modification on native proteins. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2018, 140, 4004–4017. 5. Stenton BJ; Oliveira BL; Matos MJ; Sinatra L; Bernardes GJL* A Thioether-directed Palladium-cleavable Linker for Targeted Bioorthogonal Drug Decaging. Chem. Sci. 2018, 9, 4185–4189. 6. Sun S; Oliveira BL; Jiménez-Osés G; Bernardes GJL* Radical-mediated thiol-ene strategy for photoactivation of thiol-containing drugs in cancer cells. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201811338. 7. Rodrigues T; Werner M; Roth J; da Cruz EHG; Marques MC; Akkapeddi P; Lobo SA; Koeberle A; Corzana F; da Silva Júnior EN; Werz O; Bernardes GJL* Machine intelligence decrypts β-lapachone as an allosteric 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. Chem. Sci. 2018, 9, 6885–7018.
    Close abstract

    The prospect of immunotherapy to combat Alzheimer's disease and dementia: the key role of the brain's choroid plexus

    Date:
    12
    Tuesday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:30
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Michal Schwartz
    Organizer: Department of Neurobiology
    Details: Host: Dr. Meital Oren meital.oren@weizmann.ac.il tel: 6479 For assistance w ... Read more Host: Dr. Meital Oren meital.oren@weizmann.ac.il tel: 6479 For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    Close details
    Abstract: The brain is no longer considered a completely autonomous tissue with respect t ... Read more The brain is no longer considered a completely autonomous tissue with respect to its immune activity. Rather, immune surveillance is required for supporting brain functional plasticity and repair. Essential immune cells include the microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, and circulating immune cells. Both the resident microglia and the circulating immune cells are under tight regulatory control to allow risk-free benefit from immunological interventions. We found that access of circulating immune cells to the brain is controlled by the brain’s epithelial barrier, the blood cerebrospinal barrier. Using immunological and immunogenomic tools, we discovered that in brain aging and under neurodegenerative conditions, this barrier does not optimally function to enable brain repair. We further showed in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), that activating the immune system by immunotherapy directed against the inhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint pathway drives an immune-dependent cascade of processes that start in the periphery and culminate with recruitment of monocyte-derived macrophages to the brain, which contribute to disease modification, reversing and slowing-down cognitive loss, reducing brain inflammation, and mitigating disease pathology in a mouse models of AD and Dementia (tauopathy). Overall, our results indicate that targeting the immune system outside the brain, rather than brain-specific disease-escalating factors within the central nervous system, can potentially provide a multi-dimensional disease-modifying therapy for AD and dementia.
    Close abstract

    4th Biannual Leukemia meeting

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-15:45
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Tzah Feldman , Prof. Michael Milevsky, Dr. Sigal Tavor, Prof. Claudia Lengerke, Prof. Shai Izraeli, Dr. Amos Tuval , Prof. Irv Weissman
    Organizer: Department of Immunology
    Details: 09:00-09:30 Get together 09:30-10:15 Dr. Tzah Feldman (Shluh’s lab) : “Recu ... Read more 09:00-09:30 Get together 09:30-10:15 Dr. Tzah Feldman (Shluh’s lab) : “Recurrent pre-leukemic deletions are the result of microhomology-mediated end joining DNA repair” 10:15-11:00 10:15-11:00 Prof. Michael Milevsky: “An ERG Enhancer-Based Reporter Identifies Leukemia Cells with Elevated Leukemogenic Potential Driven by ERG-USP9X Feed-Forward Regulation” 11:00-11:15 Coffee break 11:15-12:00 Dr. Sigal Tavor: “Gene expression predicts dasatinib response in a subset of FLT3/ ITD mutated AML.” 12:00-12:45 Prof. Claudia Lengerke: “Immune targeting of leukemia stem cells” 12:45-13:15 lunch break 13:15-14:00 Prof. Shai Izraeli: “JAK-STAT ALLs - pathogenesis and therapeutic challenges” 14:00-14:45 Dr. Amos Tuval (Shlush’s Lab): AML Ontogeny - Beyond Genomics 15:00-15:45 Prof. Irv Weissman: Normal and neoplastic stem cells
    Close details

    Mechanisms of endocrine resistance in luminal breast cancer

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Stefan Wiemann
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    The Barry Sherman Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology Seminar Series Transnational Cancer Research

    Date:
    31
    Thursday
    October
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Converging Cancer Genetics, Structural Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Daniel Rauh
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: The Barry Sherman Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology Seminar Series

    Seminar for thesis defense Naama Dekel

    Date:
    30
    Wednesday
    October
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Title: System level study of the cell death functional signature in metastatic melanoma cell lines
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Naama Dekel
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof.Mark Dawson will lecture on "Targeting the Epigenome in Cancer."

