Upcoming

All upcoming events

Tumor exosome biomarkers for early cancer detection

Date:
24
Thursday
September
2020
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
Lecturer: David Lyden MD, PhD
Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

Germinal centers and immunological niches

Date:
13
Tuesday
October
2020
-
16
Friday
October
2020
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

Effects of p16Ink4a and cellular senescence on tissue function and cancer development

Date:
15
Thursday
October
2020
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
Lecturer: Prof. Ittai Ben-Porath
Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

BRCA mutations rewire stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment

Date:
29
Thursday
October
2020
Lecture / Seminar
Time: 14:00-15:00
Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
Lecturer: Dr Ruth Scherz-Shouval
Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research
Details: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09

18th International p53 Workshop

Date:
11
Sunday
July
2021
-
15
Thursday
July
2021
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium

Cancer ImmunoMetabolism 2021

Date:
12
Sunday
September
2021
-
14
Tuesday
September
2021
Conference
Time: 08:00
Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Past

    All Events

    Reversing personalized medicine

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    September
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:30-14:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Gal Markel
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Details: the link for the lecture's zoom room https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd= ... Read more the link for the lecture's zoom room https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/5065402023?pwd=a3Z6KzRCU0xJaUFoM2Y5emZwZm1oZz09
    Close details
    Abstract: Personalized medicine in oncology is focused on fitting drugs to the appropriat ... Read more Personalized medicine in oncology is focused on fitting drugs to the appropriate patients, mainly by identifying unique mutations in tumor genomics and development of highly selective drugs. The main challenge is that the relevant populations grow smaller, while development costs are constant, leading to significant reduction in effective drug development. The immune system provides personalized anti cancer response, and immune checkpoint inhibitors enable decent responses over a wide array of tumors. The outstanding challenge is that efficacy is observed in less than a third of the patients. Here we explore strategies to alter the patient in a way that will enable standard of care immunotherapy to exert its full potential, i.e. fitting the patients to the existing immunotherapeutic medications.
    Close abstract

    New pre-clinical tools for guiding efficient therapies against head and neck cancer

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    August
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Moshe Elkabets
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Deciphering the immunogenomic landscape in melanoma

    Date:
    29
    Wednesday
    July
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Yardena Samuels
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research

    ClearSight™: A portable system that uses diffusion NMR to probe the margins of excised tumors

    Date:
    16
    Thursday
    July
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Lecturer: Dr. Saul Stokar
    Organizer: Clore Institute for High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy
    Abstract: Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91154950215?pwd=ZkRsTWJzL1AzMWpNbFVSVUF4d0 ... Read more Zoom link: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/91154950215?pwd=ZkRsTWJzL1AzMWpNbFVSVUF4d05zQT09 Password: 388848 Diffusion NMR weighted NMR and MRI are very powerful techniques for investigating microscopic details about tissue architecture, either normal or in a diseased state. In addition to its traditional use in diagnosing stroke and ischemic injury in the brain, in recent years DWI has been used to diagnose various kinds of cancer, including breast, prostate and lung cancers. In this seminar we will present an overview of a novel portable system that uses DWI to check whether the margins of excised breast tumors are tumor-free. This is extremely important both for the patient and the hospital, since it obviates the need to perform additional surgery if the subsequent pathology indicates the presence of tumor on the margin of the excised tissue, something that occurs today in up to 25% of breast-conserving surgeries. We shall provide an overview of diffusion MRI, the unique challenges of performing MRI in or near the operating theater, the architecture of ClearCut's system, computer simulations of its performance and an overview of the clinical results obtained to date.
    Close abstract

    Sparsity-based Methods for Rapid MRI

    Date:
    25
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Lecturer: Dr. Efrat Shimron
    Organizer: Clore Institute for High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy
    Abstract: Zoom Lecture: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99058507421 Magnetic Resonance Ima ... Read more Zoom Lecture: https://weizmann.zoom.us/j/99058507421 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a superb imaging modality that provides high-quality images of the human body. However, one of its major limitations is the long acquisition time, which hinders the MRI clinical use. The acquisition time can be shortened by acquiring less data; however, this requires suitable methods for accurate image reconstruction from subsampled data, which is acquired with a sub-Nyquist rate. In this seminar, four novel methods for image reconstruction from subsampled data will be presented. These methods build upon the well-established frameworks of Parallel Imaging (PI) and Compressed Sensing (CS), utilize a-priori knowledge about data sparsity, and address current limitations of PI-CS methods. The first two methods accelerate static MRI scans by introducing the Convolution-based Reconstruction (CORE) framework, which offers a parameter-free non-iterative reconstruction. Experiments with in-vivo 7T brain data demonstrated that these methods perform comparably to the well-established GRAPPA and l1-SPIRiT methods, with the advantage of shorter computation times and reduced need for parameter calibration. The next two developed methods accelerate dynamic MRI scans that provide temperature monitoring in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) thermal ablation treatments. The developed methods enable rapid MR monitoring by reconstructing temperature changes from subsampled data. Validation experiments were performed with in-vivo data from clinical treatments of prostate cancer in humans; these showed that the proposed methods significantly outperform two state-of-the-art methods in the temperature reconstruction task
    Close abstract

    A new dawn for eosinophils in the tumor microenvironment

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Ariel Munitz
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research

    Cancer Research Club - Prof Dan Landau: Novel genomics perspectives on cancer evolution: from basic principles to therapeutic optimization

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    June
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Dan Landau
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Using small molecules to study translational control by eIF1A

    Date:
    12
    Tuesday
    May
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:45
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Daniel Hayat
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulato ... Read more Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulatory factor yet little is known about its exact role in the translation process of mammalian cells. Previous work in our lab have shown that eIF1A interacts with ribosomal proteins RPS3 and RPS10 and these interactions are disrupted by eIF1A cancer-associated mutants. As the activities of eIF1A are critically dependent on its ability to bind the ribosome, we targeted eIF1A-RPS10 complex to identify eIF1A inhibitors, using high throughput drug screen. We found 21 eIF1A inhibitors which affected eIF1A known translational roles and divided them to groups according to the protein they bind. Several inhibitors which can differentiate between eIF1A known functions were identified and inhibitor 1Ai-5662 showed dramatic affect in decreasing uveal melanoma cells viability. Our results show the benefits of using small molecules research approach.
    Close abstract

    "The transformation of Healthcare through AI technologies: the story of breast cancer"

    Date:
    22
    Sunday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Michal Rosen-Zvi

    Using small molecules to study translational control by eIF1A

    Date:
    17
    Tuesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-10:45
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Daniel Hayat
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulato ... Read more Eukaryotic initiation factor 1A (eIF1A) is a key translation initiation regulatory factor yet little is known about its exact role in the translation process of mammalian cells. Previous work in our lab have shown that eIF1A interacts with ribosomal proteins RPS3 and RPS10 and these interactions are disrupted by eIF1A cancer-associated mutants. As the activities of eIF1A are critically dependent on its ability to bind the ribosome, we targeted eIF1A-RPS10 complex to identify eIF1A inhibitors, using high throughput drug screen. We found 21 eIF1A inhibitors which affected eIF1A known translational roles and divided them to groups according to the protein they bind. Several inhibitors which can differentiate between eIF1A known functions were identified and inhibitor 1Ai-5662 showed dramatic affect in decreasing uveal melanoma cells viability. Our results show the benefits of using small molecules research approach.
    Close abstract

    Mechanisms of cancer protection in Laron Syndrome

    Date:
    12
    Thursday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Haim Werner
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Introduction to the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center and DNA targeted cancer therapeutics

    Date:
    05
    Thursday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Stanton L Gerson MD
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    MR spectroscopy at 7 tesla – initial experiences in Glasgow

    Date:
    05
    Thursday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Dr Graeme Keith
    Organizer: Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Abstract: Much has been written of the potential of ultra-high field MR scanners, such as ... Read more Much has been written of the potential of ultra-high field MR scanners, such as 7 tesla, due to their inherently higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This native boost is of great use in making techniques that operate in a low SNR regime, such as spectroscopy, more viable. Application of spectroscopic techniques at 7 tesla also come with a secondary, yet perhaps more important benefit in increased spectral resolution. This can allow for the quantitative investigation of metabolites that are difficult to resolve and measure reliably at lower field strengths. This seminar will relate early experiences in spectroscopy from the Siemens Terra 7T system at the University of Glasgow. This will include the optimisation of single voxel techniques for clinical studies, such as the measurement of glutamate in neuroinflammatory conditions, as well as an update on development work, such as a spectral 2D correlated spectroscopy (COSY) acquisition for investigation of glioma tumours, including a focus on 2-hydorxyglutarate. It will also cover the development of a novel MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) technique based on the EPSI sequence, which will allow for high resolution, full spectral bandwidth 7T acquisitions in a clinically viable time, by application of compressed sensing methods
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    Pushing the Limits of Fluorescence in a Fluorochrome Limited World

    Date:
    04
    Wednesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: Introducing the Aurora Spectral Flow Cytometry
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Joanne Lannigan, M.Sc
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Details: Cytek Biosciences and the Weismann Institute are pleased to announce that Cytek ... Read more Cytek Biosciences and the Weismann Institute are pleased to announce that Cytek will be presenting a seminar on the Aurora system. This novel flow cytometer expands the breadth of applications that are currently available on conventional cytometers. The system incorporates a new technology that maximizes the benefits of spectral flow cytometry. Please join us for a seminar by Joanne Lannigan, where the following topics will be discussed: • Why do spectral flow cytometry? • Main differences between conventional and high resolution spectral flow cytometry • How to achieve high resolution spectral flow cytometry • Fluorochrome options • Panel design considerations • Multicolor data examples (30 color+)
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    Multidomain Peptide Assemblies for the Design of Adaptive Supramolecular Polymers and Synthetic Vaccines

