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Immunology and Regenerative Biology Colloquium

Date:
15
Thursday
September
2022
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 11:00-12:00
Title: Stem Cells: Coping with Stress
Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
Lecturer: Prof. Elaine Fuchs
Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology
Abstract: Using mammalian skin as a model, Prof. Elaine Fuchs studies the remarkable prope ... Read more Using mammalian skin as a model, Prof. Elaine Fuchs studies the remarkable properties of tissue stem cells to replenish dying cells and repair wounds, and how the cells know which tasks to perform and when. She explores how stem cells sense and communicate with other cells in their environment. Aiming at advancing therapeutics, she dissects how communication networks malfunction in inflammation, aging, and cancers.
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    Past

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    Zoom PhD Thesis Defense - Saptaparna Mukherjee

    Date:
    01
    Monday
    August
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00-14:00
    Title: Understanding the Impact of p53 Mutations by Interrogating its Protein Interacting Network
    Lecturer: Saptaparna Mukherjee (Prof. Moshe Oren Lab)
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology
    Details: Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98889132347?pwd=Wnd3SlBGRk1IZXV0SFBwT1Fh ... Read more Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98889132347?pwd=Wnd3SlBGRk1IZXV0SFBwT1FhY1Zkdz09 Meeting ID: 988 8913 2347 Password: 071647
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    Single-molecule and single-cell epigenetics: Decoding the epigenome for cancer research and diagnostics

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    July
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Efrat Shema
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Next-generation transcriptomics-based precision oncology

    Date:
    25
    Monday
    July
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Eytan Ruppin
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Special guest semianr with Dr. Asaf Zviran

    Date:
    17
    Sunday
    July
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Ultra-sensitive detection and monitoring of solid cancers using whole-genome mutation integration
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Asaf Zviran
    Organizer: Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology
    Abstract: Early detection of recurrence and monitoring of Molecular Residual Disease (MRD) ... Read more Early detection of recurrence and monitoring of Molecular Residual Disease (MRD) post-surgery is critical for clinical decision-making to tailor personalized treatments across solid cancers. C2i Genomics has developed an ultra-sensitive whole-genome ctDNA test, allowing extremely accurate and sensitive monitoring of patients with solid tumors. Here we present results from applying whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and identification of ctDNA across a variety of adult and pediatric solid tumors. We integrate a genome-wide mutation and copy number monitoring approach coupled with advanced signal processing and Artificial Intelligence (AI) for measuring the tumor load from low-input blood samples (~1mL of plasma) with ultra-sensitive detection. The increased sensitivity allowed clinical detection of tumor fraction down to 5*10-5 and recurrence detection sensitivity achieving >65% at the first two months after definitive treatment, enabling earlier clinical intervention for high-risk patients.
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    The Tumor Ecosystem – Evolution of a Concept

    Date:
    14
    Thursday
    July
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Isaac P. Witz
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Cellular Plasticity in Cancer

    Date:
    05
    Tuesday
    July
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Dana Pe’er
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    What you always wanted to know about nanoparticles, proteins and biomaterials, but never dared to ask

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    June
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Klaus D. Jandt
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: This lecture presents an overview on major research work of the Fellow’s group ... Read more This lecture presents an overview on major research work of the Fellow’s group in the areas of polymer nanoparticles for drug delivery, control of protein adsorption on materials surfaces and protein nanofibers. In addition, the new excellence graduate school (Research Training Group) RTG 2723: Materials‐Microbe‐Microenvironments: Antimicrobial biomaterials with tailored structures and properties (M‐M‐M) funded by the German Science Foundation will be introduced. Polymer nanoparticles (PNP) became recently exceedingly popular through novel vaccination technologies but have also major potential for fighting inflammation and cancer. These drug release properties of the PNP depend on their structure. Yet, the literature reports little about the structure and the properties of most PNPs, except the chemical composition. The PNP’s crystallinity, thermal and mechanical properties are frequently ignored, even though they may play a key role in the drug delivery properties of the PNPs. Protein adsorption on biomaterials is the first process after implantation and determines much of the fate of the biomaterial, such as cell adhesion, blood coagulation or infection at the implant site. Despite decades of research, only rules of thumb exist to predict protein adsorption behavior. We present nanotechnological approaches to control protein adsorption using nanostructured semicrystalline polymers and crystal facets of TiO2. Selfassembled protein nanofibers consisting of one or more proteins, potentially allow to tailor the properties of biomaterials interfaces and to create bone mimetic structures. Finally, the new DFG‐RTG 2723: Materials‐Microbe‐Microenvironments: Antimicrobial biomaterials with tailored structures and properties (M‐M‐M) in Jena will be introduced. The aim of the RTG is to provide excellent training for approximately 40 international doctoral researchers in antimicrobial biomaterials in interdisciplinary tandem projects, connecting materials science and medical science. The RTG pursues a new strategy by developing antibiotic free biomaterials, where the antimicrobial action is based mainly on physical principles. The new RTG offers ample opportunity for fruitful cooperation and exchange with leading research institutions in Israel.
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    Mechanisms driving genome catastrophes in cancer

    Date:
    22
    Wednesday
    June
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ofer Shoshani
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Mechanisms of cancer protection in congenital IGF1 deficiencies

    Date:
    09
    Thursday
    June
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Haim Werner
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Therapies targeting EGFR and PD-L1 in lung cancer

    Date:
    09
    Thursday
    June
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Yosef Yarden
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Details: Host: Dr. Orith Leitner, Antibody unit