    Date:
    24
    Tuesday
    September
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof.Mark Dawson
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    The mitochondrial protein VDAC1 as a new target: From concepts to cancer therapy

    Date:
    12
    Thursday
    September
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Varda Shoshan-Barmatz
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    CNIO - MICC Joint Conference on Cancer Research

    Date:
    03
    Tuesday
    September
    2019
    -
    05
    Thursday
    September
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Moross Integrated Cancer Center (MICC)

    Arrestin in Genitourinary Cancers

    Date:
    15
    Thursday
    August
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Yehia Daaka
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    A New tool box – new paths in melanoma

    Date:
    01
    Thursday
    August
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ze'ev Ronai
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    A Moving Target: Tracking Cancer Plasticity in Cells and in Patients

    Date:
    25
    Thursday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Amir Goldkorn
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Trio correlation between cell mechanics, phagocytic capacity, and cancer aggressiveness

    Date:
    14
    Sunday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ofra Benny
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: A comprehensive study showing a trio correlation between cell mechanics, phagocy ... Read more A comprehensive study showing a trio correlation between cell mechanics, phagocytic capacity, and cancer aggressiveness is presented. Mechanical properties of particles are shown to have a critical effect on the interactions with malignant cancer cells. Our findings offers new directions for mechanical based specificity in cancer treatment, and could lead to uptake measurement as a diagnostic tools for precision medicine.
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    PhD Defense Seminar - Characterization of immunotherapy targets in melanoma

    Date:
    09
    Tuesday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Shelly Kalaora
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof. Ofer Mandelboim will lecture on "TIGIT and its cellular and bacterial ligands: novel checkpoints for cancer immune therapy."

    Date:
    24
    Monday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Ofer Mandelboim
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Single and multi-frequency saturation methods for molecular and microstructural contrast in human MRI”

    Date:
    20
    Thursday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Elena Vinogradov
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides excellent quality images of soft tissu ... Read more Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides excellent quality images of soft tissues and is an established modality for diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of various diseases. Majority of MRI scans in clinical practice today report on anatomy, morphology and sometimes physiology. The new area of active studies is aimed at developing MRI contrast methods for the detection of the events at the microstructural and molecular level employing endogenous properties. Here, we will discuss methods that employ single- and multi-frequency saturation to detect events on microstructural and molecular level. First, we will describe principles and translational aspects of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer1(CEST). CEST employs selective saturation of the exchanging protons and subsequent detection of the water signal decrease to create images that are weighted by the presence of a metabolite or pH2. We will describe aspects of translating CEST to reliable clinical applications and discuss its potential uses in human oncology, specifically breast cancer. Second, we will describe a method called inhomogeneous Magnetization Transfer3 (ihMT), which employs dual-frequency saturation to create contrast originating from the residual dipolar couplings and thus specific to microstructure. We will focus on the application of ihMT to the detection of myelin in brain and spinal cord. Finally, we will discuss a novel exchange-sensitive method based on the balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence as an alternative way for chemical exchange detection (bSSFPX4). Using an effective field description, similarities between bSSFP and CW application can be explored and utilized for in-vivo MRI contrast. [1] K. Ward, et.al., JMR,143,79-87 (2000). [2] J. Zhou, et.al., Nature Medicine, 9,1085-1090 (2003). [3] G. Varma, et.al., MRM, 73, 614-622 (2015). [4] S. Zhang, et.al., JMR, 275, 55-67 (2017).
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    RNASEQ Predicts Major Breast Cancer Subtype and Potential to Respond to Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Date:
    18
    Tuesday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Daniel Harari
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Breast cancer (BC) divides into three major subtypes. 1) Estrogen/Progesterone ... Read more Breast cancer (BC) divides into three major subtypes. 1) Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor positive (ER+ve), 2) ErbB2/Her2 genome amplified (Her2+), and for cancers exhibiting none of these markers, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). These classifications defined by histo-pathologists have important ramifications as they indicate alternative therapy options best suited to treat a given patient. We have used high throughput transcriptomic data from > 1000 breast cancer biopsies derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and demonstrate that RNASEQ can with high fidelity subcategorize BC into one of these three major subgroups. Surprisingly, we found that three levels of ErbB2 expression ErbBLOW, ErbB2MED and ErbB2HIGH closely correlate with TNBC, ER+ and HER+ tumor subtypes respectively, a finding not paralleled by genome copy-number alone. Pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes demonstrated that TNBCs are particularly enriched for “Lymphocyte Activation” correlating with “chemotaxis”, “NK-cell activation” and “IFN-gamma signaling”. These immune-related gene signatures may provide an additional layer of clinically-relevant patient information as others have reported that T-cell infiltration into tumors indicate potential good response to cancer immunotherapy (e.g. Anti-PD1, Anti-CTLA4 drugs). We can use these transcriptomic immune signatures to determine their level of expression in individual patients, thus providing context for predicting response to immunotherapy in personalized medicinal manner.
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    SERGIO LOMBROSO AWARD IN CANCER RESEARCH CEREMONY AND SYMPOSIUM