    Date:
    03
    Tuesday
    March
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Dr. Pol Besenius
    Organizer: Department of Organic Chemistry
    Abstract: Spatial and temporal control are critical properties to advance functional macro ... Read more Spatial and temporal control are critical properties to advance functional macromolecular materials in order to mimic key features of living systems. In my lecture, I will discuss our methodology in developing multicomponent supramolecular polymerization strategies in water. Using peptide-polymer conjugates we are able to address non-equilibrium states in the preparation of thermoresponsive hydrogel materials. Here, we make use of charge regulated ß–sheet selfassembly of oligopeptides and introduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsive subdomains to tune the time-domain of supramolecular polymerization. Using multicomponent assembly protocols, we currently explore the co-presentation of different epitopes and immunostimulating agents at the surface of supramolecular polymers. I will briefly discuss this modular supramolecular platform for immunotherapy applications and the development of multifunctional antitumor vaccines.
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    POSTPONED: Bridging Between Basic Cancer Research and Innovative Therapies

    Date:
    02
    Monday
    March
    2020
    -
    04
    Wednesday
    March
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium

    PRMT1 inhibition induces differentiation of colon cancer cells

    Date:
    06
    Thursday
    February
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-10:00
    Title: LSCF departmental seminar
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Alexander Plotnikov
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    Next Gen Immunology 2020

    Date:
    02
    Sunday
    February
    2020
    -
    05
    Wednesday
    February
    2020
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Michael Sela Adutitorium
    Organizer: The M.D. Moross Institute for Cancer Research,Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology,The Nancy and Stephen Grand Center for Sensors and Security

    Rewiring cellular metabolism: novel insights into the role of estrogen receptor activating mutations in breast cancer

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ido Wolf
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Chemical and Biological Physics Dept Seminar

    Date:
    28
    Tuesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Title: Wide-Field Single Photon-Counting Imaging for Fast and Highly Sensitive In Vivo Cell Tracking
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Dr Rinat Ankri
    Organizer: Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Abstract: Biomolecular imaging at the preclinical stage is an essential tool in various bi ... Read more Biomolecular imaging at the preclinical stage is an essential tool in various biomedical research areas such as immunology, oncology or neurology. Among all modalities available to date, optical imaging techniques play a central role, while fluorescence, in particular in the NIR region of the spectrum, provides high sensitivity and high specificity with relatively cheap instrumentation. Several whole-body optical pre-clinical NIR imaging systems are commercially available. Instruments using continuous wave (CW or time-independent) illumination allow basic small animal imaging at low cost. However, CW techniques cannot provide fluorescence lifetime contrast, which allows to probe the microenvironment and affords an increased multiplexing power. In the first part of my talk I will introduce our single photon, time-gated, phasor-based fluorescence lifetime Imaging method which circumvents limitations of conventional techniques in speed, specificity and ease of use, using fluorescent lifetime as the main contrast mechanism. In the second part of my talk I will present the tracking and multiplexing of two different cell populations, based on their different lifetimes (following their fluorescent dyes-loading). Despite major advantages of optical based NIR imaging, the reason that NIR imagers are not clinically used, is that only very few such fluorescent molecules absorb and emit in the NIR (or in the shortwave infrared, SWIR region), and even fewer have favorable biological properties (and FDA approval). I will introduce small lung cancer and dendritic cells tracking using small polyethylene glycol/phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG–PE) micelles loaded with NIR dyes (using commercial dyes as well as dyes synthesized in Prof. Sletten’s lab, UCLA Chemistry Dept.). Micelles’ endocytosis into cells affords efficient loading and exhibits strong bio stability, enabling to track the loaded cells for several days using these formulations, even though dyes were diluted by cells division (leading to reduced dye concentration within the dividing cells). Moreover, fluorescent lifetime contrast (achieved through our time-gated imaging method), significantly improved these cells detection. These advances in NIR fluorescence based imaging open up new avenues toward NIR and SWIR imaging for biomedical applications, such as tracking and monitoring cells during immunotherapy and/or drug delivery (treatment monitoring) for various types of disease.
    Close abstract

    Regulating the regulators:

    Date:
    23
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Title: Regulation of NK cell intracellular inhibitory immune checkpoint to govern anti-tumor immunity
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Mira Barda-Saad
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    IMM Guest seminar- Dr. Ela Elyada, will lecture on "Uncovering fibroblast heterogeneity in pancreatic cancer".

    Date:
    22
    Wednesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Cancer-associated fibroblast compositions change with breast-cancer progression and correlate with clinical outcome

    Date:
    21
    Tuesday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Gil Friedman
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are non-malignant tumor-supporting cells, w ... Read more Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are non-malignant tumor-supporting cells, which are highly abundant in the majority of carcinomas, and carry out distinct cancer related functions. The wide range of CAF activities suggests that CAFs are heterogenous and dynamically change. We analyzed CAFs using index and transcriptional single-cell sorting, at several time-points along breast tumor progression in mice, uncovering distinct subpopulations with transitioning transcriptional programs. We have further stained and analyzed sections of human breast tumors, and found that the two main CAF subpopulations are also present in human breast cancer, and that their ratio is associated with disease outcome
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    Guest seminar- Dr. Livnat Jerby-Arnon, will lecture on "Dissecting immune evasion mechanisms in cancer using single-cell technologies”

    Date:
    19
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Pharmacological induction of selective endoplasmic reticulum retention as a novel strategy for cancer therapy

    Date:
    16
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Boaz Tirosh
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    PhD Defense Seminar - “Phenotypic and Mechanistic Characterization of Cancer Persisters”

    Date:
    13
    Monday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Adi Jacob Berger
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    The Critical Role of Chronology in Understanding Past Climate Change: Precisely Reconstructing Holocene Climate at Mono Lake, California

    Date:
    05
    Sunday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Location: Sussman Family Building for Environmental Sciences
    Lecturer: Susan R. H. Zimmerman
    Organizer: Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    Abstract: Recent droughts and floods in California have drawn attention to the vulnerabili ... Read more Recent droughts and floods in California have drawn attention to the vulnerability of our water-supply system to present and future climate variability. A recent analysis of climate-model simulations suggests that wet and dry conditions in California may be predictably linked to tropical and high-latitude conditions, a hypothesis that should be testable using paleoclimate records. Abundant paleoclimate evidence indicates that natural whiplash between wet and dry conditions characterized California’s climate throughout the last 4000 years, especially during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (~AD 950 to 1250), but the chronologies of the records are not precise enough to correlate to tropical and high-latitude records in order to test the model prediction. Our recent work at Mono Lake, a climatically sensitive lake on the arid eastern side of the Sierra Nevada mountain range, has focused on exploring and developing radiocarbon dating of pollen purified by flow cytometry as a tool for high-resolution dating of lake records. Our results suggest that pollen can be reliably separated and dated, but (like everything in lakes) must be interpreted within the specific geologic system where it was produced, deposited, and preserved. If pollen dating proves robust in many lake systems, it may provide the high-precision chronologies required for spatial mapping of past terrestrial climate changes.
    Close abstract

    Proteomics of Melanoma Response to Immunotherapy Reveals Dependence on Mitochondrial Metabolism

    Date:
    02
    Thursday
    January
    2020
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Tamar Geiger
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Hyperactive FOXA1 Signaling in Breast Cancer Endocrine Resistance and Metastasis - When Genomics Meet Epigenomics

    Date:
    26
    Thursday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Rachel Schiff
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Special guest seminar with Moran Dvela-Levitt

    Date:
    22
    Sunday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00-13:00
    Title: “A novel mechanism and therapeutic strategy for protein-misfolding diseases”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Moran Dvela-Levitt
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics
    Abstract: Protein homeostasis is critical for cellular function and survival. Dysregulatio ... Read more Protein homeostasis is critical for cellular function and survival. Dysregulation of the cellular protein homeostasis can lead to a build-up of misfolded proteins and facilitate the manifestation of a variety of pathological disorders including neurodegeneration, cancer and inflammation. Where and how the misfolded proteins accumulate, however, has remained a mystery. In studying MUC1 kidney disease (a rare kidney disorder), we have found that some of these pathologies may share a single, previously unrecognized cellular mechanism: a jam at a specific step in the secretory pathway involving a cargo receptor called TMED9. A small molecule called BRD4780 can break the jam and restore cells to normal function, providing a promising potential for therapeutic developments.
    Close abstract

    1st Israeli ISAC Flow Cytometry workshop

    Date:
    15
    Sunday
    December
    2019
    -
    17
    Tuesday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 00:00
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    TAM Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Signaling in Cancer: Unexpected Roles in the Tumor microenvironment

    Date:
    12
    Thursday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Tal Burstyn-Cohen
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    A new anti-cancer treatment: Insulin regulation of the cytoskeleton

    Date:
    08
    Sunday
    December
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00-16:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Efrat Wertheimer MD PhD
    Organizer: Life Sciences

    A tale of two tales: a. Deconvolving cell-specific expression from bulk tumor data portrays the response to checkpoint therapy b. Uncovering the mutation selection associated with CRISPR editing