    On discovery and sensitivity in (photo)catalysis

    Date:
    07
    Tuesday
    June
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Frank Glorius
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Catalysis is a key technology, since it allows for increased levels of selectivi ... Read more Catalysis is a key technology, since it allows for increased levels of selectivity and efficacy of chemical transformations. While significant progress can be made by rational design or engineered step-by-step improvements, many pressing challenges in the field require the discovery of new and formerly unexpected results. Arguably, the question “How to discover?” is at the heart of the scientific process. In this talk, (smart) screening strategies for accelerated discovery and improved reproducibility will be presented, together with new photocatalytic transformations. In addition, two other exciting areas will be addressed: N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) are powerful ligands in catalysis due to their strong electron-donating properties and their ability to form very stable bonds to transition metals. In addition, they can stabilize and modify nanoparticles or flat metals surfaces, outperforming established phosphine or thiol ligands regarding structural flexibility, electron-donating properties and stability. Current research is highly interdisciplinary and focusses on the basic understanding of the binding mode, mobility and the elucidation of the impact on the surface properties. Exciting applications in materials science, heterogeneous catalysts and beyond are within reach. Biological membranes and their constituents are some of the most important and fundamental building blocks of life. However, their exact role in many essential cellular processes as well as in the development of diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer's is still not very well understood. Thus, we design, synthesize and evaluate imidazolium-based lipid analogs that can integrate into biological membranes and can be used as probes for live cell imaging or to manipulate membranes.
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    Metabolism, diet, and cancer

    Date:
    31
    Tuesday
    May
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Joshua Rabinowitz, MD, PhD
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Targeting metabolic vulnerabilities in cancer

    Date:
    26
    Thursday
    May
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Tomer Shlomi
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    BRD4 in Transcription Programming and Cancer Therapy

    Date:
    26
    Thursday
    May
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-11:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Cheng-Ming Chiang
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an epigenetic regulator and transcrip ... Read more Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) is an epigenetic regulator and transcription cofactor whose phosphorylation by casein kinase II (CK2) and dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) modulates its function in gene-specific targeting and recruitment of transcriptional regulators and chromatin modifiers. BRD4 has emerged as an important cancer therapeutic target due to widely available small compound inhibitors, such as JQ1 and I-BET, targeting the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family members. Besides transcriptional regulation, BRD4 also plays crucial roles in regulating diverse cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, DNA damage response, chromatin structure maintenance, stem cell reprogramming, cell lineage differentiation, and viral latency and reactivation. While BET inhibitors and degraders show promising anticancer effects, issues related to drug resistance upon prolonged treatment remain a challenge in BET-targeted therapeutics development. Recently, we identified specific small compound inhibitors targeting phosphorylation-dependent BRD4 interaction with distinct transcription/replication components and DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including p53, c-Myc, AP-1, and cancer-associated human papillomavirus E2 proteins. Some of these compounds effectively block cancer cell growth and migration and specifically inhibit p53 interaction with BRD4. These new types of protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors highlight molecular action distinct from the widely used BET bromodomain inhibitors.
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    18th International p53 Workshop

    Date:
    22
    Sunday
    May
    2022
    -
    26
    Thursday
    May
    2022
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium

    Killing Cancer Stem Cells

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Jeremy Rich, MD, MHS, MBA
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Killing Cancer Stem Cells

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Jeremy N. Rich, MD, MHS, MBA
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Insights on hypermutation in cancer initiation and response to immunotherapy. Lessons from a rare cancer syndrome

    Date:
    10
    Sunday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Uri Tabori
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    The microbiome as part of the tumor ecosystem

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ravid Straussman and Lian Narunsky Haziza
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Tissue level insights from cellular measurements – Identifying multi-cellular hubs in colorectal cancer

    Date:
    06
    Wednesday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Matan Hofree
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Tissue level insights from cellular measurements – Identifying multi-cellular hubs in colorectal cancer

    Date:
    06
    Wednesday
    April
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 00:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Matan Hofree
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    From Basic Cancer Research to Innovative Therapies

    Date:
    28
    Monday
    March
    2022
    -
    30
    Wednesday
    March
    2022
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium

    PhD defense seminar by Lian Narunsky Haziza (Ravid Straussman lab)

    Date:
    21
    Monday
    March
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:30
    Title: Pan-cancer analyses of the tumor mycobiome and its clinical effects
    Lecturer: Lian Narunsky Haziza
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology
    Details:

    Canceled ! - The microbiome as part of the tumor ecosystem

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    March
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ravid Straussman and Lian Narunsky Haziza
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZ ... Read more Meeting URL: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
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    Tumor ecosystems- from prediction to modelling.