    Date:
    17
    Monday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-12:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology
    Details: 09:00 Gathering 09:30 Sergio Lombroso Award in Cancer Research ceremony In the ... Read more 09:00 Gathering 09:30 Sergio Lombroso Award in Cancer Research ceremony In the presence of the Lombroso family 2018 Recipient - Prof. Benny Geiger Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 2019 Recipient - Prof. Karen Vousden Francis Crick Institute, London 09:45 Prof. Karen Vousden Francis Crick Institute, London “Playing with fire: the complex roles of p53 in the control of tumour development” 10:30 Coffee Break 10:50 Prof. Benny Geiger Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot “The mechanisms underlying invasive migration of metastatic cancer cells” 11:20 Dr. Ayelet Erez Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot "Modulating amino acid metabolism in cancer for immunotherapy" 11:50 Dr. Ravid Straussman Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot “The tumor microbiome”
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    SERGIO LOMBROSO AWARD IN CANCER RESEARCH CEREMONY AND SYMPOSIUM

    Date:
    17
    Monday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Life Sciences

    Nano-Ghosts: Harnessing the power of stem cells to modulate the tumor niche

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Marcelle Machluf
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Cancer Prevention Research: Looking to the Future

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    June
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:30-16:30
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: The M.D. Moross Institute for Cancer Research

    Dysregulation of alternative splicing in cancer and its modulation as therapy

    Date:
    06
    Thursday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Rotem Karni
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    FAK Family Kinases: The Yin and Yang of Cancer Metastasis

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Hava Gil
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Chemical and Biological Physics Guest Seminar

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Title: Mechanics of cells and tissues
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Alexandre Kabla
    Organizer: Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Abstract: Cell migration and cell mechanics play a crucial role in a number of key biologi ... Read more Cell migration and cell mechanics play a crucial role in a number of key biological processes, such as embryo development or cancer metastasis. Understanding the way cells control their own material properties and mechanically interact with their environment is key. At a more fundamental level, there is need better measure, describe and monitor cell and tissue mechanics before we can formulate testable hypotheses. In this talk, I will report experimental studies on the mechanical response of two different multicellular structures: epithelial monolayers and early embryonic tissues. In both cases, the material exhibits a strong time-dependent response over a broad distribution of time-scales. The combination of mechanical characterisation with biological perturbations offers new insight into the mechanisms exploited by cells and tissue to control their mechanical properties. This insight is however limited by the lack of consistency in experimental protocols and modelling strategies used in the field. We recently developed a systematic approach to capture material properties from mechanical behaviours and made progress assessing the model’s generality over a broad range of biological systems
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    Stress and inflammation in tumor progression and metastasis

    Date:
    13
    Monday
    May
    2019
    -
    15
    Wednesday
    May
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 12:00 - 17:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Deconstructing and reconstructing the ovarian cancer microenvironment

    Date:
    13
    Monday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Frances Balkwill
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    UVB-Induced Tumor Heterogeneity Directs Immune Response in Melanoma

    Date:
    02
    Thursday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: CANCER RESEARCH CLUB
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Yardena Samuels
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Modulation of T-cell activity by the human T-cell leukemia virus fusion peptide