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Eytan Ruppin
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Preclinical Imaging using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Boris Epel
    Organizer: Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Abstract: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging is a well-established method for t ... Read more Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging is a well-established method for the study of spatial distribution and local environment of electron paramagnetic centers and spin probes. One of the most important applications of modern EPR imaging is in vivo oximetry in which soluble spin probes with oxygen-dependent relaxation rates are used. Partial oxygen pressure (pO2) levels in tumors are major determinants of the response to cancer therapy. I will present the results of the in vivo oxygen guided radiation targeting study. This study combines pO2 images and conformal radiation delivery using 3D-printed blocks to achieve high precision treatment of tumor hypoxic areas. The study demonstrates that the dose to well-oxygenated tumor volumes in fibrosarcoma tumors in mice can be considerably reduced without compromising the outcome.
    Close abstract

    Autologous stem cells as oncolytic small pox vaccine carriers for immunotherapy of cancer in human patients

    Date:
    21
    Thursday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Aladar A. Szalay
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    From photosynthesis to clinical cancer therapy - the story

    Date:
    19
    Tuesday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:30-12:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Avigdor Scherz
    Organizer: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
    Details: Hosts: Dr. Cathy Bessudo and Dr. Hadas Zehavi

    Chemical Physiology of Antibody Conjugates and Natural Products

    Date:
    19
    Tuesday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Goncalo Bernardes
    Organizer: Department of Organic Chemistry
    Abstract: Our research uses chemistry principles to address questions of importance in lif ... Read more Our research uses chemistry principles to address questions of importance in life sciences and molecular medicine. This lecture will cover recent examples of emerging areas in our group in: (i) methods developed for site-selective chemical modification of proteins at cysteine, disulfide and lysine and their use to build stable and functional protein conjugates for in vivo applications [1–4] (ii) bioorthogonal cleavage reactions for targeted drug activation in cells [5,6] (iii) by identifying on- and off-targets for anti-cancer entities using our own machine intelligence platform, unveiling the underlying molecular mechanisms of target recognition and linking drug target binding to modulation of disease, we explore the use of natural products as selective cancer modulators [7] Recent Publications: 1. Bernardim B; Cal PMSD; Matos MJ; Oliveira BL; Martínez-Sáez N; Albuquerque IS; Corzana F; Burtoloso ACB; Jiménez-Osés G; Bernardes GJL* Stoichiometric and Irreversible Cysteine-selective Protein Modification using Carbonylacrylic Reagents. Nat. Commun. 2016, 7, 13128. 2. Martínez-Saez N; Sun S; Oldrini D; Sormanni P; Boutureira O; Carboni F; Compañón I; Deery MJ; Vendruscolo M; Corzana F; Adamo R; Bernardes GJL* Oxetane Grafts Installed Site-Selectively on Native Disulfides to Enhance Protein Stability and Activity In Vivo. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2017, 47, 14963–14967. 3. Freedy AM; Matos MJ; Omar Boutureira O; Corzana F; Guerreiro A; Somovilla VJ; Rodrigues T; Nicholls K; Xie B; Jiménez-Osés G; Brindle KM; Neves AA; Bernardes GJL* Chemoselective Installation of Amine Bonds on Proteins Through Aza-Michael Ligation. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2017, 139, 18365–18375. 4. Matos MJ; Oliveira BL; Martínez-Sáez N; Guerreiro A; Cal PMSD; Bertoldo J; Maneiro M; Perkins E; Howard J; Deery MJ; Chalker JM; Corzana F; Jiménez-Osés G; Bernardes GJL* Chemo and regioselective lysine modification on native proteins. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2018, 140, 4004–4017. 5. Stenton BJ; Oliveira BL; Matos MJ; Sinatra L; Bernardes GJL* A Thioether-directed Palladium-cleavable Linker for Targeted Bioorthogonal Drug Decaging. Chem. Sci. 2018, 9, 4185–4189. 6. Sun S; Oliveira BL; Jiménez-Osés G; Bernardes GJL* Radical-mediated thiol-ene strategy for photoactivation of thiol-containing drugs in cancer cells. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2018, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201811338. 7. Rodrigues T; Werner M; Roth J; da Cruz EHG; Marques MC; Akkapeddi P; Lobo SA; Koeberle A; Corzana F; da Silva Júnior EN; Werz O; Bernardes GJL* Machine intelligence decrypts β-lapachone as an allosteric 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. Chem. Sci. 2018, 9, 6885–7018.
    Close abstract

    The prospect of immunotherapy to combat Alzheimer's disease and dementia: the key role of the brain's choroid plexus

    Date:
    12
    Tuesday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:30
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Michal Schwartz
    Organizer: Department of Neurobiology
    Details: Host: Dr. Meital Oren meital.oren@weizmann.ac.il tel: 6479 For assistance w ... Read more Host: Dr. Meital Oren meital.oren@weizmann.ac.il tel: 6479 For assistance with accessibility issues, please contact naomi.moses@weizmann.ac.il
    Close details
    Abstract: The brain is no longer considered a completely autonomous tissue with respect t ... Read more The brain is no longer considered a completely autonomous tissue with respect to its immune activity. Rather, immune surveillance is required for supporting brain functional plasticity and repair. Essential immune cells include the microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, and circulating immune cells. Both the resident microglia and the circulating immune cells are under tight regulatory control to allow risk-free benefit from immunological interventions. We found that access of circulating immune cells to the brain is controlled by the brain’s epithelial barrier, the blood cerebrospinal barrier. Using immunological and immunogenomic tools, we discovered that in brain aging and under neurodegenerative conditions, this barrier does not optimally function to enable brain repair. We further showed in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), that activating the immune system by immunotherapy directed against the inhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint pathway drives an immune-dependent cascade of processes that start in the periphery and culminate with recruitment of monocyte-derived macrophages to the brain, which contribute to disease modification, reversing and slowing-down cognitive loss, reducing brain inflammation, and mitigating disease pathology in a mouse models of AD and Dementia (tauopathy). Overall, our results indicate that targeting the immune system outside the brain, rather than brain-specific disease-escalating factors within the central nervous system, can potentially provide a multi-dimensional disease-modifying therapy for AD and dementia.
    Close abstract

    4th Biannual Leukemia meeting

    Date:
    11
    Monday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-15:45
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Tzah Feldman , Prof. Michael Milevsky, Dr. Sigal Tavor, Prof. Claudia Lengerke, Prof. Shai Izraeli, Dr. Amos Tuval , Prof. Irv Weissman
    Organizer: Department of Immunology
    Details: 09:00-09:30 Get together 09:30-10:15 Dr. Tzah Feldman (Shluh’s lab) : “Recu ... Read more 09:00-09:30 Get together 09:30-10:15 Dr. Tzah Feldman (Shluh’s lab) : “Recurrent pre-leukemic deletions are the result of microhomology-mediated end joining DNA repair” 10:15-11:00 10:15-11:00 Prof. Michael Milevsky: “An ERG Enhancer-Based Reporter Identifies Leukemia Cells with Elevated Leukemogenic Potential Driven by ERG-USP9X Feed-Forward Regulation” 11:00-11:15 Coffee break 11:15-12:00 Dr. Sigal Tavor: “Gene expression predicts dasatinib response in a subset of FLT3/ ITD mutated AML.” 12:00-12:45 Prof. Claudia Lengerke: “Immune targeting of leukemia stem cells” 12:45-13:15 lunch break 13:15-14:00 Prof. Shai Izraeli: “JAK-STAT ALLs - pathogenesis and therapeutic challenges” 14:00-14:45 Dr. Amos Tuval (Shlush’s Lab): AML Ontogeny - Beyond Genomics 15:00-15:45 Prof. Irv Weissman: Normal and neoplastic stem cells
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    Mechanisms of endocrine resistance in luminal breast cancer

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    November
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Stefan Wiemann
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    The Barry Sherman Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology Seminar Series Transnational Cancer Research

    Date:
    31
    Thursday
    October
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Converging Cancer Genetics, Structural Biology and Medicinal Chemistry
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Daniel Rauh
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: The Barry Sherman Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology Seminar Series

    Seminar for thesis defense Naama Dekel

    Date:
    30
    Wednesday
    October
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Title: System level study of the cell death functional signature in metastatic melanoma cell lines
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Naama Dekel
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Genetics

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof.Mark Dawson will lecture on "Targeting the Epigenome in Cancer."

    Date:
    24
    Tuesday
    September
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof.Mark Dawson
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    The mitochondrial protein VDAC1 as a new target: From concepts to cancer therapy

    Date:
    12
    Thursday
    September
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Varda Shoshan-Barmatz
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    CNIO - MICC Joint Conference on Cancer Research

    Date:
    03
    Tuesday
    September
    2019
    -
    05
    Thursday
    September
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Moross Integrated Cancer Center (MICC)

    Arrestin in Genitourinary Cancers

    Date:
    15
    Thursday
    August
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Yehia Daaka
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    A New tool box – new paths in melanoma

    Date:
    01
    Thursday
    August
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ze'ev Ronai
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    A Moving Target: Tracking Cancer Plasticity in Cells and in Patients

    Date:
    25
    Thursday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Amir Goldkorn
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Trio correlation between cell mechanics, phagocytic capacity, and cancer aggressiveness

    Date:
    14
    Sunday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ofra Benny
    Organizer: Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Abstract: A comprehensive study showing a trio correlation between cell mechanics, phagocy ... Read more A comprehensive study showing a trio correlation between cell mechanics, phagocytic capacity, and cancer aggressiveness is presented. Mechanical properties of particles are shown to have a critical effect on the interactions with malignant cancer cells. Our findings offers new directions for mechanical based specificity in cancer treatment, and could lead to uptake measurement as a diagnostic tools for precision medicine.
    Close abstract

    PhD Defense Seminar - Characterization of immunotherapy targets in melanoma

    Date:
    09
    Tuesday
    July
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Shelly Kalaora
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof. Ofer Mandelboim will lecture on "TIGIT and its cellular and bacterial ligands: novel checkpoints for cancer immune therapy."