    Date:
    15
    Tuesday
    February
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Carlos Caldas
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Skin stem cells in tissue regeneration and tumor formation

    Date:
    03
    Thursday
    February
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Yaron Fuchs
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Cancer is a disease of epigenetic stochasticity

    Date:
    27
    Thursday
    January
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Andrew(Andy) Feinberg
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Current Technologies in Cell Analysis and Sorting by Flow Cytometry

    Date:
    06
    Thursday
    January
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Location: ZOOM
    Lecturer: Dr. Ekaterina Kopitman
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    PhD Thesis Defense - The non-cell autonomous roles of TAZ and YAP in breast cancer

    Date:
    02
    Sunday
    January
    2022
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-11:00
    Location: Ullmann Building of Life Sciences
    Lecturer: Anat Gershoni (Moshe Oren Lab)
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Dissecting tumor heterogeneity in glioma

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    December
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Itay Tirosh
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    At the crossroads of science, engineering, and medicine: Improving cancer diagnosis

    Date:
    23
    Thursday
    December
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Yonina Eldar & Keren Peri-Hanania, MD
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    From cell circuits to collective cell behaviour

    Date:
    20
    Monday
    December
    2021
    Colloquium
    Time: 11:00-12:15
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Leah Edelstein-Keshet
    Organizer: Faculty of Chemistry
    Abstract: In order for our body to heal and repair injury, cell sheets must move together ... Read more In order for our body to heal and repair injury, cell sheets must move together to seal a gap. To overcome infection, white blood cells need to track down and destroy pathogens. Such processes can only work if cells can "sense" their environment and "decide" to move in the right direction, or else, to coordinate with neighbouring cells. This requires tight control of adhesion between cells, as well as the speed and direction of cell migration. In this talk, I will describe mathematical and computational research on cell migration, both in normal and abnormal (cancer) cells. I will focus mainly on recent "multi-scale" modeling, where we combine our understanding of the "molecular machinery" inside cells, with information about how cells interact with one another. We use this approach to investigate the behaviour of groups of cells. Combining mathematics and computational methods, we can get some insights on cell organization in development and in wound healing, as well as what could go wrong in disease such as cancer.
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    Antibody-mediated immune responses in ovarian cancer patients

    Date:
    09
    Thursday
    December
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ziv Shulman
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    The epigenetic landscape of cancer-associated fibroblasts

    Date:
    30
    Tuesday
    November
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Coral Halperin
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Cancer cells recruit and rewire normal cells in their microenvironment to suppor ... Read more Cancer cells recruit and rewire normal cells in their microenvironment to support and protect them by creating a pro-tumorigenic tumor microenvironment (TME). We lack an overarching view of how, despite being genomically stable, stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment are heterogeneously reprogrammed across time and space to promote the evolution of aggressive disease. Recent work by us and others has shown that fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment are transcriptionally rewired to become protumorigenic cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Here we hypothesize that CAFs are epigenetically modified and that these modifications lead to deregulation of signaling pathways and transcriptional circuitries that support tumorigenic growth in the neoplastic cells. We applied a sensitive method of whole genome bisulfide sequencing on a model of triple-negative breast cancer in mice to evaluate the methylome profile of CAFs compared to normal mammary fibroblasts (NMFs). We detected global changes in DNA methylation as well as distinct changes in promoter methylation between NMFs and breast CAFs in mice. These changes inversely correlated with transcriptional changes between CAFs and NMFs. We characterized potential regulators of this process, and tested their expression in CAFs in human breast cancer patients, to confirm relevance of our findings to human disease. Our findings suggest that epigenetic alterations contribute to the transcriptional rewiring of fibroblasts to CAFs. This work presents a comprehensive map of DNA-methylation in CAFs, and reveals a previously unknown facet of the dynamic plasticity of the stroma.
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    Melanoma addiction to GCDH defines NRF2 tumor suppressor function

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    November
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ze’ev Ronai
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Order from Chaos: Chromosome Catastrophes Drive Cancer Evolution

    Date:
    02
    Tuesday
    November
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Ofer Shoshani
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Chromosomal instability is one of the major hallmarks in cancer driving numerica ... Read more Chromosomal instability is one of the major hallmarks in cancer driving numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Cancer cells can use the chaotic background of chromosome instability to generate ordered genomic events leading to accelerated tumor formation or drug resistance. I will show how chromothripsis, the catastrophic shattering of a chromosome and random religation of its pieces, can promote resistance to therapy. Using cancer cells and patient samples, I identified that chromothripsis drives the formation and evolution of extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA) elements that can amplify genes conferring drug resistance. I will then discuss how transient centrosome amplification can induce a burst of chromosomal instability in vivo. This triggers the formation of random aneuploidies (changes in chromosome numbers) with cancer initiating cells carrying a specific aneuploidy signature leading to accelerated tumorigenesis. This work has uncovered aneuploidy as a direct driver of cancer and enables a better understanding of the involvement of specific aneuploidies in cancer.
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    Modeling and targeting cancer aneuploidy

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    October
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Uri Ben-David
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    SCANnTREAT: photodynamic therapy triggered by spectral scanner CT: an new tool for cancer treatment?

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    September
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Philippe DOUEK
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Special seminar with Dr. Yaara Oren

    Date:
    16
    Monday
    August
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Title: Beyond Darwin: understanding cancer persister cells
    Lecturer: Dr. Yaara Oren
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Details: zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96160519106?pwd=ZSs0NXd0WWZSaTBQTTRxSkZ5dmRvdz09
    Abstract: Despite favorable initial response to therapy, a third of cancer patients will d ... Read more Despite favorable initial response to therapy, a third of cancer patients will develop recurrent disease and succumb to it within five years of diagnosis. While there has been much progress in characterizing the pathways that contribute to stable genetic drug resistance, the mechanisms underlying early reversible resistance, also known as persisters-driven resistance, remain largely unknown. It has long been believed that persisters represent a subset of cells that happen to be non-proliferating at the time of treatment, and therefore can survive drugs that preferentially kill rapidly proliferating cells. However, in my talk I will describe a rare persister population which, despite not harboring any resistance-conferring mutation, can maintain proliferative capacity in the presence of drug. To study this rare, transiently-resistant, cycling persister population, we developed Watermelon, a high-complexity expressed barcode lentiviral library for simultaneous tracing of each cell’s clonal origin and proliferative and transcriptional states. We combine single cell transcriptomics with imaging and metabolomics to show that cycling and non-cycling persisters arise from different cell lineages with distinct transcriptional and metabolic programs. Finally, I will describe how by studying persister cells we can gain critical insights on cellular memory, fate, and evolution, which can guide the development of better anti-cancer treatments.
    Close abstract

    Imm Guest Seminar: Dr. Yael David will lecture on " Uncovering Cancer-Associated Epigenetic Events Using Novel Chemical Tools."