    Date:
    30
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Eita Rotem
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: In order to infect and persist in their hosts, viruses utilize multiple strategi ... Read more In order to infect and persist in their hosts, viruses utilize multiple strategies to evade the immune system. HIV utilizes membrane interacting regions of its envelope protein, primarily used to fuse with its target cells, to inhibit T-cell activation. Yet, it is unknown whether this ability is shared with other viruses. We examined the T-cell inhibitory activity of HTLV-1, focusing on a functionally conserved region of HTLV’s and HIV’s fusion proteins, the fusion peptide (FP). Here, we reveal that HTLV’s FP modulates T-cell activity in-vitro and in-vivo. This modulation is characterized by downregulation of the Th1-response, leading to an elevated Th2-response observed by transition in mRNA, cytokines and regulatory proteins. Our findings suggest that FP mediated immune evasion might be a trait shared between different viruses.
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    CRASH COURSE ON GENOMICS and BIOINFORMATICS OF CANCER

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:45-14:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Eytan Ruppin, Prof. Itay Tirosh
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences

    Precision Oncology: How precise is it and what's next?

    Date:
    17
    Wednesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Sofia Merajver
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Imm Special Guest Seminar:Prof. Jo Van Ginderachter, will lecture on "Macrophages in the healthy and the tumor-bearing brain: linking single-cell transcriptomics to function."

    Date:
    16
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Jo Van Ginderachter
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Mechanisms of longevity and cancer-resistance: lessons from long-lived animals

    Date:
    14
    Sunday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Vera Gorbunova & Prof. Andrei Seluanov
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Avraham Levy

    Applying cancer unique metabolism for patients’ diagnosis and therapy

    Date:
    11
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Ayelet Erez
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    NK cells in Cancer: The next Breakthrough?

    Date:
    07
    Sunday
    April
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research

    Considering alternatives to targeted therapy of cancer

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Yinon Ben-Neriah
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    LSCF special Flow Cytometry Seminar

    Date:
    02
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-13:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    1st Israeli Flow Cytometry Meeting

    Date:
    31
    Sunday
    March
    2019
    -
    01
    Monday
    April
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    1st Israeli Flow Cytometry Conference

    Date:
    31
    Sunday
    March
    2019
    -
    01
    Monday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 00:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    Mapping the Breakome of Cancer Cells: What Lessons have we Learned?

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Rami Aqeilan
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Kaluza – flow cytometry analysis software

    Date:
    26
    Tuesday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:15-13:15
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Shlomit Rak-Yahalom Rhenium
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Details: 10:15-11:15 - Kaluza introduction and features 11:15-12:15 - FCS data analysis ... Read more 10:15-11:15 - Kaluza introduction and features 11:15-12:15 - FCS data analysis demonstration 12:15-13:15 - Personal fcs data analysis
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    IMM Guest seminar- Prof.Yuval Shaked will lecture on "Therapy-induced a phenotype and functional switch in cells at the tumor microenvironment in response to therapy dictates tumor fate.""

    Date:
    25
    Monday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Yuval Shaked
    Organizer: Department of Immunology
    Details: Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surg ... Read more Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular effects which, in turn, lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host effects is attributed to pro-inflammation, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumor and seeding at metastatic sites. Various bone marrow derived cells participate in this process, and many different factors are secreted from host cells in response to the therapy which then lead to tumor relapse and even resistance to therapy. The recent advances in cancer immunotherapy have significantly improved therapeutic outcomes in a subset of patients with advanced malignancies, still most patients do not respond to treatment and some even hyper progress. In my presentation, I will discuss several examples of how host cells undergo a functional and phenotype switch in response to therapy which contribute to tumor relapse and hyperprogression in response to therapy. I will also demonstrate how blocking the host pro-tumorigenic responses to therapy can minimize therapy resistance and improve therapy outcome.
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    Exosomal transmission between macrophages and cancer cells: new insights to sroma-mediated drug resistance

    Date:
    21
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ziv Gil
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    “LAP and LANDO: Noncanonical functions of autophagy proteins in anti-cancer immunity and Alzheimer's Disease”

    Date:
    18
    Monday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Douglas R. Green
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Vav1: A Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde protein--good for the hematopoietic system, bad for cancer

    Date:
    14
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Shulamit Katzav-Shapira
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Designing precision nanomedicines to diagnose, excise and treat melanoma brain metastases in three dimensions

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    EMERGING CONCEPTS IN BREAST CANCER