    Date:
    24
    Monday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Ofer Mandelboim
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Single and multi-frequency saturation methods for molecular and microstructural contrast in human MRI”

    Date:
    20
    Thursday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Elena Vinogradov
    Organizer: Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Abstract: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides excellent quality images of soft tissu ... Read more Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides excellent quality images of soft tissues and is an established modality for diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of various diseases. Majority of MRI scans in clinical practice today report on anatomy, morphology and sometimes physiology. The new area of active studies is aimed at developing MRI contrast methods for the detection of the events at the microstructural and molecular level employing endogenous properties. Here, we will discuss methods that employ single- and multi-frequency saturation to detect events on microstructural and molecular level. First, we will describe principles and translational aspects of Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer1(CEST). CEST employs selective saturation of the exchanging protons and subsequent detection of the water signal decrease to create images that are weighted by the presence of a metabolite or pH2. We will describe aspects of translating CEST to reliable clinical applications and discuss its potential uses in human oncology, specifically breast cancer. Second, we will describe a method called inhomogeneous Magnetization Transfer3 (ihMT), which employs dual-frequency saturation to create contrast originating from the residual dipolar couplings and thus specific to microstructure. We will focus on the application of ihMT to the detection of myelin in brain and spinal cord. Finally, we will discuss a novel exchange-sensitive method based on the balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence as an alternative way for chemical exchange detection (bSSFPX4). Using an effective field description, similarities between bSSFP and CW application can be explored and utilized for in-vivo MRI contrast. [1] K. Ward, et.al., JMR,143,79-87 (2000). [2] J. Zhou, et.al., Nature Medicine, 9,1085-1090 (2003). [3] G. Varma, et.al., MRM, 73, 614-622 (2015). [4] S. Zhang, et.al., JMR, 275, 55-67 (2017).
    Close abstract

    RNASEQ Predicts Major Breast Cancer Subtype and Potential to Respond to Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Date:
    18
    Tuesday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Daniel Harari
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Breast cancer (BC) divides into three major subtypes. 1) Estrogen/Progesterone ... Read more Breast cancer (BC) divides into three major subtypes. 1) Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor positive (ER+ve), 2) ErbB2/Her2 genome amplified (Her2+), and for cancers exhibiting none of these markers, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). These classifications defined by histo-pathologists have important ramifications as they indicate alternative therapy options best suited to treat a given patient. We have used high throughput transcriptomic data from > 1000 breast cancer biopsies derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and demonstrate that RNASEQ can with high fidelity subcategorize BC into one of these three major subgroups. Surprisingly, we found that three levels of ErbB2 expression ErbBLOW, ErbB2MED and ErbB2HIGH closely correlate with TNBC, ER+ and HER+ tumor subtypes respectively, a finding not paralleled by genome copy-number alone. Pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes demonstrated that TNBCs are particularly enriched for “Lymphocyte Activation” correlating with “chemotaxis”, “NK-cell activation” and “IFN-gamma signaling”. These immune-related gene signatures may provide an additional layer of clinically-relevant patient information as others have reported that T-cell infiltration into tumors indicate potential good response to cancer immunotherapy (e.g. Anti-PD1, Anti-CTLA4 drugs). We can use these transcriptomic immune signatures to determine their level of expression in individual patients, thus providing context for predicting response to immunotherapy in personalized medicinal manner.
    Close abstract

    SERGIO LOMBROSO AWARD IN CANCER RESEARCH CEREMONY AND SYMPOSIUM

    Date:
    17
    Monday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Life Sciences

    SERGIO LOMBROSO AWARD IN CANCER RESEARCH CEREMONY AND SYMPOSIUM

    Date:
    17
    Monday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-12:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology
    Details: 09:00 Gathering 09:30 Sergio Lombroso Award in Cancer Research ceremony In the ... Read more 09:00 Gathering 09:30 Sergio Lombroso Award in Cancer Research ceremony In the presence of the Lombroso family 2018 Recipient - Prof. Benny Geiger Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 2019 Recipient - Prof. Karen Vousden Francis Crick Institute, London 09:45 Prof. Karen Vousden Francis Crick Institute, London “Playing with fire: the complex roles of p53 in the control of tumour development” 10:30 Coffee Break 10:50 Prof. Benny Geiger Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot “The mechanisms underlying invasive migration of metastatic cancer cells” 11:20 Dr. Ayelet Erez Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot "Modulating amino acid metabolism in cancer for immunotherapy" 11:50 Dr. Ravid Straussman Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot “The tumor microbiome”
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    Nano-Ghosts: Harnessing the power of stem cells to modulate the tumor niche

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Marcelle Machluf
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Cancer Prevention Research: Looking to the Future

    Date:
    13
    Thursday
    June
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:30-16:30
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: The M.D. Moross Institute for Cancer Research

    Dysregulation of alternative splicing in cancer and its modulation as therapy

    Date:
    06
    Thursday
    June
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Rotem Karni
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    FAK Family Kinases: The Yin and Yang of Cancer Metastasis

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Hava Gil
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Chemical and Biological Physics Guest Seminar

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Title: Mechanics of cells and tissues
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Alexandre Kabla
    Organizer: Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Abstract: Cell migration and cell mechanics play a crucial role in a number of key biologi ... Read more Cell migration and cell mechanics play a crucial role in a number of key biological processes, such as embryo development or cancer metastasis. Understanding the way cells control their own material properties and mechanically interact with their environment is key. At a more fundamental level, there is need better measure, describe and monitor cell and tissue mechanics before we can formulate testable hypotheses. In this talk, I will report experimental studies on the mechanical response of two different multicellular structures: epithelial monolayers and early embryonic tissues. In both cases, the material exhibits a strong time-dependent response over a broad distribution of time-scales. The combination of mechanical characterisation with biological perturbations offers new insight into the mechanisms exploited by cells and tissue to control their mechanical properties. This insight is however limited by the lack of consistency in experimental protocols and modelling strategies used in the field. We recently developed a systematic approach to capture material properties from mechanical behaviours and made progress assessing the model’s generality over a broad range of biological systems
    Close abstract

    Stress and inflammation in tumor progression and metastasis

    Date:
    13
    Monday
    May
    2019
    -
    15
    Wednesday
    May
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 12:00 - 17:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Deconstructing and reconstructing the ovarian cancer microenvironment

    Date:
    13
    Monday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Frances Balkwill
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    UVB-Induced Tumor Heterogeneity Directs Immune Response in Melanoma

    Date:
    02
    Thursday
    May
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: CANCER RESEARCH CLUB
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Yardena Samuels
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Modulation of T-cell activity by the human T-cell leukemia virus fusion peptide

    Date:
    30
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Eita Rotem
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: In order to infect and persist in their hosts, viruses utilize multiple strategi ... Read more In order to infect and persist in their hosts, viruses utilize multiple strategies to evade the immune system. HIV utilizes membrane interacting regions of its envelope protein, primarily used to fuse with its target cells, to inhibit T-cell activation. Yet, it is unknown whether this ability is shared with other viruses. We examined the T-cell inhibitory activity of HTLV-1, focusing on a functionally conserved region of HTLV’s and HIV’s fusion proteins, the fusion peptide (FP). Here, we reveal that HTLV’s FP modulates T-cell activity in-vitro and in-vivo. This modulation is characterized by downregulation of the Th1-response, leading to an elevated Th2-response observed by transition in mRNA, cytokines and regulatory proteins. Our findings suggest that FP mediated immune evasion might be a trait shared between different viruses.
    Close abstract

    CRASH COURSE ON GENOMICS and BIOINFORMATICS OF CANCER

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:45-14:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Eytan Ruppin, Prof. Itay Tirosh
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences

    Precision Oncology: How precise is it and what's next?

    Date:
    17
    Wednesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Sofia Merajver
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Imm Special Guest Seminar:Prof. Jo Van Ginderachter, will lecture on "Macrophages in the healthy and the tumor-bearing brain: linking single-cell transcriptomics to function."

    Date:
    16
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Jo Van Ginderachter
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    Mechanisms of longevity and cancer-resistance: lessons from long-lived animals

    Date:
    14
    Sunday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Prof. Vera Gorbunova & Prof. Andrei Seluanov
    Organizer: Life Sciences
    Details: Host: Prof. Avraham Levy

    Applying cancer unique metabolism for patients’ diagnosis and therapy

    Date:
    11
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Ayelet Erez
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    NK cells in Cancer: The next Breakthrough?

    Date:
    07
    Sunday
    April
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research

    Considering alternatives to targeted therapy of cancer

    Date:
    04
    Thursday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Yinon Ben-Neriah
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    LSCF special Flow Cytometry Seminar

    Date:
    02
    Tuesday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-13:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    1st Israeli Flow Cytometry Meeting

    Date:
    31
    Sunday
    March
    2019
    -
    01
    Monday
    April
    2019
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    1st Israeli Flow Cytometry Conference

    Date:
    31
    Sunday
    March
    2019
    -
    01
    Monday
    April
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 00:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities

    Mapping the Breakome of Cancer Cells: What Lessons have we Learned?