    Date:
    22
    Thursday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Yael David
    Organizer: Department of Systems Immunology
    Details: Light refreshments will be served at 10:40.

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    12
    Monday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:30
    Title: Beyond Darwin: understanding cancer persister cells
    Lecturer: Dr. Yaara Oren
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97339959821?pwd=QkloVEFNVGMwWjlzMWRrSTQyMUZhQT09

    Love the neighbor – Unraveling the tumor microenvironment using multiplexed imaging

    Date:
    08
    Thursday
    July
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Leeat Keren
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Single Cell Atlases as Roadmaps in Pediatric Cancer

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00-17:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Aviv Regev
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    The success and challenges of introducing PARP inhibitors into the therapy of ovarian cancer- a clinician’s perspective

    Date:
    17
    Thursday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Jonathan A Ledermann BSc MD FRCP FMedSci
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    GOING TO EXTREMES: STUDIES WITH RARE EXCEPTIONAL SURVIVORS OF OVARIAN CANCER.

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    June
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Lecturer: Prof. David Bowtell
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    New Experimental Methods in Cancer Research - Workshop

    Date:
    31
    Monday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 08:00-17:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Breast tumor evolution

    Date:
    26
    Wednesday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Kornelia Polyak
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    The two faces of NF-ĸB – the ‘canonical’ tumor promoter and the ‘non-canonical’ tumor suppressor

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Aaron Ciechanover
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Clinical development of mRNA vaccines and therapeutics: COVID and beyond

    Date:
    09
    Sunday
    May
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:15-10:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium
    Lecturer: Dr. Tal Zaks
    Details: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/94905298503
    Abstract: mRNA based vaccines prevent COVID-19 infections, putting them at the forefront o ... Read more mRNA based vaccines prevent COVID-19 infections, putting them at the forefront of the current global fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. The scientific and clinical development of mRNA medicines, which began in ernest only ~10 years ago, has the potential to not only change the landscape of infectious disease vaccines but to also impact the treatment of cancer, genetic metabolic, autoimmune, and cardiovascular diseases. This talk will review the translational medicine approach to the research and development of both infectious disease vaccines, as exemplified by COVID-19 vaccine Moderna, as well as other applications of mRNA medicines currently in clinical development. ᐧ
    Close abstract

    Heat Shock Factor 1-dependent extracellular matrix remodeling mediates the transition from chronic intestinal inflammation to colon cancer

    Date:
    27
    Tuesday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Oshrat Galibov-Levi
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: In the colon, long-term exposure to chronic inflammation drives colitis-associat ... Read more In the colon, long-term exposure to chronic inflammation drives colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). However, molecular understanding of how this occurs is still lacking. Within the tumor, cancer cells are surrounded by a variety of non-malignant cells and by the extracellular matrix (ECM), which together compose the tumor microenvironment (TME), which is essential for tumor homeostasis and progression. While the cancer cells are highly mutated, the stromal cells are genomically stable. Master regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) was shown to play an important part in the transcriptional reprogramming of the TME. By using proteomic and advanced methods of microscopy and image analysis we show that HSF1-dependent ECM remodeling plays a crucial role in mediating inflammation-driven colon cancer. /j/95881429481?pwd=VkxwUmg1Z2ErZmhpZDJqMTZwellGZz09
    Close abstract

    Therapeutic Exploitation of Metabolic Vulnerabilities of Cancer

    Date:
    22
    Thursday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Eyal Gottlieb
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Inactivation of DNA repair and high dose Vitamin C boost cancer immunotherapy

    Date:
    08
    Thursday
    April
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Alberto Bardelli
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    VEGF/vascular-centered view of the tumor microenvironment and aging

    Date:
    25
    Thursday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Eli Keshet
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Inflammation, Metabolism and Immunity in Liver Cancer: From Pathogenesis to Treatment

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    March
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Lecturer: Dr. Michael Karin
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Proteasome profiling meets precision oncology

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    February
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Lecturer: Dr. Yifat Merbl
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Targeted protein degradation for the treatment of cancer

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    February
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Benjamin Ebert, MD, PhD
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Studying resistance in cancer

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Getz Gad
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Quantitative Prediction of Nanoparticle Assembly for Personalized Nanomedicine

    Date:
    17
    Sunday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Yosi Shamay
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92447973616?pwd=UWJkRWdraGFVQjdPb3ByWis1b ... Read more Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/92447973616?pwd=UWJkRWdraGFVQjdPb3ByWis1bDk2Zz09 Development of targeted nanoparticle for personalized cancer therapeutics often requires complex synthetic schemes involving both supramolecular self-assembly and multiple chemical modifications. These processes are generally difficult to predict, execute, and control. I will describe a new method to accurately and quantitatively predict self-assembly of kinase inhibitors drug molecules into nanoparticles based on their molecular structures. The drugs assemble with the aid of new kind of excipient comprised of highly conjugated sulfated molecule into particles with ultra-high drug loadings of up to 90%. Using quantitative structure-nanoparticle assembly prediction (QSNAP) calculations and machine learning, a new algorithm was developed as highly predictive indicators of both nano-self assembly and nanoparticle size with unprecedented accuracy.
    Close abstract