    Date:
    03
    Sunday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-14:00
    Title: Minerva and Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research workshop
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Sima Lev, Prof. Stefan Wiemann, Prof. Carlos Caldas
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Shaping the Inflammatory Niche: Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Facilitate Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Date:
    21
    Thursday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Neta Erez
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    UV protection-timer and UV systemic effect

    Date:
    14
    Thursday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Carmit Levy
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    eIF1A promotes translation of cell cycle genes

    Date:
    12
    Tuesday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Urmila Sehrawat
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Protein synthesis is linked to cell proliferation and its deregulation contribut ... Read more Protein synthesis is linked to cell proliferation and its deregulation contributes to diseases such as cancer. eIF1A plays a key role in scanning and AUG selection and differentially affects translation of distinct mRNAs. Its unstructured N-terminal tail (NTT) is frequently mutated in several malignancies. Here, we show that eIF1A is essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression. Ribosome-profiling of eIF1A knockdown cells revealed a substantial reduction in protein synthesis, with particular enrichment of cell-cycle mRNAs. The downregulated genes are predominantly characterized by lengthy 5’UTR. On the other hand, eIF1A depletion caused a broad stimulation of initiation in 5’UTRs at near-cognate AUG. Importantly, cancer-associated eIF1A-NTT mutants augment the positive effect of eIF1A on long 5’UTR while hardly affecting AUG selection. Our findings suggest that reduced binding of eIF1A NTT mutants to the ribosome retains its open state and facilitate scanning of long 5’UTR-containing cell cycle genes.
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    Frustrations in the treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Uziel Beller
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Gain Fat - Lose Metastasis: From cancer cell plasticity to differentiation theraphy

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Dana Ishay Ronen
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Joel S. Bader

    Date:
    23
    Wednesday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Title: “Identifying drivers of breast cancer metastasis”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Joel S. Bader
    Organizer: The Kahn Family Research Center for Systems Biology of the Human Cell
    Abstract: Most breast cancer deaths are from metastasis, rather than growth of the primary ... Read more Most breast cancer deaths are from metastasis, rather than growth of the primary tumor. Therapies for reducing deaths from metastatic cancer are limited, in part because much of the basic biology of metastasis remains unknown. We are developing and applying methods to identify these basic mechanisms. We describe work with experimental and clinical partners using organoids, clusters of 300-500 primary mammary cells, to interrogate metastasis-related phenotypes. We present new mathematical image processing methods that convert organoid images into quantitative invasion phenotypes. We then discuss genes and pathways whose activities lead to invasion, dissemination, and metastasis. Often the driver and effector genes are poor candidates for therapeutic intervention, but signaling intermediates can be targeted. We are prioritizing intermediates using new methods that characterize the density of paths through a biological network. We are recruiting women with breast cancer to participate in these studies as part of our US NCI Cancer Target Discovery & Development (CTD2) Center.
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    IMM Guest seminar-Prof. Yoram Reiter will lecture on "Engineering Immune Effector Molecules and Cells for Immunotherapy of Cancer and Autoimmunity."

    Date:
    21
    Monday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Yoram Reiter
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof. Yinon Ben-Neriah will lecture on "Targeting the transcriptional addiction of leukemia cells"

    Date:
    14
    Monday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Yinon Ben-Neriah
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof. Tal Burstyn-Cohen will lecture on "Myeloid-derived PROS1 Inhibits Tumor Metastasis by Curbing Inflammation."

    Date:
    07
    Monday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Tal Burstyn-Cohen
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    3rd Bi Annual Leukemia Meeting- Sunday January 6th at 09:00.

    Date:
    06
    Sunday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-13:30
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Department of Immunology
    Details: 0900-09:30 Get together 09:30-10:00 Dr. Jonathan Cnaanai: “Clinical and molec ... Read more 0900-09:30 Get together 09:30-10:00 Dr. Jonathan Cnaanai: “Clinical and molecular determinants of response to salvage chemotherapy in AML patients“ 10:00-10:45 Prof. Eyal Gottlieb: “targeting metabolic traits of leukemic stem cell” 10:45-11:30 Sara Isabel-Fernandes: ”Adaptations in lipid metabolism is required for the survival of leukemic cells in the CNS”. 11:30-12:30 Break. 12:30-13:30 Prof. Gidi Rechavi group: “Epitranscriptomic regulation of gene expression in normal hematopoiesis and leukemia.”
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