    Date:
    28
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Rami Aqeilan
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Kaluza – flow cytometry analysis software

    Date:
    26
    Tuesday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:15-13:15
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Shlomit Rak-Yahalom Rhenium
    Organizer: Department of Life Sciences Core Facilities
    Details: 10:15-11:15 - Kaluza introduction and features 11:15-12:15 - FCS data analysis ... Read more 10:15-11:15 - Kaluza introduction and features 11:15-12:15 - FCS data analysis demonstration 12:15-13:15 - Personal fcs data analysis
    Close details

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof.Yuval Shaked will lecture on "Therapy-induced a phenotype and functional switch in cells at the tumor microenvironment in response to therapy dictates tumor fate.""

    Date:
    25
    Monday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Yuval Shaked
    Organizer: Department of Immunology
    Details: Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surg ... Read more Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular effects which, in turn, lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host effects is attributed to pro-inflammation, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumor and seeding at metastatic sites. Various bone marrow derived cells participate in this process, and many different factors are secreted from host cells in response to the therapy which then lead to tumor relapse and even resistance to therapy. The recent advances in cancer immunotherapy have significantly improved therapeutic outcomes in a subset of patients with advanced malignancies, still most patients do not respond to treatment and some even hyper progress. In my presentation, I will discuss several examples of how host cells undergo a functional and phenotype switch in response to therapy which contribute to tumor relapse and hyperprogression in response to therapy. I will also demonstrate how blocking the host pro-tumorigenic responses to therapy can minimize therapy resistance and improve therapy outcome.
    Close details

    Exosomal transmission between macrophages and cancer cells: new insights to sroma-mediated drug resistance

    Date:
    21
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ziv Gil
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    “LAP and LANDO: Noncanonical functions of autophagy proteins in anti-cancer immunity and Alzheimer's Disease”

    Date:
    18
    Monday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Douglas R. Green
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Vav1: A Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde protein--good for the hematopoietic system, bad for cancer

    Date:
    14
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Shulamit Katzav-Shapira
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Designing precision nanomedicines to diagnose, excise and treat melanoma brain metastases in three dimensions

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    EMERGING CONCEPTS IN BREAST CANCER

    Date:
    03
    Sunday
    March
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-14:00
    Title: Minerva and Dwek Institute for Cancer Therapy Research workshop
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Sima Lev, Prof. Stefan Wiemann, Prof. Carlos Caldas
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Shaping the Inflammatory Niche: Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Facilitate Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Date:
    21
    Thursday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Neta Erez
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    UV protection-timer and UV systemic effect

    Date:
    14
    Thursday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Carmit Levy
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    eIF1A promotes translation of cell cycle genes

    Date:
    12
    Tuesday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:30
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Urmila Sehrawat
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Protein synthesis is linked to cell proliferation and its deregulation contribut ... Read more Protein synthesis is linked to cell proliferation and its deregulation contributes to diseases such as cancer. eIF1A plays a key role in scanning and AUG selection and differentially affects translation of distinct mRNAs. Its unstructured N-terminal tail (NTT) is frequently mutated in several malignancies. Here, we show that eIF1A is essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression. Ribosome-profiling of eIF1A knockdown cells revealed a substantial reduction in protein synthesis, with particular enrichment of cell-cycle mRNAs. The downregulated genes are predominantly characterized by lengthy 5’UTR. On the other hand, eIF1A depletion caused a broad stimulation of initiation in 5’UTRs at near-cognate AUG. Importantly, cancer-associated eIF1A-NTT mutants augment the positive effect of eIF1A on long 5’UTR while hardly affecting AUG selection. Our findings suggest that reduced binding of eIF1A NTT mutants to the ribosome retains its open state and facilitate scanning of long 5’UTR-containing cell cycle genes.
    Close abstract

    Frustrations in the treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    February
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Uziel Beller
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Gain Fat - Lose Metastasis: From cancer cell plasticity to differentiation theraphy

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Dana Ishay Ronen
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Special Guest Seminar with Prof. Joel S. Bader

    Date:
    23
    Wednesday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00
    Title: “Identifying drivers of breast cancer metastasis”
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Joel S. Bader
    Organizer: The Kahn Family Research Center for Systems Biology of the Human Cell
    Abstract: Most breast cancer deaths are from metastasis, rather than growth of the primary ... Read more Most breast cancer deaths are from metastasis, rather than growth of the primary tumor. Therapies for reducing deaths from metastatic cancer are limited, in part because much of the basic biology of metastasis remains unknown. We are developing and applying methods to identify these basic mechanisms. We describe work with experimental and clinical partners using organoids, clusters of 300-500 primary mammary cells, to interrogate metastasis-related phenotypes. We present new mathematical image processing methods that convert organoid images into quantitative invasion phenotypes. We then discuss genes and pathways whose activities lead to invasion, dissemination, and metastasis. Often the driver and effector genes are poor candidates for therapeutic intervention, but signaling intermediates can be targeted. We are prioritizing intermediates using new methods that characterize the density of paths through a biological network. We are recruiting women with breast cancer to participate in these studies as part of our US NCI Cancer Target Discovery & Development (CTD2) Center.
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    IMM Guest seminar-Prof. Yoram Reiter will lecture on "Engineering Immune Effector Molecules and Cells for Immunotherapy of Cancer and Autoimmunity."

    Date:
    21
    Monday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Yoram Reiter
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof. Yinon Ben-Neriah will lecture on "Targeting the transcriptional addiction of leukemia cells"

    Date:
    14
    Monday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Yinon Ben-Neriah
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    IMM Guest seminar- Prof. Tal Burstyn-Cohen will lecture on "Myeloid-derived PROS1 Inhibits Tumor Metastasis by Curbing Inflammation."

    Date:
    07
    Monday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00-14:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Tal Burstyn-Cohen
    Organizer: Department of Immunology

    3rd Bi Annual Leukemia Meeting- Sunday January 6th at 09:00.

    Date:
    06
    Sunday
    January
    2019
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-13:30
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Department of Immunology
    Details: 0900-09:30 Get together 09:30-10:00 Dr. Jonathan Cnaanai: “Clinical and molec ... Read more 0900-09:30 Get together 09:30-10:00 Dr. Jonathan Cnaanai: “Clinical and molecular determinants of response to salvage chemotherapy in AML patients“ 10:00-10:45 Prof. Eyal Gottlieb: “targeting metabolic traits of leukemic stem cell” 10:45-11:30 Sara Isabel-Fernandes: ”Adaptations in lipid metabolism is required for the survival of leukemic cells in the CNS”. 11:30-12:30 Break. 12:30-13:30 Prof. Gidi Rechavi group: “Epitranscriptomic regulation of gene expression in normal hematopoiesis and leukemia.”
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    Chemical and Biological Physics Guest Seminar

    Date:
    30
    Sunday
    December
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30
    Title: New Frontiers in Membrane Biophysics
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Raya Sorkin
    Organizer: Department of Chemical and Biological Physics
    Abstract: Membranes compartmentalize living matter into cells and subcellular structures. ... Read more Membranes compartmentalize living matter into cells and subcellular structures. Many life processes involve membrane topological changes and remodelling: the uptake of materials via endocytosis and secretion by exocytosis, the generation of intra or extra-cellular vesicles as well as various membrane fusion processes. In order to get to the bottom of these fundamental physiological processes, it is vital to study membrane mechanical properties and membrane deformation. In this talk I will present the results of our research on several aspects of vesicle generation and membrane fusion using single molecule techniques. By means of an AFM force spectroscopy study we characterized the mechanical properties of small natural vesicles, called extracellular vesicles (EVs). Investigating the mechanical properties of these vesicles and their lipid and protein content provided new insights into the still poorly understood processes underlying vesicle generation. Acoustic Force Spectroscopy (AFS) was the choice for our novel methodology to measure cell mechanical properties. It enabled our finding that uptake of EVs by cells changes cellular deformability, a process that may have implications in several disease states where EV levels are significantly elevated, such as malaria and breast cancer. Combining optical tweezers with confocal fluorescence microscopy was the perfect tool for the investigation of membrane remodelling by calcium sensor proteins which are crucial in neuronal communication. We discovered surprising differences between the action mechanisms of two structurally similar proteins, Doc2b and Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1), as determined by quantifying the strength and probabilities of protein-induced membrane-membrane interactions. Overall these fundamentally new insights into central biological processes were possible by our biophysical characterization of membranes using a powerful combination of single molecule techniques: Optical tweezers combined with confocal fluorescent microscopy, AFS and AFM.
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    Chemical and Biological Physics Special Seminar

    Date:
    25
    Tuesday
    December
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:45
    Title: Cell-Matrix Interactions in Fibrosis and Cancer: Multiscale mechano-chemical models
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Vivek Shenoy
    Organizer: Clore Center for Biological Physics
    Abstract: Much of our understanding of the biological mechanisms that underlie cellular fu ... Read more Much of our understanding of the biological mechanisms that underlie cellular functions, such as migration, differentiation and force sensing has been garnered from studying cells cultured on two-dimensional (2D) substrates. In the recent years there has been intense interest and effort to understand cell mechanics in three-dimensional (3D) cultures, which more closely resemble the in vivo microenvironment. However, a major challenge unique to 3D settings is the dynamic feedback between cells and their surroundings. In many 3D matrices, cells remodel and reorient local extracellular microenvironment, which in turn alters the active mechanics and in many cases, the cell phenotype. Most models for matrices to date do not account for such positive feedback. Such models, validated by experiments, can provide a quantitative framework to study how injury related factors (in pathological conditions such as fibrosis and cancer metastasis) alter extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics. They can also be used to analyze tissue morphology in complex 3D environments such as during morphogenesis and organogenesis, and guide such processes in engineered 3D tissues. In this talk, I will present discrete network simulations to study how cells remodel matrices and how this remodeling can lead to force transmission over large distances in cells. I will also discuss an active tissue model to quantitatively study the influence of mechanical constraints and matrix stiffness on contractility and stability of micropatterned tissues.
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    Translational control of cancer and neurological disease via eIF4E