    Molecular mechanisms of senescence on the crossroads of cancer and aging

    Date:
    14
    Thursday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Valery Krizhanovsky
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Special Guest Seminar

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:00-17:30
    Title: "Dietary sulfur amino acids modulate kidney function and anti-tumor immunity via the gut microbiota"
    Lecturer: Dr. Lior Lobel
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Mee ... Read more https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96460895671?pwd=VktPaXNSR3lyNUVBZktzRnB3Rys5UT09 Meeting ID: 964 6089 5671 Password: 599560
    Close details

    PCR-free sensing of Covid-19, metastatic mRNA biomarkers and towards single-cell proteomic

    Date:
    03
    Sunday
    January
    2021
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Lecturer: Prof. Amit Meller
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98521602060?pwd=T1B1TEJqcXEwUW50QzBEaXd3R ... Read more Zoom Link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/98521602060?pwd=T1B1TEJqcXEwUW50QzBEaXd3RS9XZz09 SARS-CoV-2 outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has underlined the acute need for extremely sensitive, accurate, fast, point-of-care mRNA quantification sensors. Here I will show how solid-state nanopores can be used to digitally count target mRNA molecules from both biological and clinical Covid-19 samples surpassing the accuracy and gold-standard” RT-qPCR. Additionally, we applied our method for the sensing of cancer metastatic mRNA biomarkers MACC1 and S100A4 at early stage of the diseases, suggesting a potential use of the method in early precision medicine diagnostics. Moving beyond nucleic acids, I will discuss our on-going efforts towards the use of plasmonic nanopore devices for the single protein molecules identification based on partial labelling of only two or three amino acids. This research opens up vast directions for single-cell proteomics of even rarely expressed proteins.
    Close abstract

    The transformation of healthcare through AI technologies: The story of breast cancer

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96689343910?pwd=VGlpaGNOejVWTGdveXJzeDdjYXdUdz09
    Lecturer: Dr. Michal Rosen-Zvi

    Stromal dynamic plasticity shapes the microenvironment in breast cancer metastasis

    Date:
    17
    Thursday
    December
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Briefs
    Lecturer: Prof. Neta Erez, PhD
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Cancer evolution, immune evasion and metastasis

    Date:
    19
    Thursday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Charles Swanton MD PhD FMedSci FRS
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Love thy neighbor - unraveling the tumor microenvironment by multiplexed imaging

    Date:
    17
    Tuesday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Leeat Keren
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Tumors are spatially organized ecosystems that are comprised of distinct cell ty ... Read more Tumors are spatially organized ecosystems that are comprised of distinct cell types, each of which can assume a variety of phenotypes defined by coexpression of multiple proteins. To underscore this complexity, and move beyond single cells to multicellular interactions, it is essential to interrogate cellular expression patterns within their native context in the tissue. We have pioneered MIBI-TOF (Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging by Time of Flight), a platform that enables simultaneous imaging of forty proteins within intact tissue sections at subcellular resolution. In this talk, I will describe our application of multiplexed imaging to study the tumor immune microenvironment in triple negative breast cancer. Our work reveals archetypical organizations, linking molecular expression patterns, cell composition and histology, which are predictive of patient survival.
    Close abstract

    Recent Advances in Flow and Imaging Flow Cytometry

    Date:
    05
    Thursday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Title: Features
    Location: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/96479787051?pwd=cGx2eHhNeEc3WE9sbnV1ZW1oYWI2QT09
    Lecturer: Dr. Ziv Porat
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    Order from Chaos: Chromosome Catastrophes Drive Cancer Evolution

    Date:
    03
    Tuesday
    November
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Ofer Shoshani
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Details: Via Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97929291684?pwd=R2tFbmoweThSbmliYU9OZGFRTn ... Read more Via Zoom: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/97929291684?pwd=R2tFbmoweThSbmliYU9OZGFRTnlqUT09 Passcode: 834392
    Close details
    Abstract: Chromosomal instability is one of the major hallmarks in cancer driving numerica ... Read more Chromosomal instability is one of the major hallmarks in cancer driving numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Cancer cells can use the chaotic background of chromosome instability to generate ordered genomic events leading to accelerated tumor formation or drug resistance. First, I will discuss how transient centrosome amplification can induce a burst of chromosomal instability in vivo. This triggers the formation of random aneuploidies (changes in chromosome numbers) with cancer initiating cells carrying a specific aneuploidy signature leading to accelerated tumorigenesis. This work has uncovered aneuploidy as a direct driver of cancer and enables a better understanding of the involvement of specific aneuploidies in cancer. Second, I will describe how chromothripsis, the catastrophic shattering of a chromosome and random religation of its pieces, can promote resistance to therapy. Using cancer cells and patient samples, I identified that chromothripsis drives the formation and evolution of extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA) elements that can amplify genes conferring drug resistance. Chromothripsis depends on non-homologous DNA end joining repair, a vulnerability that could be exploited for therapeutic purposes by preventing resistance to chemotherapy. I will conclude by discussing an outlook towards the exciting new directions opened by this work.
    Close abstract