    Date:
    18
    Tuesday
    December
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Nahum Sonenberg
    Organizer: Department of Structural Biology

    Chemical and Biological Physics and The Clore Center for Biological Physics Seminar

    Date:
    12
    Wednesday
    December
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 13:00
    Title: Biological Tissues as Active Materials
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. M. Cristina Marchetti
    Organizer: Clore Center for Biological Physics
    Abstract: The mechanical properties of dense tissues control many biological processes, fr ... Read more The mechanical properties of dense tissues control many biological processes, from wound healing to embryonic development to cancer progression. In this talk I will discuss recent theoretical work that combines developmental models with active matter physics to describe dense tissue as active materials that exhibit a jamming-unjamming transition tuned by cell shape and cell motility. Cell division and death, as well as mechanical feedback that coordinates cell migration, can modify the transition resulting in novel tissue ``materials’’ properties. These findings may have implications for cell sorting and patterning in wound healing and development.
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    Small Molecule Inhibitors of Breast Cancer

    Date:
    10
    Monday
    December
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Nira Ben-Jonathan
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    TBA

    Date:
    10
    Monday
    December
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Nira Ben Jonathan
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Prof. Michal Schwartz - Will Immunotherapy defeat Alzheimer’s disease?

    Date:
    04
    Tuesday
    December
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Title: Will Immunotherapy defeat Alzheimer’s disease?
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Prof. Michal Schwartz
    Organizer: Communications and Spokesperson Department
    Details: The lecture is in Hebrew

    Prof. Michal Schwartz - Will Immunotherapy defeat Alzheimer’s disease?

    Date:
    04
    Tuesday
    December
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00-13:00
    Title: Will Immunotherapy defeat Alzheimer’s disease?
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Prof. Michal Schwartz
    Organizer: Communications and Spokesperson Department
    Details: The lecture is in Hebrew

    Prof. Michal Schwartz - Will Immunotherapy defeat Alzheimer’s disease?

    Date:
    04
    Tuesday
    December
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 12:00
    Title: Will Immunotherapy defeat Alzheimer’s disease?
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer: Prof. Michal Schwartz
    Organizer: Communications and Spokesperson Department
    Details: The lecture is in Hebrew

    Students’ and Post-docs’ Cancer Research Innovation Awards- presentation event

    Date:
    29
    Thursday
    November
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:00-12:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    A new way cancer cells cope with proteotoxic stress

    Date:
    28
    Wednesday
    November
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Dr. Peter Tsvetkov
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Maintaining protein homeostasis is crucial for cell survival and coping with env ... Read more Maintaining protein homeostasis is crucial for cell survival and coping with environmental stressors. The mechanisms that cells deploy to cope with increased proteotoxic burden are still poorly understood. In this work, using genetic screens, cancer genomics analysis and biochemical validations we determine a new way cancer cells can cope with increased proteotoxic burden. This mechanism involves two complementary cellular adaptations that are sufficient to promote cell survival when proteasome function is suppressed. These cellular adaptations are naturally occurring in many cancer types and evolutionary conserved and entail a vulnerability that can be targeted with a newly identified mitochondrial pathway inhibitor for which the unique mechanism of action we describe.
    Close abstract

    The simplicity within complexity of type 1 IFN signaling

    Date:
    27
    Tuesday
    November
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:30-11:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Victoria Urin
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Type I interferons (IFN-1) are best known for their role in innate immunity, but ... Read more Type I interferons (IFN-1) are best known for their role in innate immunity, but they are also involved in immunomodulation, proliferation, cancer surveillance, and the regulation of the adaptive immune response. How does the interaction of a cytokine with its receptors promote such diverse activities? To answer this question, I generated knockout (KO) HeLa cell lines and learned how these KOs affect different activities. The deletion of either STAT1 or STAT2 alone reduced, but did not eliminate IFN-1 induced activities. Conversely, the deletion of both completely abrogated any IFN-1 activity. So did the double STAT2-IRF1 KO, and a knockdown of IRF9 on background of STAT1 KO, suggesting the GAS pathway and the STAT2-IRF9 dimer as complimentary pathways to STAT1-STAT2. Interestingly, deletion of any of the mentioned components had no effect on the phosporylation of any of the other STATs including STAT3 and STAT6. To directly asses the importance of STAT3 in the system, I generates its KO, which had no effect on IFN-1 activation. Those evidence suggest that IFN-1 induced signaling goes only through STAT1 and STAT2, although not both are required.
    Close abstract

    Exploring the dependence of HSF1’s transcriptional program in cancer stroma on the epigenome

    Date:
    27
    Tuesday
    November
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-10:15
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Coral Halperin
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: The tumor microenvironment (TME) has gained increasing attention in the last few ... Read more The tumor microenvironment (TME) has gained increasing attention in the last few years, yet the exact mechanism by which the TME is reprogrammed to promote tumor phenotypes is not very clear. We have recently found that Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) transcriptionally reprograms cancer associate fibroblasts (CAFs) in the TME towards a protumorigenic phenotype. HSF1 is a transcription factor that activates 3 different transcriptional programs in 3 different states of the cell - heat-shock, cancer cell and CAF. In this work I explore the hypothesis that a disparate DNA methylation or histone modification landscape results in differential access of HSF1 to the DNA, and leads to different transcriptional programs between cancer cells, CAFs and heat-shocked cells, by using bisulfite sequencing for establish a methylome profile of each cell states and Preform ChIP-seq with HSF1 antibodies in each type of cells to obtain the binding pattern of this TF in the different cells types/states. This work will provide a much-needed understanding on the epigenetic map of CAFs in the TME, which is currently lacking.
    Close abstract

    Cancer Volatolomics: From Evidence to Point-of-Care Diagnostics

    Date:
    15
    Thursday
    November
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Hossam Haick
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: The current talk will present evidences that each cancer has its own unique vola ... Read more The current talk will present evidences that each cancer has its own unique volatile molecular print and, therefore, the presence of one cancer would not screen out others. Based on this concept, a new generation of biomedical devices for achieving personalized diagnosis of various cancers in a noninvasive, inexpensive and portable manner via various body fluids (e.g., breath or skin) will be presented and discussed.
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    DWEK Workshop on Children & Cancer

    Date:
    04
    Sunday
    November
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 08:00-17:00
    Title: See Conferences
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Ayelet Erez and Yosef Yarden
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Ultrahigh Field MR Imaging in the Mesosphere Where Physics, Life Sciences, Computer Sciences and Medicine Meet

    Date:
    28
    Sunday
    October
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 16:30-17:30
    Location: Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer: Prof. Thoralf Niendorf
    Organizer: Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Abstract: The development of ultrahigh field magnetic resonance (UHF-MR) is moving forward ... Read more The development of ultrahigh field magnetic resonance (UHF-MR) is moving forward at an amazing speed that is breaking through technical barriers almost as fast as they appear. UHF-MR has a staggering number of potential uses in neuroscience, neurology, radiology, cardiology, internal medicine, physiology, oncology, nephrology, ophthalmology and other related clinical fields. With over 50,000 MR examinations already performed at 7.0 Tesla, the reasons for moving UHF-MR into clinical applications are more compelling than ever. The value UHF-MR has already proven itself many times over at lower field strengths; now 7.0 T has opened a window on tissues, organs, and (patho)physiological processes that have been largely inaccessible in the past. Images from these instruments have revealed new aspects of the anatomy, functions and physio-metabolic characteristics of the brain, heart, joints, kidneys, liver, eye, and other organs/tissues, at an unparalleled quality. 50,000 sounds like a large number, but in fact we have barely cracked open the door and have yet to truly assess what lies on the other side. To this end this presentation documents advances and progress of UHF-MR with the goal to engage the interest of clinical adopters, basic scientists, engineers, and translational researchers from many areas. To meet this goal the traits, challenges and opportunities for discovery of human UHF-MRI will be surveyed. The considerations run from technical advances to early clinical applications. Examples of UHF-MR strategies are demonstrated. Their added value over the kindred counterparts at lower fields is explored along with an outline of research promises. Encouraging developments into enabling multiple channel radiofrequency (RF) antennae concepts (Figure 1) are reviewed. Frontier applications of MR at 7.0 T are surveyed including cardiac imaging (Figure 1), ophthalmic MRI and high spatial resolution MRI of the brain. Heteronuclear UHF-MR applications are explored with a focus on in vivo mapping of electrolytes including potassium MRI and sodium MRI (Figure 1). Practical obstacles of UHF MR are outlined including MR safety. Insights into RF heating induced by conductive stents and implants are provided. Current trends in UHF-MR are considered together with their clinical implications. A concluding section ventures a glance beyond the horizon including explorations into Extreme Field MR (EF-MR) which envisions human MR at 20 Tesla, which is an important leap of the imagination because it aims to fill a crucial "resolution gap" in our understanding of human biology (39, 40). It is the speakers hope that this presentation will convey the seeds of this vision and inspire the audience to become pioneers in these amazingly promising new areas of biomedical research: ultrahigh field and extreme field MR..
    Close abstract

    Unravelling the tumor immune microenvironment by multiplexed imaging

    Date:
    28
    Sunday
    October
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 15:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Leeat Yankielowicz-Keren
    Organizer: Department of Immunology,Department of Molecular Cell Biology,Department of Molecular Genetics

    Development of placenta-derived (PLX) cell therapy- from bench- to bedside

    Date:
    25
    Thursday
    October
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Lecture
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Racheli Ofir
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: PLacental expanded (PLX) cells are placenta-derived, mesenchymal-like adherent s ... Read more PLacental expanded (PLX) cells are placenta-derived, mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells expanded using a bioreactor system which provides a three dimensional (3D) micro-environment enabling tightly controlled expansion. Accumulated data from multiple in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that these cells act via a paracrine or endocrine manner to facilitate healing of damaged tissue. Pluristem’s two lead placenta-derived cell products, PLX-PAD and PLX-R18, are each in clinical development for several indications. PLX-Immune is in non-clinical development stages for Cancer. Data from non-clinical as well as clinical studies will be presented.
    Close abstract

    G-INCPM-Special Seminar - Prof. Rony Seger, Department of Biological Regulation, Weizmann Institute - "Targeting the nuclear translocation of MAPKs as a novel anti-inflammatory and anti cancer therapy"

    Date:
    17
    Wednesday
    October
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:15
    Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: A hallmark of MAPK signaling is their nuclear translocation upon stimulation, wh ... Read more A hallmark of MAPK signaling is their nuclear translocation upon stimulation, which is necessary for their physiological/pathological functions. We have identified two novel, distinct, regulated nuclear translocation mechanisms for ERK1/2 and JNK/p38, of which we made use of as a promising therapeutic approach. We developed a myristoylated, NTS-derived phosphomimetic peptide (EPE peptide), which blocked ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. In culture, the EPE peptide induced apoptosis of melanoma cells, inhibited the proliferation of other cancer cells but had no effect on immortalized cells. Combination of the EPE peptide and the MEK inhibitor had synergistic antitumor activity in mutated NRAS, BRAF and NF1 melanoma and Kras pancreatic cells. In xenograft models, the peptide was significantly more effective than BRAF inhibitors in preventing tumor recurrence of treatment-eradicated melanoma xenografts. We also developed p38-derived myristoylated peptide, termed PERY peptide, which inhibited the importin interaction with JNK1/2 and p38α/β and prevented their nuclear translocation. This peptide affected viability of several breast cancer-derived cell lines, and significantly reduced inflammation and intestinal damage in a mouse model of colitis. Moreover, the peptide inhibited inflammation-induced colorectal cancer in a AOM/DSS mouse model. Taken together, both the cancer and inflammatory models support the use of nuclear translocation of MAPKs as a novel drug target for signaling-related diseases.
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    Special Guest Seminar by Prof. Robert A. Weinberg

    Date:
    15
    Monday
    October
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30-10:30
    Title: Epigenetic Mechanisms of Tumor Progression
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Lecturer: Robert A. Weinberg Ph.D
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Unraveling novel protease activity mechanisms at the tumor microenvironment of pancreas cancers

    Date:
    08
    Monday
    October
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Irit Sagi
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Proteomic analysis of breast cancer heterogeneity

    Date:
    20
    Thursday
    September
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Tamar Geiger
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: For more information and assistance with Accessibility issues, please contact ... Read more For more information and assistance with Accessibility issues, please contact Rina Tzoref, Seminars Coordinator: li.tzoref@weizmann.ac.il Batya Greenman: batya.greenman@weizmann.ac.il Host Prof. Yosef Yarden 08 934 4015 yosef.yarden@weizmann.ac.il Breast cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases, traditionally distinguished based on the expression levels of three key receptors: Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and Her2. However extensive mRNA expression studies, and genomic studies show higher complexity of classification and can further subdivide the tumors. In our work, we apply mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis and challenge the existing classification. Furthermore, we analyze the internal tumor heterogeneity by dividing the tumors according to their histopathological parameters, and identify the diversity of proteomic profiles within single tumors. Altogether, the proteomic approach was able to unravel hidden layers within this complex disease.
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    Diversity of transcriptional machineries that drive resistance to anti-tumor agents in head and neck cancer

    Date:
    12
    Wednesday
    September
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Speciqal Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Moshe Elkabets
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: Drug resistance is a major barrier in medical oncology. Refractoriness to anti-c ... Read more Drug resistance is a major barrier in medical oncology. Refractoriness to anti-cancer therapies is attributed to autonomous-tumor cell survival signaling (intrinsic mechanisms) or is mediated by growth factors secreted by cells in the tumor microenvironment (extrinsic mechanisms). Here I will describe the transcriptional machineries that regulate the expression of receptor tyrosine kinases following treatments with PI3K and EGFR therapies in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Specifically, I will show that AP-1 regulates AXL expression in PI3K-resistant cells, and EHF determines HER2/3 expression following EGFR inhibition.
    Close abstract

    PhD Defense Seminar- “The non-cell-autonomous function of p53 in the liver ״

    Date:
    30
    Thursday
    August
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Title: “The non-cell-autonomous function of p53 in the liver ״
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Meital Charni (Prof. Varda Rotter's lab)
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Cancer persisters

    Date:
    26
    Thursday
    July
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Ravid Straussman
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: Persister cells are considered a unique, small sub-population of cancer cells th ... Read more Persister cells are considered a unique, small sub-population of cancer cells that maintain viability under anti-cancer treatments. Persisters do not harbor classic resistance-mediating genetic mutations, and their drug-resistance phenotype is thought to be reversible. I will describe our novel findings related to the persisters phenotype and how these findings can be exploited to rationally design novel drug combinations optimized to eliminate persisters.
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    G-INCPM - Special Seminar - Prof. Jürgen Reichardt, Vice-Chancellor for Research and Innovation, Yachay Tech University, Ecuador - "Quo vadis, genoma? Lessons from Galactosemia, Prostate Cancer and Atherosclerosis"

    Date:
    23
    Monday
    July
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:15
    Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Lecturer: Prof. Jürgen Reichardt
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Juergen Reichardt will report on the genetic and biochemical characterization of ... Read more Juergen Reichardt will report on the genetic and biochemical characterization of galactosemia mutations. Furthermore, he will describe the molecular epidemiology of prostate cancer, incl. the racial/ethnic variation of risk and the molecular and biochemical dissection of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), haplotypes and compound heterozygotes. These data will be related to prostate cancer prevention and the PCPT (the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial) which enrolled 18,000 men in the US and Canada. Furthermore, Juergen will delve into the ongoing issues with SNP databases. Lastly, he will discuss future directions in the context of his career.
    Close abstract

    EGFR/Ceramide and lung cancer development under stress

    Date:
    18
    Wednesday
    July
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Tzipi Goldkorn
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Single-molecule Visualization of Long-range Epigenetic Regulation

    Date:
    12
    Thursday
    July
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Yuval Ebenstein
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: Epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation is well established in the context of t ... Read more Epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation is well established in the context of the classical Promoter:Coding box. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) indicate that the methylation state of distant enhancers play a critical role in gene expression. In cancer, such distant epigenetic aberrations can have significant effects on carcinogenesis. In order to uncover these long-range interactions on the single-cell level, I present an epigenome-mapping technology based on fluorescent tagging of epigenetic marks on long individual DNA molecules. Information is read as a fluorescent genetic/epigenetic barcode that provides genome-scale profiles with extremely long reads. I discuss our progress towards simultaneous recording of methylation and transcription information from the same molecules with the aim of discovering and characterizing epigenetic gene-regulation at a distance.
    Close abstract

    Physicists working on Cancer

    Date:
    01
    Sunday
    July
    2018
    -
    12
    Thursday
    July
    2018
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Organizer: Faculty of Physics

    PHYSICISTS WORKING ON CANCER

    Date:
    01
    Sunday
    July
    2018
    -
    12
    Thursday
    July
    2018
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Nella and Leon Benoziyo Physics Library
    Organizer: Faculty of Physics

    FROM CANCER GENOMICS TO IMMUNOTHERAPY

    Date:
    19
    Tuesday
    June
    2018
    Conference
    Time: 08:00-14:00
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium

    A ubiquitous human carcinogen guiding the early diagnosis of cancer

    Date:
    14
    Thursday
    June
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Arthur Grollman
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: Aristolochic acid (AA) is now recognized as a causative agent of several types o ... Read more Aristolochic acid (AA) is now recognized as a causative agent of several types of human cancer. Moreover, as a component of Aristolochia, a widely used medicinal herb, it is now clear that people have been exposed to toxic levels of AA for hundreds of years, worldwide. Today, tens of millions of people are at risk of developing AA-induced cancers of the upper urothelium, kidney, liver and biliary tract. In addition, aristolochic acid was proven to be the environmental agent responsible for Balkan endemic nephropathy and its associated urothelial cancer. And, exposure to AA accounts for the high prevalence of upper urothelial cancer in Taiwan, the highest in the world. It has also been shown that AA-induced cancers are accompanied by a unique mutational signature, which can be used to identify AA-induced cancers in individuals who would otherwise be undiagnosed until the later stages of disease. Such analyses have established the foundation for a noninvasive approach for detection of urothelial cancer in patients at risk.
    Close abstract

    The best cancer therapy is prevention and early detection: the decade-long perspectives of our Integrated Cancer Prevention Center

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    June
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Nadir Arber
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Prostate Cancer

    Date:
    07
    Thursday
    June
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-13:00
    Title: Clinical Oncology Course
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Nicola Mabjeesh
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    MICC SPECIAL GUEST SEMINAR