    BRCA mutations rewire stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment

    Date:
    29
    Thursday
    October
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr Ruth Scherz-Shouval
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Effects of p16Ink4a and cellular senescence on tissue function and cancer development

    Date:
    15
    Thursday
    October
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Ittai Ben-Porath
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Germinal centers and immunological niches

    Date:
    13
    Tuesday
    October
    2020
    -
    16
    Friday
    October
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Tumor exosome biomarkers for early cancer detection

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    September
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: David Lyden MD, PhD
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
    Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

    Reversing personalized medicine

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    September
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:30-14:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Gal Markel
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology
    Details: the link for the lecture's zoom room https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd= ... Read more the link for the lecture's zoom room https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
    Close details
    Abstract: Personalized medicine in oncology is focused on fitting drugs to the appropriat ... Read more Personalized medicine in oncology is focused on fitting drugs to the appropriate patients, mainly by identifying unique mutations in tumor genomics and development of highly selective drugs. The main challenge is that the relevant populations grow smaller, while development costs are constant, leading to significant reduction in effective drug development. The immune system provides personalized anti cancer response, and immune checkpoint inhibitors enable decent responses over a wide array of tumors. The outstanding challenge is that efficacy is observed in less than a third of the patients. Here we explore strategies to alter the patient in a way that will enable standard of care immunotherapy to exert its full potential, i.e. fitting the patients to the existing immunotherapeutic medications.
    Close abstract

    New pre-clinical tools for guiding efficient therapies against head and neck cancer

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    August
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Moshe Elkabets
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology

    Deciphering the immunogenomic landscape in melanoma

    Date:
    29
    Wednesday
    July
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Yardena Samuels
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research

    ClearSight™: A portable system that uses diffusion NMR to probe the margins of excised tumors

    Date:
    16
    Thursday
    July
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Lecturer: Dr. Saul Stokar
    Organizer: Clore Institute for High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy
    Abstract: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91154950215?pwd=ZkRsTWJzL1AzMWpNbFVSVUF4d0 ... Read more Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91154950215?pwd=ZkRsTWJzL1AzMWpNbFVSVUF4d05zQT09 Password: 388848 Diffusion NMR weighted NMR and MRI are very powerful techniques for investigating microscopic details about tissue architecture, either normal or in a diseased state. In addition to its traditional use in diagnosing stroke and ischemic injury in the brain, in recent years DWI has been used to diagnose various kinds of cancer, including breast, prostate and lung cancers. In this seminar we will present an overview of a novel portable system that uses DWI to check whether the margins of excised breast tumors are tumor-free. This is extremely important both for the patient and the hospital, since it obviates the need to perform additional surgery if the subsequent pathology indicates the presence of tumor on the margin of the excised tissue, something that occurs today in up to 25% of breast-conserving surgeries. We shall provide an overview of diffusion MRI, the unique challenges of performing MRI in or near the operating theater, the architecture of ClearCut's system, computer simulations of its performance and an overview of the clinical results obtained to date.
    Close abstract

    Sparsity-based Methods for Rapid MRI

    Date:
    25
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Lecturer: Dr. Efrat Shimron
    Organizer: Clore Institute for High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy
    Abstract: Zoom Lecture: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99058507421 Magnetic Resonance Ima ... Read more Zoom Lecture: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99058507421 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a superb imaging modality that provides high-quality images of the human body. However, one of its major limitations is the long acquisition time, which hinders the MRI clinical use. The acquisition time can be shortened by acquiring less data; however, this requires suitable methods for accurate image reconstruction from subsampled data, which is acquired with a sub-Nyquist rate. In this seminar, four novel methods for image reconstruction from subsampled data will be presented. These methods build upon the well-established frameworks of Parallel Imaging (PI) and Compressed Sensing (CS), utilize a-priori knowledge about data sparsity, and address current limitations of PI-CS methods. The first two methods accelerate static MRI scans by introducing the Convolution-based Reconstruction (CORE) framework, which offers a parameter-free non-iterative reconstruction. Experiments with in-vivo 7T brain data demonstrated that these methods perform comparably to the well-established GRAPPA and l1-SPIRiT methods, with the advantage of shorter computation times and reduced need for parameter calibration. The next two developed methods accelerate dynamic MRI scans that provide temperature monitoring in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) thermal ablation treatments. The developed methods enable rapid MR monitoring by reconstructing temperature changes from subsampled data. Validation experiments were performed with in-vivo data from clinical treatments of prostate cancer in humans; these showed that the proposed methods significantly outperform two state-of-the-art methods in the temperature reconstruction task
    Close abstract

    A new dawn for eosinophils in the tumor microenvironment

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Ariel Munitz
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research

    Cancer Research Club - Prof Dan Landau: Novel genomics perspectives on cancer evolution: from basic principles to therapeutic optimization

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Dan Landau
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology

    Using small molecules to study translational control by eIF1A

    Date:
    12
    Tuesday
    May
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:45
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Daniel Hayat
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulato ... Read more Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulatory factor yet little is known about its exact role in the translation process of mammalian cells. Previous work in our lab have shown that eIF1A interacts with ribosomal proteins RPS3 and RPS10 and these interactions are disrupted by eIF1A cancer-associated mutants. As the activities of eIF1A are critically dependent on its ability to bind the ribosome, we targeted eIF1A-RPS10 complex to identify eIF1A inhibitors, using high throughput drug screen. We found 21 eIF1A inhibitors which affected eIF1A known translational roles and divided them to groups according to the protein they bind. Several inhibitors which can differentiate between eIF1A known functions were identified and inhibitor 1Ai-5662 showed dramatic affect in decreasing uveal melanoma cells viability. Our results show the benefits of using small molecules research approach.
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    "The transformation of Healthcare through AI technologies: the story of breast cancer"