    Date:
    05
    Tuesday
    June
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00
    Title: “Back to the Future: Lessons about cancer from development”
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Professor Geoffrey M. Wahl, Ph.D
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    Lung cancer and HER family proteins

    Date:
    31
    Thursday
    May
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Hovav Nechushtan
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Brain Cancer

    Date:
    31
    Thursday
    May
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-13:00
    Title: Clinical Oncology Course
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Uri Tabori
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Pancreatic Cancer Biology & Medicine

    Date:
    29
    Tuesday
    May
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 09:30
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. David Tuveson
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    From Photosynthesis to Cancer Therapy

    Date:
    27
    Sunday
    May
    2018
    -
    28
    Monday
    May
    2018
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Targeting Pancreas Cancer

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    May
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. David Kelsen
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Breast Cancer

    Date:
    24
    Thursday
    May
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-13:00
    Title: Clinical Oncology Course
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Tamar Peretz-Yablonski
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Computational tools for

    Date:
    17
    Thursday
    May
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Club Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Ron Shamir
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Hereditary Genetics

    Date:
    17
    Thursday
    May
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-13:00
    Title: Clinical Oncology Course
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Ayelet Erez
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Senescent cells and the dynamics of ageing

    Date:
    10
    Thursday
    May
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Uri Alon
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Modeling the initiation, progression and treatment of human melanoma in the mouse

    Date:
    30
    Monday
    April
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Glenn Merlino
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Pancreas cancer, inflammation, and immunity: of mice and men

    Date:
    29
    Sunday
    April
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Dr. Francisco X Real & Dr. Núria Malats
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    "Genomic approaches to studying cancer aneuploidy"

    Date:
    23
    Monday
    April
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Uri Ben-David
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Details: Abstract: Cancer aneuploidy is a biological enigma and a missed opportunity for ... Read more Abstract: Cancer aneuploidy is a biological enigma and a missed opportunity for cancer treatment. The association between cancer and aneuploidy has been well known for decades, but there has been rather limited progress in understanding how aneuploidy contributes to cancer initiation and progression. In this talk, I will discuss my postdoctoral work that applied genomic approaches to study the relevance of aneuploidy to cancer pathogenesis. In my first study, I analyzed genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and revealed a driver-specific pattern of aneuploidy. This work narrowed down the region of interest in one of the most recurrent chromosomal changes in human breast cancer (loss of chromosome 1p), and identified a gene (Sfn) that cooperates with Erbb2 during breast cancer tumorigenesis. In a second study, I analyzed patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) and revealed distinct tumor evolution trajectories in patients and in mice. This work also identified significant associations between recurrent aneuploidies and drug response. In a third study, I analyzed cancer cell lines and revealed that the genomic instability of these models results in altered transcriptional programs and disparate drug response. This work also yielded a novel isogenic system to study cancer aneuploidy in vitro. Together, these three works shed new light on the faithfulness and stability of the most commonly used cancer models, and lay a foundation for their proper use in functional studies of cancer aneuploidy.
    Close details

    G-INCPM- Special Seminar - Prof. Yuval Dor, Dept. of Developmental Biology & Cancer Research, The Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem - "Non Invasive Detection of Tissue-Specific Cell Death"

    Date:
    17
    Tuesday
    April
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:15
    Location: Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine
    Lecturer: Prof. yuval Dor
    Organizer: Department of Biomolecular Sciences
    Abstract: Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA), released from dying cells, is emerging as a d ... Read more Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA), released from dying cells, is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans, based on tissue-specific methylation patterns of DNA circulating in plasma. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome datasets to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures, and established a method to detect these in mixed DNA samples and in cfDNA isolated from plasma. Using this new type of biomarker it is possible to detect the presence of cfDNA fragments derived from multiple tissues in healthy individuals and in pathologies including cancer, myocardial infarction, sepsis, neurodegeneration and more. In the long run we envision this approach opening a minimally-invasive window for monitoring and diagnosis of a broad spectrum of human pathologies, as well as better understanding of normal tissue dynamics.
    Close abstract

    Identifying and targeting

    Date:
    12
    Thursday
    April
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Eyal Gottlieb
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    EMBO workshop on Noncoding RNAs in Development and Cell Differentiation

    Date:
    08
    Sunday
    April
    2018
    -
    11
    Wednesday
    April
    2018
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre

    Clinical & Future Directions for Treatments of Prevalent Cancer Types - LUNG CANCER

    Date:
    29
    Thursday
    March
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:15-13:00
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Jair Bar
    Organizer: Feinberg Graduate School

    Improving breast cancer recurrence prediction and understanding using expression profiles and machine learning

    Date:
    26
    Monday
    March
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Eitan Rubin
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    Breast cancer heterogeneity - what, when and where?

    Date:
    12
    Monday
    March
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Carlos Caldas
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    MICC cancer research workshop for clinical residents

    Date:
    21
    Wednesday
    February
    2018
    -
    22
    Thursday
    February
    2018
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Raoul and Graziella de Picciotto Building for Scientific and Technical Support
    Organizer: Moross Integrated Cancer Center (MICC)

    Coordinated regulation of gut microbiota and immune checkpoint by RNF5 ubiquitin ligase

    Date:
    15
    Thursday
    February
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Zeev Ronai
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: Growing evidence points to the importance of gut microbiome in tumor response to ... Read more Growing evidence points to the importance of gut microbiome in tumor response to therapy, including immune checkpoint therapy. Yet, fundamental questions regarding the regulation of the gut microbiota and possible cross talk with immune checkpoint activity remains largely unexplored. Our work on the E3 ubiquitin ligase, which has been implicated in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation, led us to identify an unexpected link between the ligase and tumor growth, through fine tuning of gut microbiota and immune checkpoint activity. The nature of such coordinated regulation and its implications for cancer development, response to therapy and autoimmune disorders will be discussed.
    Close abstract

    Translational control in Melanoma

    Date:
    15
    Thursday
    February
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00
    Location: Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Caroline Robert
    Organizer: Department of Molecular Cell Biology

    When Lymphocytes

    Date:
    01
    Thursday
    February
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Eli Pikarsky
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: Inflammation usually entails a diffuse influx of immune cells, scattered through ... Read more Inflammation usually entails a diffuse influx of immune cells, scattered throughout the inflamed tissue. However, it can also form complex structures that histologically resemble lymphoid organs, referred to as ectopic lymphoid-like structures (ELSs). Using a mouse model forming hepatic ELSs we revealed that they can form protumorigenic immune niches, which foster growth of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progenitors. We are currently investigating the mechanisms that drive HCC formation in ELSs, as well as mechanisms that turn the ELS from an anti-tumor immune micro-organ into a protumorigenic one.
    Close abstract

    Personalized Nanomedicines: Principles for using nanotechnology in cancer research

    Date:
    28
    Sunday
    January
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 11:00-12:00
    Location: Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Avi Schroeder
    Organizer: Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Abstract: Medicine is taking its first steps towards patient-specific care. Nanoparticle ... Read more Medicine is taking its first steps towards patient-specific care. Nanoparticles have many potential benefits for treating cancer, including the ability to transport complex molecular cargoes including siRNA and protein, as well as targeting to specific cell populations. The talk will address principles for engineering drug-loaded nanoparticles that can be remotely triggered to release their payload in disease sites. The evolution of such nanoparticles into programmed nano robots, unique particles that have an internal capacity to synthesize protein drugs, and their promise for treating cancer, will be discussed. Our research is aimed at tailoring treatments to address each person’s individualized needs and unique disease presentation. Specifically, we developed barcoded nanoparticles that target sites of cancer where they perform a programmed therapeutic task. These systems utilize molecular-machines to improve efficacy and reduce side effects.
    Close abstract

    The 3rd meeting of the Israeli Breast Cancer Translational Research Group

    Date:
    18
    Thursday
    January
    2018
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Organizer: Moross Research School of Mathematics and Computer Science,Faculty of Biochemistry,Faculty of Biology

    The barcode of life – using 600 species to improve cancer diagnostics and drug development

    Date:
    15
    Monday
    January
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Special Guest Seminar
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Dr. Yuval Tabach
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation

    The molecular mechanisms regulating CLL survival

    Date:
    11
    Thursday
    January
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 14:00-15:00
    Title: Cancer Research Club
    Location: Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Lecturer: Prof. Idit Shachar
    Organizer: Department of Biological Regulation
    Abstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in the Western wo ... Read more Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in the Western world. The disease is characterized by decreased apoptosis and accumulation of mature B lymphocytes. We have previously shown that CD74 induces a downstream cascade that regulates CLL survival. Recently, we showed that CD74-intracellular domain interacts with the transcription factors RUNX and NF-B and binds to proximal and distal regulatory sites enriched for genes involved in apoptosis, immune response and cell migration. One of CD74 target genes is CD84. Our results demonstrate that CD84 mediates the interaction of CLL cells with their microenvironment inducing cell survival. In addition, activation of CD84 elevates PD-L1 expression on CLL cells and their microenvironment which interact with PD-1 expressed on T cells. Our results suggest CD84 blockade as a novel therapeutic strategy to reverse tumor-induced immune suppression.
    Close abstract

    Single cell analysis of rare events in cancer

    Date:
    09
    Tuesday
    January
    2018
    Lecture / Seminar
    Time: 10:00-11:00
    Location: Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Lecturer: Prof. Arjun Raj
    Organizer: Azrieli Institute for Systems Biology

    Cancer Immunotherapy: successes and challenges

    Date:
    03
    Wednesday
    January
    2018
    Conference
    Time: 08:00
    Location: Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Organizer: Moross Integrated Cancer Center (MICC)