    Date:
    22
    Sunday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Michal Rosen-Zvi

    Using small molecules to study translational control by eIF1A

    Date:
    17
    Tuesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-10:45
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Daniel Hayat
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulato ... Read more Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulatory factor yet little is known about its exact role in the translation process of mammalian cells. Previous work in our lab have shown that eIF1A interacts with ribosomal proteins RPS3 and RPS10 and these interactions are disrupted by eIF1A cancer-associated mutants. As the activities of eIF1A are critically dependent on its ability to bind the ribosome, we targeted eIF1A-RPS10 complex to identify eIF1A inhibitors, using high throughput drug screen. We found 21 eIF1A inhibitors which affected eIF1A known translational roles and divided them to groups according to the protein they bind. Several inhibitors which can differentiate between eIF1A known functions were identified and inhibitor 1Ai-5662 showed dramatic affect in decreasing uveal melanoma cells viability. Our results show the benefits of using small molecules research approach.
    Close abstract

    Mechanisms of cancer protection in Laron Syndrome

    Date:
    12
    Thursday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Haim Werner
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology

    Introduction to the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center and DNA targeted cancer therapeutics

    Date:
    05
    Thursday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Stanton L Gerson MD
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology

    MR spectroscopy at 7 tesla – initial experiences in Glasgow

    Date:
    05
    Thursday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Dr Graeme Keith
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Much has been written of the potential of ultra-high field MR scanners, such as ... Read more Much has been written of the potential of ultra-high field MR scanners, such as 7 tesla, due to their inherently higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This native boost is of great use in making techniques that operate in a low SNR regime, such as spectroscopy, more viable. Application of spectroscopic techniques at 7 tesla also come with a secondary, yet perhaps more important benefit in increased spectral resolution. This can allow for the quantitative investigation of metabolites that are difficult to resolve and measure reliably at lower field strengths. This seminar will relate early experiences in spectroscopy from the Siemens Terra 7T system at the University of Glasgow. This will include the optimisation of single voxel techniques for clinical studies, such as the measurement of glutamate in neuroinflammatory conditions, as well as an update on development work, such as a spectral 2D correlated spectroscopy (COSY) acquisition for investigation of glioma tumours, including a focus on 2-hydorxyglutarate. It will also cover the development of a novel MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) technique based on the EPSI sequence, which will allow for high resolution, full spectral bandwidth 7T acquisitions in a clinically viable time, by application of compressed sensing methods
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    Pushing the Limits of Fluorescence in a Fluorochrome Limited World

    Date:
    04
    Wednesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: Introducing the Aurora Spectral Flow Cytometry
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Joanne Lannigan, M.Sc
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Details: Cytek Biosciences and the Weismann Institute are pleased to announce that Cytek ... Read more Cytek Biosciences and the Weismann Institute are pleased to announce that Cytek will be presenting a seminar on the Aurora system. This novel flow cytometer expands the breadth of applications that are currently available on conventional cytometers. The system incorporates a new technology that maximizes the benefits of spectral flow cytometry. Please join us for a seminar by Joanne Lannigan, where the following topics will be discussed: • Why do spectral flow cytometry? • Main differences between conventional and high resolution spectral flow cytometry • How to achieve high resolution spectral flow cytometry • Fluorochrome options • Panel design considerations • Multicolor data examples (30 color+)
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    Multidomain Peptide Assemblies for the Design of Adaptive Supramolecular Polymers and Synthetic Vaccines

    Date:
    03
    Tuesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Pol Besenius
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Chemistry and Materials Science
    Abstract: Spatial and temporal control are critical properties to advance functional macro ... Read more Spatial and temporal control are critical properties to advance functional macromolecular materials in order to mimic key features of living systems. In my lecture, I will discuss our methodology in developing multicomponent supramolecular polymerization strategies in water. Using peptide-polymer conjugates we are able to address non-equilibrium states in the preparation of thermoresponsive hydrogel materials. Here, we make use of charge regulated ß–sheet selfassembly of oligopeptides and introduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsive subdomains to tune the time-domain of supramolecular polymerization. Using multicomponent assembly protocols, we currently explore the co-presentation of different epitopes and immunostimulating agents at the surface of supramolecular polymers. I will briefly discuss this modular supramolecular platform for immunotherapy applications and the development of multifunctional antitumor vaccines.
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    PRMT1 inhibition induces differentiation of colon cancer cells

    Date:
    06
    Thursday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Title: LSCF departmental seminar
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Alexander Plotnikov
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    Next Gen Immunology 2020

    Date:
    02
    Sunday
    February
    2020
    -
    05
    Wednesday
    February
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium
    Organizer: The M.D. Moross Institute for Cancer Research,Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology,The Nancy and Stephen Grand Center for Sensors and Security

    Rewiring cellular metabolism: novel insights into the role of estrogen receptor activating mutations in breast cancer

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ido Wolf
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology

    Chemical and Biological Physics Dept Seminar

    Date:
    28
    Tuesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Title: Wide-Field Single Photon-Counting Imaging for Fast and Highly Sensitive In Vivo Cell Tracking
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Dr Rinat Ankri
    Organizer: Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Abstract: Biomolecular imaging at the preclinical stage is an essential tool in various bi ... Read more Biomolecular imaging at the preclinical stage is an essential tool in various biomedical research areas such as immunology, oncology or neurology. Among all modalities available to date, optical imaging techniques play a central role, while fluorescence, in particular in the NIR region of the spectrum, provides high sensitivity and high specificity with relatively cheap instrumentation. Several whole-body optical pre-clinical NIR imaging systems are commercially available. Instruments using continuous wave (CW or time-independent) illumination allow basic small animal imaging at low cost. However, CW techniques cannot provide fluorescence lifetime contrast, which allows to probe the microenvironment and affords an increased multiplexing power. In the first part of my talk I will introduce our single photon, time-gated, phasor-based fluorescence lifetime Imaging method which circumvents limitations of conventional techniques in speed, specificity and ease of use, using fluorescent lifetime as the main contrast mechanism. In the second part of my talk I will present the tracking and multiplexing of two different cell populations, based on their different lifetimes (following their fluorescent dyes-loading). Despite major advantages of optical based NIR imaging, the reason that NIR imagers are not clinically used, is that only very few such fluorescent molecules absorb and emit in the NIR (or in the shortwave infrared, SWIR region), and even fewer have favorable biological properties (and FDA approval). I will introduce small lung cancer and dendritic cells tracking using small polyethylene glycol/phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG–PE) micelles loaded with NIR dyes (using commercial dyes as well as dyes synthesized in Prof. Sletten’s lab, UCLA Chemistry Dept.). Micelles’ endocytosis into cells affords efficient loading and exhibits strong bio stability, enabling to track the loaded cells for several days using these formulations, even though dyes were diluted by cells division (leading to reduced dye concentration within the dividing cells). Moreover, fluorescent lifetime contrast (achieved through our time-gated imaging method), significantly improved these cells detection. These advances in NIR fluorescence based imaging open up new avenues toward NIR and SWIR imaging for biomedical applications, such as tracking and monitoring cells during immunotherapy and/or drug delivery (treatment monitoring) for various types of disease.
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    Regulating the regulators:

    Date:
    23
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Title: Regulation of NK cell intracellular inhibitory immune checkpoint to govern anti-tumor immunity
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Mira Barda-Saad
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology

    IMM Guest seminar- Dr. Ela Elyada, will lecture on "Uncovering fibroblast heterogeneity in pancreatic cancer".

    Date:
    22
    Wednesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Organizer: Department of Systems Immunology

    Cancer-associated fibroblast compositions change with breast-cancer progression and correlate with clinical outcome

    Date:
    21
    Tuesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Gil Friedman
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are non-malignant tumor-supporting cells, w ... Read more Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are non-malignant tumor-supporting cells, which are highly abundant in the majority of carcinomas, and carry out distinct cancer related functions. The wide range of CAF activities suggests that CAFs are heterogenous and dynamically change. We analyzed CAFs using index and transcriptional single-cell sorting, at several time-points along breast tumor progression in mice, uncovering distinct subpopulations with transitioning transcriptional programs. We have further stained and analyzed sections of human breast tumors, and found that the two main CAF subpopulations are also present in human breast cancer, and that their ratio is associated with disease outcome
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    Guest seminar- Dr. Livnat Jerby-Arnon, will lecture on "Dissecting immune evasion mechanisms in cancer using single-cell technologies”

    Date:
    19
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Organizer: Department of Systems Immunology

    Pharmacological induction of selective endoplasmic reticulum retention as a novel strategy for cancer therapy

    Date:
    16
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Boaz Tirosh
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology

    PhD Defense Seminar - “Phenotypic and Mechanistic Characterization of Cancer Persisters”

    Date:
    13
    Monday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Adi Jacob Berger
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    The Critical Role of Chronology in Understanding Past Climate Change: Precisely Reconstructing Holocene Climate at Mono Lake, California

    Date:
    05
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Location: Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    Lecturer: Susan R. H. Zimmerman
    Organizer: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Abstract: Recent droughts and floods in California have drawn attention to the vulnerabili ... Read more Recent droughts and floods in California have drawn attention to the vulnerability of our water-supply system to present and future climate variability. A recent analysis of climate-model simulations suggests that wet and dry conditions in California may be predictably linked to tropical and high-latitude conditions, a hypothesis that should be testable using paleoclimate records. Abundant paleoclimate evidence indicates that natural whiplash between wet and dry conditions characterized California’s climate throughout the last 4000 years, especially during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (~AD 950 to 1250), but the chronologies of the records are not precise enough to correlate to tropical and high-latitude records in order to test the model prediction. Our recent work at Mono Lake, a climatically sensitive lake on the arid eastern side of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, has focused on exploring and developing radiocarbon dating of pollen purified by flow cytometry as a tool for high-resolution dating of lake records. Our results suggest that pollen can be reliably separated and dated, but (like everything in lakes) must be interpreted within the specific geologic system where it was produced, deposited, and preserved. If pollen dating proves robust in many lake systems, it may provide the high-precision chronologies required for spatial mapping of past terrestrial climate changes.
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    Proteomics of Melanoma Response to Immunotherapy Reveals Dependence on Mitochondrial Metabolism

    Date:
    02
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Tamar Geiger
    Organizer: Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology